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Messages - Zach Hu Zerdaty

Pages: [1] 2
1
Movement / Re: Wall Run (horizontal)
« on: February 03, 2009, 10:39:18 AM »
I wouldn't think height has much to do with it. For starters, get going quickly doing one step on the wall, and then go to three. Skip two steps because the second step is just a lead in to the third and will be quite awkward if that's all you do because the landing may be a little messed up because if you think about it, wall running is just running normally, but on a wall. For the full wall run, here's what I suggest: 3/4 sprint up to that wall, and plant the first foot. Here, do not stop, but keep running naturally, but leaning out of the wall. When I started I had the same problem, but I was lucky enough to find some padded walls in a gym and some mats to prevent injury. With the confidence, it just happened. As far as shoes go: don't worry about it, they really have little impact so long as they have a little grip; the biggest problem with be the wall and whether or not it is wet. Practice on a padded wall or on a brick wall. They are the best. And don't bother if it is raining or it just rained. Its too slippery until you have mastered the movement. Anyway, that's my two bit on the matter, and I hope it helped you. Good Luck.

well what i mean is, it seams to me i can only ever do the three steps fast, and get maybe a second longer in the air, so when i do the one step i get hardly less time in the air and its less awekword, and i can still jump as high.

I do a three step wall run, but I can make the same distance in one step if I do it right, so I do belive its more asthetic but oh well, haha.

Wait, what?

2
North Dakota / Re: NDSU Bison
« on: February 03, 2009, 10:35:45 AM »
iight bro, i got one friend here in fargo, he is cor coste, and a few in moorhead, christopher gilbertson, reo, abdel abdala. these guys run with me.
we got some ok spots to.

3
Movement / Re: Wall Run (horizontal)
« on: January 22, 2009, 09:31:30 AM »
I wouldn't think height has much to do with it. For starters, get going quickly doing one step on the wall, and then go to three. Skip two steps because the second step is just a lead in to the third and will be quite awkward if that's all you do because the landing may be a little messed up because if you think about it, wall running is just running normally, but on a wall. For the full wall run, here's what I suggest: 3/4 sprint up to that wall, and plant the first foot. Here, do not stop, but keep running naturally, but leaning out of the wall. When I started I had the same problem, but I was lucky enough to find some padded walls in a gym and some mats to prevent injury. With the confidence, it just happened. As far as shoes go: don't worry about it, they really have little impact so long as they have a little grip; the biggest problem with be the wall and whether or not it is wet. Practice on a padded wall or on a brick wall. They are the best. And don't bother if it is raining or it just rained. Its too slippery until you have mastered the movement. Anyway, that's my two bit on the matter, and I hope it helped you. Good Luck.

I do a three step wall run, but I can make the same distance in one step if I do it right, so I do belive its more asthetic but oh well, haha.

4
Parkour And Freerunning / Re: How has parkour affected you?
« on: January 20, 2009, 03:58:12 PM »
       Parkour is one of the most significant things currently in my life. Parkour has changed my mental and physical health. I feel more at peace with the natural environment and man made architecture. Periodical resting during training sessions led to more deep meditation where I can be enlightened. It is a great feeling to sit back and enjoy the simpler parts of life where another non athlete would be oblivious or numbed to. The gentle breeze as it evaporates your sweat. Or the ambient sounds of trees and nature itself. Parkour’s effect on my physical shape has been phenomenal. I have never been in better shape of my life. It has motivated me towards a healthier lifestyle while also helping me to realize other reasons to be healthy. I have more control of my body, coordination, and balance. I take notice constantly on how my body in functioning even at rest and walking. I have also realized what I can and cannot do. I think in a more positive manner, where I strive to achieve goals. What I realized I cannot do, I strive to accomplish it. I know that in a time of need, I would be able to escape using more obscure paths at my heightened physical fitness.
   I would suggest to all, find your passion and stick with it.



hell yes my friend, hell yes. READ this

5
Socialize / Re: You know you're a traceur when...
« on: January 20, 2009, 03:56:47 PM »
"the burn"

Seriously, screw my legs. I would kill to train with some of you. I would hold you back because I'm new, but I would crawl away having learned a lot about the artform.
I know man.  I trained with PK Gen for one day and even though I was soar the next three days I would do it every day for the rest of my life if I could (I'm pretty sure everyone on this forum would do that though).

Yes, yes indeed.

6
Parkour And Freerunning / Re: i LOVE rolling.
« on: January 10, 2009, 03:26:56 PM »
I looked at the tutorial for rolling on this website, but i've been doing it some other way:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUPKgVqib7I Is this a bad way?  ???

that roll is fine bro, but the slow mo playback one looks like you need alot of forward momentum, if doping almost straight down it would be a lot xloser in, and tight.

nice though.

7
Welcome! / Re: Welcome Thread - New Members please announce here!
« on: January 09, 2009, 02:24:15 PM »
Hello,

Another newbie. I'm interested in parkour. I have to get much much stronger before I can start.

Nice to meet everyone
alinakathryn in Atlanta

I started not the strongest, I was stronger than most of my friends, but, you realy can start being weak, and get stronger in doing parkour.

8
Parkour And Freerunning / Re: i LOVE rolling.
« on: January 09, 2009, 08:22:28 AM »
nice, i roll right, i remember first few times i rolled along time ago i rolled in the middle lmao almost passed out hahahaha

9
Welcome! / Re: Welcome Thread - New Members please announce here!
« on: January 09, 2009, 07:55:45 AM »
Hey, I'm Sara and am really new to Parkour. Right now, I'm working on learning basic landing and rolls while I build up my strength for more advanced Parkour. I'm located in the Huntington, WV / Ashland, KY area and am impatiently waiting for winter to pass so I can go outside to practice.

I'm 21 years old and am really looking forward to time spent on here so I can learn as much as possible about the amazing Parkour.

So, hello everyone!!

nice choice in parkour. youl like it.

10
North Dakota / Unite. please
« on: January 08, 2009, 04:19:50 PM »
I have friends here in Fargo ND, look me up if your around.

11
FAQ / Re: How to Talk to Authorities
« on: January 08, 2009, 04:18:22 PM »
I have gotten in trouble for trespassing, NOTE: the owners of the property let me by saying "We belive he was being respectfull to our property and we found hardly any trace of his apearence."

12
Movement / Re: Wall Run (horizontal)
« on: January 08, 2009, 04:16:10 PM »
just to note, while the horazontal wall run is real, its not real-y practical, in most situations. i find it helps to hav verry flexible soul shoes or barely and soals at all.

13
Parkour And Freerunning / Re: How has parkour affected you?
« on: January 08, 2009, 09:19:40 AM »
i agree to an extent. some days i go out and just train alone and verry seriously, but i still hang out whith friends, my friends mean more than parkour does to me, but there verry close, i do however have to say, the one way parkour has changed me to most, is the way i see he world around me. I always see the oportunity, the flow.

14
Parkour And Freerunning / Re: The Expansion of Parkour
« on: January 08, 2009, 02:41:31 AM »
+1 greg verry insightfull, free running, the name that will get blown up, not parkour. anywhay, we are also the reson it grows, usualy becaus we want our skill to be recognised, but when others learn it we are thretend, or scared for them becaus they will not take it a serious as they need to to be safe.

15
Welcome! / Re: Mitch is here :D
« on: January 08, 2009, 12:20:53 AM »
+1 My friend I added your MSN I belive, and I would love to awenswer any questions, I have been in it for a year and a half now.

16
Parkour And Freerunning / Re: The Expansion of Parkour
« on: January 08, 2009, 12:16:10 AM »
Exactly, free runing/parkour is not only a verry amazing art form, its one i find amazingly usefull and fun in everyday life, and i belive that if it becomes to popular it will become much less amazing, and significant, you guys, the first time you droped off of your highest building you ever climbed, like I, i am sure you felt it, the amazing feeling of... "I can seriously do that and not die??????" and if everybody dose parkour that would contain much less significance.

17
North Dakota / Re: Haha
« on: January 07, 2009, 01:51:36 PM »
bro i am, and i have friends we are about a year into parkour dude, and i would love to train with new people, hit me up on my cell 701 318 1114, u can txt to

18
North Dakota / Re: NDSU Bison
« on: January 07, 2009, 01:49:57 PM »
yo hit me up!!!!!!!!!!! 701 318 1114, i text tooo

20
FAQ / Re: How to use the word Parkour
« on: January 07, 2009, 09:49:37 AM »
*drags the thread up from the grave*

Live! Liiiiive!

*lightning bolts*

Okay, now that that drama is out of the way, I'm going to unveil my utter geekdom here, and share the reasons you can't use parkour as a verb.

As stated, parkour is a noun. However, English turns nouns into verbs all the time. The process is called zero-conversion, zero-derivation (in the case of English), or verbification: when a language changes a word from one part of speech into a verb. For example, in English, "weird" is an adjective, but people often use it as a phrasal verb: "That guy totally weirded me out." Or email: "Send me an e-mail" vs. "E-mail me."

All languages engage in zero-conversion to a degree; English is particularly fond of verbification.

Given this, and English's propensity towards zero-conversion to verbs, why can't "parkour" be used as a verb?

Because le parkour is a French noun that has been borrowed from French. French does not zero-convert to verbs as readily as English does (although this is not always the case: verbs like "googliser"=to [look up on] Google, and the like crop up in French often enough. Worth noting is that "Google" itself is a borrowing into French, however it is a weak example as it is a proper noun for a product name, like Coca-Cola or Xerox, and is therefore generally unchanged language to language. Parkour is not a proper noun/brand name.)

All languages borrow from other languages as the need arises. "Need" is generally characterized by the introduction of a cultural element from one speech community to another, for which the receiving speech community has no equivalent. For instance, answer this question: What is the English translation for "burrito"? :P

In the case of parkour, no equivalent for parkour existed in English speech communities, so the name was imported along with the art form. This bond was further solidified by the application of "freerunning" as a possible English translation, and freerunning's subsequent philosophical/applicational split from parkour proper. The split necessitated a linguistic distinction between the two disciplines, handily already present via the inital borrowing of "parkour" into English.

That "parkour" is a borrowed noun is significant, because English typically doesn't zero-convert/verbify borrowed words. Support for this notion has already been given in previous posts with the examples "ballet" (also French), and "karate" (Japanese).

In French, the expression would be "faire du parkour"=to do parkour. French applies the verb "faire" (to do) to many, many physical activities. It's simply a characteristic of the language:

faire du bateau=to go boating
faire de la planche a voile=to windsurf
faire du roller en ligne=to rollerblade
faire du ski=to ski (although skier is also used as a single verb)
faire du cheval/de l'equitation=to go horseback riding/to ride horses

...etc.

So since "parkour" is a noun, verbified in French by means of a "faire construction" ("to do" construction), borrowed into English, which typically resists zero-converting borrowed words, we have no other choice but to say "to do/practice parkour" in English.

It is conceivable that in the future, English will zero-convert parkour into a verb; but in general that will depend much on whether it gains wide acceptance among English speech communities (to me, personally, it just sounds wrong, but that may be because I also speak French).

It is unlikely that French will verbify "parkour" for two reasons: one, because it is already in wide use with a faire construction, and two, because the noun "parkour" itself derived from the French verb "parcourir,"=to run across or through. So the verb "parkourir" is already taken (phonetically); "parkourer" might take root, but it's unlikely. The root verb is "courir"=to run; part of a specific verb class (-IR verbs like dormir), and although most verbification in French classifies verbs in the -ER verb class (the most common verb class), it is highly irregular/unlikely for a verb to "jump classes" like that.

So there you also have an actual linguistic explanation, and you probably also think I'm a huge nerd... which I am. :P

B.A., Linguistics, University of Wisconsin, 1998

*bows*

+1 my frind, I have the inteligence, yet not the pacience, kudos.

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