American Parkour Forum

Parkour and Freerunning => Parkour And Freerunning => Topic started by: Jeremiah Townsend on April 29, 2013, 05:06:23 AM

Title: Problems with long falls
Post by: Jeremiah Townsend on April 29, 2013, 05:06:23 AM
I'm having issues with my long falls. Recently I have gotten uber-good at rolls from standing position or running, or even dive rolling over obstacles. My issues spawn in drops over ten feet high. When I jump from anything under that I land on my feet, but when I jump from over ten feet I have too much momentum and lose control of the roll. This is very dangerous and I wish to fix it very fast. Advice?

Also, what position do rolls leave you in? My heels usually catch on the ground or I end up in a crouch.
Title: Re: Problems with long falls
Post by: Robert "McMuffin" Teets on April 29, 2013, 05:27:52 AM
Personally, I don't recommend taking long falls unless absolutely necessary, but I leave my rolls in more of a crouch. Make sure you have enough forward momentum to compensate for your downward momentum. It is near impossible to roll from a flat fall; or atleast it's impractical. 
Title: Re: Problems with long falls
Post by: Sam Dutton on April 29, 2013, 11:08:08 AM
Big drops have been known to be not so good for your knees, so you should definetly be thinking about that. But yeah, make sure you have a lot of forward momentum, and make sure your roll from smaller drops is perfect.
Title: Re: Problems with long falls
Post by: 7Erik7 on April 29, 2013, 11:14:44 AM
For how long have you been training parkour?
Title: Re: Problems with long falls
Post by: Jeremiah Townsend on April 29, 2013, 11:20:36 AM
I started dickin' around for fun when I was twelve, now I am fourteen and finally getting serious about my fitness and parkour.
Title: Re: Problems with long falls
Post by: Christopher De Bow on May 23, 2013, 12:02:15 PM
I've had similar problems with developing my rolls in the past.
Whenever I jumped from a high wall, my roll would be "forced".
In other words, I would have to force my body to roll instead of being "carried" into the roll by my momentum of the fall, which is what normally happens when you jump and land from a lower wall.

I searched for an explanation, and the best one I found was in this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JoBLxFKkbM (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JoBLxFKkbM)

Essentially, the problem boils down to actually jumping off the wall rather than dropping from it.
Hope this helps!
Title: Re: Problems with long falls
Post by: Jeremiah Townsend on May 23, 2013, 02:22:12 PM
I have dropped for a while, fixed that like a month ago.

I tightened up about a week ago, and now I am carried into the roll like you said.

My shoulder seems to drop into it instead of rolling into it, and I think one day I'm going to jump off a two storyer or something and my shoulder is going to break or dislocate or something.
Title: Re: Problems with long falls
Post by: 7Erik7 on May 25, 2013, 12:52:12 AM
I have dropped for a while, fixed that like a month ago.

I tightened up about a week ago, and now I am carried into the roll like you said.

My shoulder seems to drop into it instead of rolling into it, and I think one day I'm going to jump off a two storyer or something and my shoulder is going to break or dislocate or something.

You wrote that you have just started to get serious about fitness and parkour.

What I suggest is that you skip the 10f jumps and do conditioning exercises and practise smaller jumps in all forms. If you buy for instance The Parkour & Freerunning Handbook by Dan Edwardes then there is a a good amount of valuable information you will have available.

The reason why you may feel well when you are doing these jumps is because you're very young and you have just started doing them. Overruse injuries wont knock on your door...they tend to come as a clear bolt from the blue if you push to hard and then that's it, whenever its problem with ankles, knees, hips, back, shoulders... If you discolate your shoulder then there will be a recovery time and the risk that you discolate it again is even greater.

I was more or less in the same position as you back in 2007. I'm not trying to tell you how to train. It's just advice. And I suggest you take it seriously especially if you want to train parkour more than a few years.