Author Topic: Parkour in the olympics?!  (Read 8176 times)

Offline Matthew Lee Willis

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #40 on: May 07, 2008, 12:32:45 PM »
SelfFlow...did you read the rest of this thread at all?  This has been addressed several times.  Plus, what you just explained I am pretty sure is the actually free running competition that actually happened already.
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Offline Crosion_5

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #41 on: May 07, 2008, 02:41:43 PM »
I believe that there are huge benefits to competition.  Through competition can achieve a whole new level of training.  Competition gives us that drive of adrenaline.  I believe that without competition we cannot truly become as good as with it, because we are not only competing against ourselves, but others as well, and so we expect more of ourselves.

But competition in parkour?  I used to be nuetral, but now I am pretty much against it.  Parkour is special because it is non-competitive.  In every other aspect of life I am competing with other individuals.  Parkour is the only thing I have that involves solely a competition with myself.  It is just me and the obsticle.

Sorry if I am repeating anything.  I didn't read every other post.  I just don't want parkour to become the next big sport.  Soon it will mean nothing more than football and hockey.

Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #42 on: May 07, 2008, 04:02:11 PM »
Quote
I just don't want parkour to become the next big sport.

Too late ;)

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Offline Chris Kessler

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #43 on: May 07, 2008, 04:44:31 PM »
Yes I did Matthew. I did state in my post that I don't think anyone had put down exactly what I put down. The free running Red Bull event was just that, free running. No where did I say anything about free running. This type of event would showcase each traceur's ability to maneuver the environment their given in the amount of time they are given. It would not be measured solely on how someone could do a gainer wallflip. It would be about movement, not aesthetics.
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Offline Muhammad

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #44 on: May 07, 2008, 05:39:22 PM »
I didn't see much running at all in that red bull thingy. It was more like a tricking competition with multi-level surfaces and soft pads. Freerunning and parkour are supposed to be the same thing. The word "freerunning" was coined as an English translation of the French word "parkour". I don't know how it happened, but somehow there was some confusion along the way, and some people got the strange idea that "freerunning" was somehow different than "parkour", so now I think mostly in America, you have people thinking the freerunning is some hybrid combination of parkour and tricking.

Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #45 on: May 07, 2008, 06:06:34 PM »
Even though you are correct, they did start as terms for the same idea -Freerunning is now accepted as being different than parkour. They have different definitions, and these are both generally accepted. About two years ago I sent Sebastien's definition of Freerunning to Joss who was in charge of Pawa, who gave a statement (purportedly in the name of David's organization) about the difference between the two. I also asked Sebastien, as it was in PAWA's rights to define parkour, not Freerunning -Thus, it is more international than just American. Here's a link to the story -

PAWA Statement http://www.americanparkour.com/content/view/389/318/
Seb Statement http://www.americanparkour.com/content/view/701/318/

Seb has since updated his statement on what freerunning is - basically "Choosing your own path and not for aesthetics" and PAWA has long since disbanded and been basically denounced by David.
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Offline misstanyamae

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #46 on: May 07, 2008, 06:40:45 PM »
First of all, a parkour demo would be awesome to see at the olympics.

I do not like the idea of parkour as a competitive sport, at least not yet. Would you even call us second-generation traceurs? There is a lot for the world community to define (if we even decide to define it). Are any of us ready to be Olympic athletes? How many of us have been training for more than five years, ten years, more? I was five years old when I started figure skating and felt like I missed out on a lot of time to train. Sure, there a lot of sports where practitioners start later. But with something like parkour, imagine the potential of starting at five or earlier. I've read a lot about remembering how we used to move. Well, what if we never forgot? (I am not arguing for or against the advantages of early training.)

Maybe it would be cool to make parkour or freerunning a sport. I looked at the IOC website and found a lot of activities that don't seem competitive that actually are so. Lifesaving and orienteering, for example. I'm not sold though.
 
One of the main reasons I don't like competition is that sports like to separate men, women, sizes, weights, etc. I honestly like training with the guys, even if I can't always keep up... yet. I even have the option of finding another way to do something and I'm not penalized/deducted/criticized.

Another reason is that as I have gotten older I've grown more firm in the belief that there is always someone stronger or better, etc. In the end, you can only train for yourself and compete against yourself. Even if I'm training to jump as far or farther than someone else, I'm still trying to please myself.
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Offline Matthew Lee Willis

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #47 on: May 07, 2008, 09:23:26 PM »
I'm sorry Flow...I miss interpreted anything to do with the word style, as you used it, to be anything other then parkour.

Along with me and my ridiculously long article it said something really close to that.  Just not the same words.  Though, I am sorry for arguing with you.  I would really not like to argue.  Sorry, if I offended you.
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Offline Andrew Robillard

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #48 on: May 07, 2008, 11:59:02 PM »
One of the main reasons I don't like competition is that sports like to separate men, women, sizes, weights, etc. I honestly like training with the guys, even if I can't always keep up... yet. I even have the option of finding another way to do something and I'm not penalized/deducted/criticized.

Another reason is that as I have gotten older I've grown more firm in the belief that there is always someone stronger or better, etc. In the end, you can only train for yourself and compete against yourself. Even if I'm training to jump as far or farther than someone else, I'm still trying to please myself.

While its true that the actual "competition" if its created would be separated by gender that does not mean in the slightest that training would have to be separated. Look at the sport of track & field for example. If you go to almost any high school and most colleges in the nation the mens and womens team train together at the same time. I was even taught how to pole vault by a girl on the team and she was my main "competition" for 2 years. She was actually the one i pushed to be as good as. Just because a sports or art forms competition is separated by gender doesn't mean that men and women can't train together and learn from each other. I also think that it helps progress the sport as well. Not to sound sexist but a lot of men don't like to be worse at the sport/art that they do than a women so they will push themselves that much harder to become better than her and from what i've seen many women push themselves much harder when training with guys because they want to keep up and been seen as "equals" or just as good as the guys.

Theres also the fact that maybe someone on the team or in the group who is closest to skill level to you isn't the same gender. Its much easier to try to reach the level of the person slightly better than you than try to be the best right off the start. There's always going to be someone better than you and pushing to be at the same level they're at is one thing that helps to progress many sports/arts. If your a guy and that person happens to be a girl so what, try to be as good as her and once you are look to the next person, and try to be as good as them. Same goes for women.

Through competition can achieve a whole new level of training.  Competition gives us that drive of adrenaline.  I believe that without competition we cannot truly become as good as with it, because we are not only competing against ourselves, but others as well, and so we expect more of ourselves.

But competition in parkour?  I used to be nuetral, but now I am pretty much against it.  Parkour is special because it is non-competitive.  In every other aspect of life I am competing with other individuals.  Parkour is the only thing I have that involves solely a competition with myself.  It is just me and the obsticle.

Personally i think that competition would help to further the sport too but, it doesn't have to be absolute. Just because parkour becomes a competition doesn't mean everyone has to compete. It could just be something you do as a hobby or just to better yourself. Look at karate, judo, and taekwondo or even sports like skateboarding and snowboarding. Its true that they have national and international competitions, some even in the Olympics, but they are also activities that many people do just because they want to and never actually compete in.

Robillard, sadly your post will probably be ignored. It seems that many in the Parkour community would rather go on living with "what they fear" as their arguments instead of "what exists" - which seems very contrary to Parkour philosophy to me.

They fear that people will only compete for their own egos / to prove they are better than others - yet people who go to competitions don't relay this as factual in most cases.

I'm afraid it's all a bunch of bullshit :)

I know what you mean. Most people are afraid of change or the unknown. It can't really be helped until people see change as a new way to progress what they already do and overcome the fear of venturing into the unknown, both of which are extremely difficult.
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« Last Edit: May 08, 2008, 12:07:11 AM by Robillard »
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Offline terr0r

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #49 on: May 08, 2008, 04:26:34 AM »

Quote


I think your idea about going over a certain obstacle/s and timed makes sense.

At my gym, we already make up obstacle courses and time each other to see who can complete them the fastest. You exceed in some and don't do as well  in others, but in the end, it's hella fun.

i think they already have this... its called Ninja warrior.   j/k. but i agree with some people have the  "flow" better than other and should really be taken into consideration.



there is another show that was on a few years ago called "Viking: The Ultimate Obstacle Course", It was WAY better than Ninja Warrior, but its not on any more. It used o be on ESPN hahaha.

Offline Chris Kessler

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #50 on: May 08, 2008, 06:11:33 AM »
I was definitely not offended Matthew!! No worries!!

From the looks of the responses here, it seems that most people would like to see Parkour as a demo. It really does symbolize kind of a conglomeration of a few events in some ways. Running, hurdles, long jump, floor show, vaulting (duh), and many others. It would be a great coming together of different sports. In a way, parkour kind of symbolizes the Olympics (in very veryyyy broad terms).
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Offline Matt Carter

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #51 on: May 09, 2008, 12:57:15 PM »
Parkour in the olympics??? maybe as a entertainment, yes but not as a competitive sport.

Offline MiniRunner

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #52 on: May 10, 2008, 02:01:43 PM »
I dont agree with it.
Because loads of people are then going to find out about this and they're going to start and where ever you go you'll see them and there will be lots of injurys to small kids trying it and eventuall it will get taken from the olympics and will get a bad reputation. But worst case scenario it will get banned and against the law... :(

Offline Andrew Robillard

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #53 on: May 10, 2008, 02:55:06 PM »
I dont agree with it.
Because loads of people are then going to find out about this and they're going to start and where ever you go you'll see them and there will be lots of injurys to small kids trying it and eventuall it will get taken from the olympics and will get a bad reputation. But worst case scenario it will get banned and against the law... :(

I highly doubt that will happen. one example contrary to that would be bboying (breakdancing). The media destroyed it, during the time it was mainstream it was basically raped. But now its back to the underground and the people who are actually good. Anyways this is an obviously dangerous hobby which i'm sure many kids tried and got injured attempting when it was popular but it was never made illegal.

That being said, parkour is a movement of the body and a way of travel, it would be unconstitutional to make it illegal. It would be like making running illegal because it causes damage to your knees.

plus i highly doubt people at home would see someone jump from one building to another or do precisions and say "I can do that" and attempt it. Most kids that could injure themselves won't be capable of getting on the roof of a building and i doubt they would have the balance to get on a bar and make a precision. And if they are able to then maybe they should be doing parkour.  :P

Anyways your fear is sort of irrational although highly understandable. But take a moment to think about what you said and reevaluate it. See if it really makes sense to you and think about the possibility of it happening with all the "extreme sports" of today that are still around.
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Offline Chris Lyons

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #54 on: May 13, 2008, 04:24:10 AM »
I stand by whatever I said earlier... ;D
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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #55 on: May 18, 2008, 09:08:45 AM »
Everyone is entitled to an opinion therefore i shall shed my light to this column! Parkour at least i thought was supposed to be a pure sport where trainees developed skill for themselves to further help people in bad situations or in order to get from here to there efficiently. Now if the olympics came into play all the wrong people would most likely be exposed to parkour and crash its total philosophy then causing another episode of no bodies calling it free style walking, freestyle running, jump trials and all these ridiculos names! Keep it pure and leave parkour as it is  >:(

Offline Andrew Robillard

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #56 on: May 18, 2008, 10:14:26 AM »
http://www.americanparkour.com/smf/index.php?topic=10010.0;topicseen

these two topics seem to be getting more and more in contradiction with each other. I've noticed an increased number of people in this threading complaining that they don't want people to see parkour and go oh thats cool, i think i'll try it. Shouldn't we be encouraging more people to try parkour, even if they get into it for the wrong reasons at  first they will eventually discover the philosophy and other things for themselves.  ;)

IMO parkour should be open to everyone, the people that stick with it will understand its philosophy and the "wrong type of people" will eventually get bored and stop.
"With the will and the passion impossible is nothing."

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Offline BearMills

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #57 on: May 20, 2008, 11:08:30 AM »
im w/ it I kinda like the idea.. Though what they should do is give them an obstacle course and base it on gettin to the area fastest, and other event of creativity! any thoughts
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Offline Chris Lyons

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Re: Parkour in the olympics?!
« Reply #58 on: May 23, 2008, 04:37:06 AM »
Im going to go with my earlyer post  ;D
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