Author Topic: How to use the word Parkour  (Read 42803 times)

Offline Ryan Ford

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How to use the word Parkour
« on: February 20, 2006, 10:11:38 AM »
I've noticed a lot of newer people misusing the word parkour. Here are some examples of what to do and what not to do.

INCORRECT: I am going parkouring outside.

CORRECT: I am going to do parkour outside.
_______________________________________________________

INCORRECT: Look at that parkourist jumping over the wall.

CORRECT: Look at that traceur jumping over the wall.

That's all for now. I will edit this post if I or anyone else thinks of more examples.
_______________________________________________________

INCORRECT: That gainer so parkoury!

CORRECT: That gainer was NOT parkour!  :P
« Last Edit: February 20, 2006, 06:31:08 PM by Demon »

Offline The Manilla Gorilla

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2006, 01:40:04 PM »
hahaha, good post im giving you some karma for that


 My Question: do i say
 HEY do you want to go do some parkour
                   or
 Hey you want to parkour
                   or
 who cares thats a minor difference anyway

Offline jmanndriver

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2006, 03:01:19 PM »

CORRECT: I am going to do parkour outside.


I would say it is to do.
Parkour isn't a sport, it's a way of life...

Offline Asa Liebmann

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2006, 03:07:15 PM »
Parkour is only a noun.

No matter how smooth one tries to be with it, (ie "Let's go Parkour tomorrow" or my favorite "That gainer was so Parkoury") one will fail at making it into any other part of speech. It just isn't right.

Thanks Demon +1
« Last Edit: February 20, 2006, 10:17:09 PM by Asa »

Offline Josh Klute

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2006, 08:39:45 PM »
YES!, I've was so close to making a topic almost exactly like this, since It is pretty confusing for me.  I know that parkour is a noun, but is there a verb that is acceptable?  My guess is no (or people would be using it left and right on this site), but it's always work asking since "parkouring" just makes you sound like a retard ;).  I think that this is one of the main reasons why freerunning has caught on so much.  It is much easier to say "I'm gonna go freerunning" instead of "I'm gonna go do some parkour".  Plus the fact that unedjumicated people tend to understand "freerunning" better then parkour.  Now I am in no way defending freerunnning, I'm just stating that it is kinda annoying not having a verb for parkour.  Don't deny it, the rest of you have probably felt at least a tiny bit of annoyance over this ;), at least I hope so, so I'm not being a total freak ;).
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Offline Asa Liebmann

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2006, 10:19:05 PM »
Parkour is a proper noun, much like Ballet, or Karate.

You wouldn't say "I Karated at the dojo" or "Everyone in the studio was Balleting."

Or for something even more applicable: Football. One doesn't Football, one plays, practices, watches, or enjoys Football. There is no such thing as "Footballing" and nobody ever "Footballed."

So, we practice, train, use, enjoy, and sometimes discuss (to a lesser extent than the others, I would hope) Parkour.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2006, 10:23:45 PM by Asa »

Offline Josh Klute

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2006, 10:49:29 PM »
Ok, then I'll just have to deal with there being no verb for parkour ;).  I never really noticed that there were so many common things out there that have no real verb. 

In a few minutes here I will do some parkour right up to my bed ;) 

“All around you people will be tip-toeing through life, just to arrive at death safely.  But dear children, do not tiptoe.  Run, hop, skip, or dance, just don’t tiptoe.”

Offline Phraughe

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2006, 03:34:09 PM »
I don't know, on some other sites I have heard parkouriste, or something of the sort.  That could be and old term that isn't used or something, though.

Offline LockDown

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2006, 06:57:49 PM »
 ;D :P :D ;D
some of my friends say this to me it bugged at first but then after they realized that you cant do that ( because it was a noun) they did it anyway as a joke it amuses me now. they say thing like "hey go parkour that wall!"

Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2007, 04:32:50 PM »
*drags the thread up from the grave*

Live! Liiiiive!

*lightning bolts*

Okay, now that that drama is out of the way, I'm going to unveil my utter geekdom here, and share the reasons you can't use parkour as a verb.

As stated, parkour is a noun. However, English turns nouns into verbs all the time. The process is called zero-conversion, zero-derivation (in the case of English), or verbification: when a language changes a word from one part of speech into a verb. For example, in English, "weird" is an adjective, but people often use it as a phrasal verb: "That guy totally weirded me out." Or email: "Send me an e-mail" vs. "E-mail me."

All languages engage in zero-conversion to a degree; English is particularly fond of verbification.

Given this, and English's propensity towards zero-conversion to verbs, why can't "parkour" be used as a verb?

Because le parkour is a French noun that has been borrowed from French. French does not zero-convert to verbs as readily as English does (although this is not always the case: verbs like "googliser"=to [look up on] Google, and the like crop up in French often enough. Worth noting is that "Google" itself is a borrowing into French, however it is a weak example as it is a proper noun for a product name, like Coca-Cola or Xerox, and is therefore generally unchanged language to language. Parkour is not a proper noun/brand name.)

All languages borrow from other languages as the need arises. "Need" is generally characterized by the introduction of a cultural element from one speech community to another, for which the receiving speech community has no equivalent. For instance, answer this question: What is the English translation for "burrito"? :P

In the case of parkour, no equivalent for parkour existed in English speech communities, so the name was imported along with the art form. This bond was further solidified by the application of "freerunning" as a possible English translation, and freerunning's subsequent philosophical/applicational split from parkour proper. The split necessitated a linguistic distinction between the two disciplines, handily already present via the inital borrowing of "parkour" into English.

That "parkour" is a borrowed noun is significant, because English typically doesn't zero-convert/verbify borrowed words. Support for this notion has already been given in previous posts with the examples "ballet" (also French), and "karate" (Japanese).

In French, the expression would be "faire du parkour"=to do parkour. French applies the verb "faire" (to do) to many, many physical activities. It's simply a characteristic of the language:

faire du bateau=to go boating
faire de la planche a voile=to windsurf
faire du roller en ligne=to rollerblade
faire du ski=to ski (although skier is also used as a single verb)
faire du cheval/de l'equitation=to go horseback riding/to ride horses

...etc.

So since "parkour" is a noun, verbified in French by means of a "faire construction" ("to do" construction), borrowed into English, which typically resists zero-converting borrowed words, we have no other choice but to say "to do/practice parkour" in English.

It is conceivable that in the future, English will zero-convert parkour into a verb; but in general that will depend much on whether it gains wide acceptance among English speech communities (to me, personally, it just sounds wrong, but that may be because I also speak French).

It is unlikely that French will verbify "parkour" for two reasons: one, because it is already in wide use with a faire construction, and two, because the noun "parkour" itself derived from the French verb "parcourir,"=to run across or through. So the verb "parkourir" is already taken (phonetically); "parkourer" might take root, but it's unlikely. The root verb is "courir"=to run; part of a specific verb class (-IR verbs like dormir), and although most verbification in French classifies verbs in the -ER verb class (the most common verb class), it is highly irregular/unlikely for a verb to "jump classes" like that.

So there you also have an actual linguistic explanation, and you probably also think I'm a huge nerd... which I am. :P

B.A., Linguistics, University of Wisconsin, 1998

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She followed slowly, taking a long time,
as though there were some obstacle in the way;
and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
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Offline Blarg

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2007, 12:14:42 PM »
Holy Freakin' crap, Muse! I'm giving you karma just for the fact that you typed that much  :D And I'm going to go ahead and say that it was a great post even though I haven't read it yet, but I shall. That just kinda blew my mind for a sec.
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Offline Cliff Boz

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2007, 04:24:07 AM »
Muse:

I... I think I love you. (lol)

(Bit of a linguaphile, here, myself) :)

Also: ncparkour.com
North Carolina Traceurs

Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #12 on: June 22, 2007, 08:26:19 AM »
Holy Freakin' crap, Muse! I'm giving you karma just for the fact that you typed that much  :D And I'm going to go ahead and say that it was a great post even though I haven't read it yet, but I shall. That just kinda blew my mind for a sec.

Heh. I tend to write a lot. Not sure how much I actually say, but there are usually a lot of words there. ;) Thanks for the karma.

Muse:

I... I think I love you. (lol)

(Bit of a linguaphile, here, myself) :)

*blushes*

I'm flattered. And glad to meet a fellow "Word Nerd." ;)
She followed slowly, taking a long time,
as though there were some obstacle in the way;
and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
--excerpt from Going Blind, Rainer Maria Rilke

www.madisonparkour.com

Offline Holland Wilson

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2007, 05:21:45 PM »
Sorry for re-resurrecting the thread, but I think I have a valid question.

It is unlikely that French will verbify "parkour" for two reasons: one, because it is already in wide use with a faire construction, and two, because the noun "parkour" itself derived from the French verb "parcourir,"=to run across or through. So the verb "parkourir" is already taken (phonetically); "parkourer" might take root, but it's unlikely. The root verb is "courir"=to run; part of a specific verb class (-IR verbs like dormir), and although most verbification in French classifies verbs in the -ER verb class (the most common verb class), it is highly irregular/unlikely for a verb to "jump classes" like that.
It doesn't seem to me that French needs to verbify "parkour" if they have "parkourir". They could just use that verb as a verb for the sport, in contexts having to do with the sport. The definition is certainly appropriate.

In your opinion, what would be the likelihood of the English community taking/mutating "parkourir" as a verb? I've taken to thinking of it as "running", but it's obviously more than that ("running across or through", though, describes it fairly well.)

Or for something even more applicable: Football. One doesn't Football, one plays, practices, watches, or enjoys Football. There is no such thing as "Footballing" and nobody ever "Footballed."
Correction: the British football. And these footballers can be said to be footballing and to have footballed. Of course, it's a different football than what you hear in America mostly, but it's a more correct application of the word "foot" as a part of the name. Sorry, but nobody is awesome enough to deserve to use American football in an argument while being nit-picky about words.
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Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2007, 08:29:47 AM »
One couldn't use "parkourir" as a verb for the sport because it's homophonous with "parcourir"=to traverse/run through. Normally language gets around homophonic confusion via context; however parcourir and parkourir would be used in totally identical contexts:

My friend hears me say "Ce week-end, je vais parkourir/parcourir le Bois de Boulogne," and, knowing I am a traceuse, has no idea if I intend to traverse the Bois de Boulogne via a simple run, or using parkour.

He/she responds, "Tu vas parcourir, ou parkourir?" (recall that parcourir and parkourir are 100% homophonous)

"Je vais par[k]ourir."

As you can see, this isn't going to work. ;-)

As French already has a strong class of "sport/activity" nouns that verbify via the use of a faire construction, "faire du parkour" is the structure French uses for the verb.

English speakers have already started mutating "parkour" (the noun) into a verb, because English doesn't make use of pesky articles as strictly as French does, so nouns verbify very easily in English. There is no reason for English to turn "parkourir" into a verb because said verb doesn't exist (and likely won't).

The point of the thread initially was to stress the fact that "parkour" should not be a verb in any language, based on the philosophical understanding that parkour is something one does, something one practices, but it is not an "action" (in the sense that a verb is an action) in and of itself. As philosophy/semantics tend to be sketchy territory (IMO) on which to base linguistic prescription, I was merely backing it up with linguistic facts.

Ordinarily I'm not much of a prescriptive linguist, but the use of parkour as a verb just grates on me; probably because I have a lot personally invested in the idea of parkour. Admittedly, it's not terribly rational or impartial; but I do think there is significant impartial evidence to support the position that parkour should not be used as a verb.
She followed slowly, taking a long time,
as though there were some obstacle in the way;
and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
--excerpt from Going Blind, Rainer Maria Rilke

www.madisonparkour.com

Offline Derik (QuikSilva) DaSilva

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #15 on: July 18, 2008, 08:06:38 AM »
Okay. So how about we conclude this thread? I understand you can't say 'I'm gonna go parkour.' or 'I just got done parkouring'. I do say, "I'm going to go do parkour. I'll be back later." but the only other thing I can think of using it in past tense is "I just got done jamming." But a jam has to have two or more people right? So how do you use parkour in the past tense?

Question:
"Hey man, where were you?"

Answer:
"I was out parkouring." -WRONG
"I just got done jamming." -WRONG (I was alone)
"___________________." What is right?

Offline Iceucold

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2008, 01:33:32 PM »
Okay. So how about we conclude this thread? I understand you can't say 'I'm gonna go parkour.' or 'I just got done parkouring'. I do say, "I'm going to go do parkour. I'll be back later." but the only other thing I can think of using it in past tense is "I just got done jamming." But a jam has to have two or more people right? So how do you use parkour in the past tense?

Question:
"Hey man, where were you?"

Answer:
"I was out parkouring." -WRONG
"I just got done jamming." -WRONG (I was alone)
"___________________." What is right?

I just finished/got done...
training.
drilling.
perfecting my skills in the discipline of parkour.
OR ... out busting my ass conditioning. Where were you?? <-- my personal favorite. :)
Abs Patentia Veni Perfectio.

If it doesn't have four legs or fly, *expletive deleted* it.

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Offline AirGear

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #17 on: July 19, 2008, 07:34:09 PM »
IM WIth him (wow this was a useless post my bad) l

Offline Vinny Pellegrini

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2008, 10:26:29 AM »
holy crap muse. you get an A for knowing your shit. and some kharma too
the floor is lavA!

Offline Zach Hu Zerdaty

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Re: How to use the word Parkour
« Reply #19 on: January 07, 2009, 09:49:37 AM »
*drags the thread up from the grave*

Live! Liiiiive!

*lightning bolts*

Okay, now that that drama is out of the way, I'm going to unveil my utter geekdom here, and share the reasons you can't use parkour as a verb.

As stated, parkour is a noun. However, English turns nouns into verbs all the time. The process is called zero-conversion, zero-derivation (in the case of English), or verbification: when a language changes a word from one part of speech into a verb. For example, in English, "weird" is an adjective, but people often use it as a phrasal verb: "That guy totally weirded me out." Or email: "Send me an e-mail" vs. "E-mail me."

All languages engage in zero-conversion to a degree; English is particularly fond of verbification.

Given this, and English's propensity towards zero-conversion to verbs, why can't "parkour" be used as a verb?

Because le parkour is a French noun that has been borrowed from French. French does not zero-convert to verbs as readily as English does (although this is not always the case: verbs like "googliser"=to [look up on] Google, and the like crop up in French often enough. Worth noting is that "Google" itself is a borrowing into French, however it is a weak example as it is a proper noun for a product name, like Coca-Cola or Xerox, and is therefore generally unchanged language to language. Parkour is not a proper noun/brand name.)

All languages borrow from other languages as the need arises. "Need" is generally characterized by the introduction of a cultural element from one speech community to another, for which the receiving speech community has no equivalent. For instance, answer this question: What is the English translation for "burrito"? :P

In the case of parkour, no equivalent for parkour existed in English speech communities, so the name was imported along with the art form. This bond was further solidified by the application of "freerunning" as a possible English translation, and freerunning's subsequent philosophical/applicational split from parkour proper. The split necessitated a linguistic distinction between the two disciplines, handily already present via the inital borrowing of "parkour" into English.

That "parkour" is a borrowed noun is significant, because English typically doesn't zero-convert/verbify borrowed words. Support for this notion has already been given in previous posts with the examples "ballet" (also French), and "karate" (Japanese).

In French, the expression would be "faire du parkour"=to do parkour. French applies the verb "faire" (to do) to many, many physical activities. It's simply a characteristic of the language:

faire du bateau=to go boating
faire de la planche a voile=to windsurf
faire du roller en ligne=to rollerblade
faire du ski=to ski (although skier is also used as a single verb)
faire du cheval/de l'equitation=to go horseback riding/to ride horses

...etc.

So since "parkour" is a noun, verbified in French by means of a "faire construction" ("to do" construction), borrowed into English, which typically resists zero-converting borrowed words, we have no other choice but to say "to do/practice parkour" in English.

It is conceivable that in the future, English will zero-convert parkour into a verb; but in general that will depend much on whether it gains wide acceptance among English speech communities (to me, personally, it just sounds wrong, but that may be because I also speak French).

It is unlikely that French will verbify "parkour" for two reasons: one, because it is already in wide use with a faire construction, and two, because the noun "parkour" itself derived from the French verb "parcourir,"=to run across or through. So the verb "parkourir" is already taken (phonetically); "parkourer" might take root, but it's unlikely. The root verb is "courir"=to run; part of a specific verb class (-IR verbs like dormir), and although most verbification in French classifies verbs in the -ER verb class (the most common verb class), it is highly irregular/unlikely for a verb to "jump classes" like that.

So there you also have an actual linguistic explanation, and you probably also think I'm a huge nerd... which I am. :P

B.A., Linguistics, University of Wisconsin, 1998

*bows*

+1 my frind, I have the inteligence, yet not the pacience, kudos.
Peace - Zach Hu Zerdaty.