Author Topic: Patellar Tendinitis (jumper knee)  (Read 2316 times)

Offline Ozzi

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Patellar Tendinitis (jumper knee)
« on: March 07, 2008, 07:59:48 PM »

 I wanted to share this with most people out there, since this the most common injury that we might encounter if improper training.

 I am going through it right now, it sucks and I woulnt want anyone to go thru it.

 Condition, condition, condition, progress slowly but steadily.

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 Patellar tendinitis or "jumper's knee" is a condition resulting from overuse of the knee. The patellar tendon is a structure that attaches the quadriceps muscle group to the tibia (shin bone). The patella (knee cap) is a sesamoid (floating bone) incorporated into the patellar tendon. The patellar tendon is also referred to as the patellar ligament; some anatomists believe that since this structure connects the patella to tibia it should be classified as a ligament. Ligaments connect bone to bone while tendons connect muscles to bone.

Tendinitis is simply the inflammation of a tendon. This can be due to numerous factors. Some of the more common factors associated with this condition are:

a rapid increase in the frequency of training, 
sudden increase in the intensity of training, 
transition from one training method to another, 
repeated training on a rigid surface, 
improper mechanics during training, 
genetic abnormalities of the knee joint, and/or
poor base strength of the quad muscles.
Any or all of these factors can lead to the development of patellar tendinitis.

Basketball players are the most common athletes to experience this problem. Many athletes will make a transition from football to basketball during the school year. These two sports place entirely different stresses on the knee joint. The transition itself may be the only factor contributing to the condition.  Other factors in these athletes may include: a change in training surface, increased amounts of continuous running and/or jumping, and the pounding associated with football.

The signs and symptoms of patellar tendinitis are fairly easy to detect.  The athlete will complain of:
pain in the area of the tendon, 
the knee will often feel "tight," 
pain will be experienced early in the workout and after the workout is completed,
there may be some subtle swelling of the tendon, and 
the athlete may feel that the tendon is "squeaking."
Treatment of this condition begins with continuation of a general fitness and flexibility program. The best treatment is prevention! The multi-sport athlete should utilize proper conditioning techniques to ease the transition from one sport to another. Proper conditioning should include aerobic fitness, lower body strength training, and lower body flexibility training. Flexibility is very important in preventing overuse injuries such as patellar tendinitis.

Once the condition  is present, there are several treatment options. The athlete is strongly encouraged to remain active in practice as well as rehabilitation so that he/she will not detrain, fail to keep up on the offensive and defensive schemes of the game, and most importantly loose the mental drive to compete. The rehabilitation should be designed to decrease the symptoms, strengthen the muscles of the quad region and improve hamstring and quad flexibility.

Also, factors that may pre-dispose the athlete to this injury should be isolated and corrected. This could be as simple as improving the conditioning of the athlete (e.g. non-pounding conditioning such as interval training on a bicycle rather than running). If the tendinitis is due to a strength imbalance in the quadriceps and hamstrings, the athlete should begin exercises to target the weak muscles of the quads or hamstrings.

A General Rehabilitation Program Should Include
Non-impact aerobic conditioning,
Flexibility  training for quadriceps and hamstring muscle groups,
Decrease in predisposing factors,
Use of physician prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications,
Use of theraputic modalities, such as: Ultrasound, Electric Muscle Stimulation, or Iontophoresis*,
Cryotherapy (ice massage or ice packs),
Strengthening exercises, such as: leg press, side step-ups, and mini squats, and
Return to full competition as symptoms allow.
* These treatments must be prescribed by a physician and performed by the licensed health care professionals such as Athletic Trainers.

Treating this condition begins with prevention through a structured off-season, in-season, and transition season. Once the tendinitis occurs one must first recognize the predisposing factors, whether it is the repeated pounding of running on a poor floor, rapid increase in jumping, or a strength imbalance. If this condition goes unchecked, the tendon may form scar tissue in the irritated area, resulting in a career of fighting off the tendinitis whenever there is an increase in volume or intensity of the training sessions.
 


 Here is the atual link

 http://www.athleticadvisor.com/Injuries/LE/Knee/patellar_tendinitis.htm
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Offline Steve Low

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Re: Patellar Tendinitis (jumper knee)
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2008, 08:17:28 PM »
Tendonitis of the patellar tendon/ligament is very closely related to Osgood Schlatter's as well since it's when the attachment to the tibial tuberosity starts to pull away/avulsion fracture from the bone.

These are two different diagnoses so trying to diagnose yourself is probably generally a bad idea. Both are generally solved by just more rest and maybe some strengthening and massage. So if it's in the area and can or is getting progressively worse the best idea is to STOP and rest (like most other injuries).
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Offline Ozzi

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Re: Patellar Tendinitis (jumper knee)
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2008, 11:29:32 PM »

 You are right Steve, I probably shouldn't be diagnosing myself, but based of this and other articles I read, symptoms, causes and everything seems to all point to the same. So I feel pretty confident to say this might be it.

 The main purpose of the thread though is to continue to emphasize the fact of the need for constant conditioning, now a days with so PK info on line about how to learn PK people skips the importance of conditioning and go right straight for the technique and big stuff.

 Thanks for your concern bro, I really appreciate it.
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Offline Charles Moreland

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Re: Patellar Tendinitis (jumper knee)
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2008, 01:06:01 AM »
I understand your plea for conditioning. However, I'll go as far as to say you worded it poorly. Context can easily get misconstrued.

A skill/technique can easily be used for conditioning. Someone can do several thousand ground level landings to condition the knees. Spread this training method out over a couple of months and you have a steady level way to train mechanics and condition the body for that type of stress all in one. The key isn't conditioning, it's proper conditioning.

You're still relatively new and previous background can only go so far. Take some time off the heavy stress inducers and use the time to develop and re-evaluate your training method so hopefully you can avoid anything like this in the future. I'm sure you still want to be flipping for many more years to come!

Get well soon.

Offline Steve Low

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Re: Patellar Tendinitis (jumper knee)
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2008, 04:23:11 AM »
Oh I wasn't talking about you Ozzi just in general.. but if it applies. ;)
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Offline Ozzi

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Re: Patellar Tendinitis (jumper knee)
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2008, 12:48:32 PM »
I understand your plea for conditioning. However, I'll go as far as to say you worded it poorly. Context can easily get misconstrued.

A skill/technique can easily be used for conditioning. Someone can do several thousand ground level landings to condition the knees. Spread this training method out over a couple of months and you have a steady level way to train mechanics and condition the body for that type of stress all in one. The key isn't conditioning, it's proper conditioning.

You're still relatively new and previous background can only go so far. Take some time off the heavy stress inducers and use the time to develop and re-evaluate your training method so hopefully you can avoid anything like this in the future. I'm sure you still want to be flipping for many more years to come!

Get well soon.

Conditioning, proper conditioning, I just want to make sure everyone understands the importance of conditioning your body to get ready for the intensity of some of the techniques. But you are right, it doesn't matter how much you conditioning, if you don't condition accordingly with what you body will be needing then you are not being smart about it. Reason why my conditioning is 90% PK related only. I rarely do the common exercises most people would do.

Now a days someone can just go online, learn the techniques and go out and get them down, well the problem with that is, then the body has to catch up with the intense impact it is taking, making it more difficult for strength development and technique to go along. 20 years ago when David Belle and the others (Sebastian, Yamakasi etc) started training they had nowhere to learn from, they had to get in tune with their body to discover the prospers ways to overcome obstacles, this was giving time to the body to gain the strength needed while they kept discovering this techniques.

People forget about that and go for the big moves. You are absolutely right, previous training can only go so far, I learned that. My techniques is fine, my flow and strength are also reliable but since I never practiced any sports that put impact on my knees the way PK does, regardless of the rest of my body being somewhat prepared my knees weren't, reason why I insist people to understand that it doesn't matter how great you think your technique is, it is a matter or overall body conditioning, proper conditioning, strength training and joint strengthening.

 We can assume that because we are strong, we can just go out and do all this things we have never done before.
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Offline Ozzi

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Re: Patellar Tendinitis (jumper knee)
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2008, 12:50:49 PM »
Oh I wasn't talking about you Ozzi just in general.. but if it applies. ;)

Well yeah, I did diagnose myself, the bad thing about that is I didnt get to be trated by the hot nurse, and my wife is out of town, dang it. But the pro though, is I didnt have to wait 3 hours in the boring waiting room reading magazines.  ;D
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