Author Topic: We try parkour: Exercise like a superhero  (Read 202 times)

Offline yariimehdii

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We try parkour: Exercise like a superhero
« on: January 26, 2019, 05:19:38 AM »
Stephen Heard overcame some obstacles and entertained some strangers during his first attempt at parkour.
THE BASICS
Often considered by onlookers as aimless leaping, climbing and commando rolling, parkour was officially recognised as a sport in Great Britain this year. Sport NZ also acknowledged Parkour NZ as the national organisation for the activity. It's making leaps and bounds.
Parkour participants have control of the obstacles and intensity that they want to practice ? so that doesn't mean you need to leap between buildings during your first session.
STEPHEN HEARD
Parkour participants have control of the obstacles and intensity that they want to practice ? so that doesn't mean you need to leap between buildings during your first session.
Born from military obstacle course training and popularised by online videos, parkour uses enhanced and superhuman movements, like leaping, climbing and rolling, to tackle natural and manmade obstacles, like stairwells, walls and curbs. For my parkour debut I was told to bring an open mind and to wear light, non-restrictive clothing.
The beauty of parkour is that it's not confined to any one location. No pitch, no court, no rink; it's acrobatic and creative free-movement that can be done practically anywhere obstacles present themselves. On this occasion, I would be completing an informal, introductory "jam" at Auckland's Victoria Park, a bonafide parkour playground complete with leap-able boulders, a skate park with numerous ledges and ramps to hang and swing, and a humungous log screaming to be jumped off. But before all that I had to learn the fundamental parkour safety roll which is used to minimise impact on the body upon landing.
For my first attempt I started from a kneeling position, before rolling forward onto my forearm and following through across the shoulder and back ? effectively taking the childhood forward roll and streamlining it so there's more control and limited pressure on the neck and head. With a loose version of the safety roll under my belt, it was time to confront some obstacles with dynamic movement. Think: balancing on wooden bollards, vaulting over a power box and attempting to hop between those boulders. Bystanders seemed very confused that two grown men were repeatedly  صندلی فلزی   میز فلزی  leaping over a grey metal cube ? self-consciousness is another obstacle for participants to get over.
The main event would be to jump and transition into a safety roll from the giant log. My first landing threw the rulebook out the window and resulted in a solid impact from the feet to knees. The second was more of a step-by-step run through than one fluid motion. It would do in this instance.
WHY YOU SHOULD TRY IT
Who knew that hopping between rocks could be so physically demanding? Parkour is a full body discipline and the days following my muscles certainly let me know about it. Parkour NZ CEO Damien Puddle says fitness isn't the core purpose of parkour.
"Sustained parkour training certainly increases people's fitness, but as a lifestyle sport (akin to surfing, snowboarding, skateboarding, BMX, etc.) the physical benefits often come secondary to other motivations for participation." He also states that the preparation for parkour is "more about mental preparation (e.g. doing things outside in front of others) and attitude (e.g. not comparing yourself to others)."
RISK RATING
Because parkour comes with such an open brief, participants have control of the obstacles and intensity that they want to practice ? so that doesn't mean you need to leap between buildings during your first session. Like any physical activity there is a risk of injury with parkour. Damien Puddle says that "scrapes, bumps and bruises are part of the territory."
"Serious injuries are few and far between if you train at your level. You're in control of your body and your actions, so you get to choose the obstacles, you get to choose the movements, and you get to choose the intensity level at which you train. That means if you're uncomfortable with something you can just say no."