Author Topic: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17  (Read 6827 times)

Offline TK17

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Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« on: November 26, 2007, 11:58:25 AM »
Having spent the last two and a half years on this project, I could probably fill up a dozen pages talking about it, and how I made it, and why I made certain choices, and what the video means to me.  If people are interested in hearing that stuff, I'll come back and say it.  But as it is, I think the video speaks for itself.

Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n3kaHBUs-2A
Download: http://www.megaupload.com/?d=VR6J706I

The following is an "unedited" copy of the video, composed of unaltered raw footage including natural sound, for anyone who is willing to take the time to offer serious criticism or advice on my technique.  I consider myself thoroughly average in the world of parkour, a very intermediate traceur, and as such, I'm well aware that I have room for improvement in a lot of ways, and I'm eager for your help:

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=LPELHBEX

Any and all comments are welcome, and the more in-depth they are the more they'll be appreciated ... I'd rather read a thousand words telling me how terrible it is than see a one-liner that just says "Hey, good job!"

Thanks,
-TK17
« Last Edit: November 26, 2007, 03:20:35 PM by TK17 »

Offline Laurie Jennifer

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2007, 12:12:51 PM »
I applaud your speed and flow.  And those were some *tight* pop vaults.  It was like you did an underbar... without a bar!  Very impressive stuff, especially because it was all done with such control.  None of it seemed showy or like you were "performing for the camera."  You know how some guys you can tell are stretching beyond their limits in hopes of makes a better YouTube video?  Yeah, that wasn't you at ALL.  It was clear that everything you were doing had been meticulously trained.  Even your running form was perfect, and that's so crucial.  That shot of you running at the beginning, that won me over right there.

Thank you for being a living demonstration of good training technique.  Keep it up!

PS-Awesome editing skills on the film itself, Parkour aside.
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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2007, 12:32:13 PM »
First thing im gonna say is that your editing was great, not sure about song choice, but REALLY good editing.  Now the actual parkour seemed pretty good too.  There were a few vaults i saw that looked like they could be tightened up a bit, i think they were speeds but im not sure now, sorry.  But i mean when u were going over u kinda paused halfway thru like u werent sure wat u were doing.  I know i do this a lot myself and im tryin to get rid of it.  Other than that muy bueno.  Looks like u drill one thing till u got it "perfect" before moving on, and thats what u should do (i think) so yeah, good work and learn some new stuff ;) great underbars by the way

Offline Cblock

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2007, 01:38:45 PM »
bravo

Offline Ryan Ford

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2007, 02:12:57 PM »
constructive criticism:

2:32, 2:35 - Climb ups could be faster and more symmetrical. There were some better climb ups later in the video though...
2:48, 4:23 - Air posture could be tighter, more relaxed, and more controlled. For example, pull the knees up higher and relax/control your body more symmetrically. Doing this probably has more aesthetic value than  it actually makes something more efficient, but I would argue that it improves both at leas somewhat.
3:29 - This looks pretty high and far and I think I would've aimed for more power and height to ensure a safe landing. To do this, I would have pulled with my arms higher and stepped up with my push off foot higher. But it looks like you landed it ok so maybe it wasn't necessary.
3:40 - Looks like a rough landing although it was a pretty huge tic tac. With that in consideration, I think you landed it good, but not great. Maybe lead with your legs a little more so you are more ready for the impact.
4:43 - Slight hesitation after the underbar could be improved.
4:49 - The plant up on the wall looked timid. I probable would've done it carefully too though, looks like a big drop!

I was mainly just nitpicking though. I had to look hard to find constructive criticism, but I think its always important to improve upon everything.

Moving on to the good things. I loved how you put a lot of time, effort, and meaning into a "sampler" video. I liked how it was a video based on parkour movement, but also managed to communicate some of the more subtle aspects of parkour like creativity, work ethic, and passion. I've been thinking of making a video along the same lines for a while now but haven't gotten around to starting it. So I admire that you were able to successfully finish a great one!

Where are the locations in the video? Looks like you have found some good ones.

I enjoyed the shots of multiple movements in the same place. It shows that you are being creative and truly thinking about adapting to what is at hand, rather than forcing and matching certain movements with certain obstacles like so many people tend to do.

Like others have said, it was obvious that you have drilled most of those movements over and over to get them as close to perfection as you can. I admire the work ethic and determination it takes to do that because I see a lot of people successfully do something only a few times until they move on to something else out of boredom or a lack of an attention span. Like in gymnastics, virtuosity in parkour is rare and a very fine, difficult line to cross over, but I think you managed to do so in some of your movements!

The P.O.V. camera was cool. How did you rig that up?
« Last Edit: November 26, 2007, 02:17:04 PM by Demon »

Offline Michael Zernow

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2007, 03:13:09 PM »
First off I completely agree with everyone that this was a well filmed video with an excellent display of ability.

The only question I have is of the "parkour-only" definition. Now perhaps I'm wrong but I feel like this is something that has bothered me in many other circumstances. Movements such as the underbar at 3:20 or the tic tac at 3:13 you say are included as parkour because they help divert your momentum but to me it seems like you are 1) adding a 270 degree spin to what could simply be a 90 degree turn, and 2) that you're performing a technique when simply continuing on your way by simply angling your run earlier on would avoid the situation, saving time and energy. Now especially in this situations where you describe foreknowledge of the areas wouldn't it just be easier to turn instead of adding a superfluous movement?

But this isn't to specifically come down on you, perhaps you do have an explanation as to why different extra movements were added in these situations, but my point is that I think that a lot people look over extraneous movement if it's not distinctly a freerunning technique. Videos like Blane's "Docendo Discimus" are great examples of training for parkour but they also include freerunning training. Spinning around a pole is just as inefficient as a sideflip.

I think we both have the same goal, to spread a positive and accurate idea of parkour, I just want to make sure the message that you portray with your video as we as Blane's video or any other is clear to new traceurs and freerunners.

Offline bigninjapimp

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2007, 03:48:52 PM »
Nicely done Tk, I loved the ending.
Frosti I always been one to argue that all human movment through the enviroment is parkour, if done safely and with the right mindset.

Offline Acewall

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2007, 04:12:41 PM »
I loved the video. I've also thought about making an artistic type parkour video, but I don't feel I'm at a high enough level yet. Your video was amazing. I can't even think of anything to say excpet that you are an inspiration.
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Offline crazymex

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2007, 04:21:03 PM »
very nice man. I loved the flow, flow was amazing. Very fast, speedy syle. Then to top it all off, the camera and editing work is beautifull. 2 years of work for 5 min, thats cool.
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Offline Matt Hudson

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2007, 04:30:46 PM »
Well done TK, I simply loved it.
There was talked earlier of putting "good" parkour videos on YouTube to help spread positive vibes about parkour. I think you've done just that.

I am in no position to give critique when you are clearly better than me. But I will say this, good flow, could be better.
And flow is not too important to learn from what I've learned on here, it is gained.
But all in all I loved it. I will later download the unedited version, but not right this second as my computer is a little slow.

This video truly is. "Art in Motion"

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2007, 04:36:28 PM »
Very artistic and i hope that when i decide to make a video it will hopefully be as artistic as this video (which will take me years more of hard training).
You did a great job and as paddy said it represents parkour very well. Bravo.

Offline TK17

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2007, 08:21:25 AM »
Thanks everyone for the comments so far!

Lauriejennifer: I really appreciate your comments on the "spirit" of the video ... that was exactly the sort of thing I was going for, and the things you said I DIDN'T do, were things I was specifically avoiding, so I feel very validated.  :):)

JBF28:  If you have a minute to tell me which vaults could use work specifically, like where they were in the video, I'd appreciate it, but otherwise I'll just continue improving every aspect as much as I can.  Glad you liked it.

Cblock: Cheers.  ;)

Demon:  Thanks so much for taking the time to give a detailed response.  The climbups at 2:32 and 2:35 were, ironically, some of the last filmed for the video, but they were done on a day when I'd had little sleep, little exercise in the previous week, and a lot of training already that morning.  As for them being unbalanced, I only just recently broke the both-hands-at-once barrier, but I've also made a point of alternating when I drill, so if I do left hand first once, I'll do right hand first the next time, to stay even.  It's also really interesting that you pointed out the air position in just those two jumps, specifically, because those were the two where I was the most frightened/tense/unsure of my ability.  It's a good commentary on how pushing your limits a little too quickly can lead to bad technique, which in turn can lead to unpleasant results.  The takeoff at 3:29, you make a very good point, and I actually felt the things you were talking about.  Two clarifications, though ... first, I had to not roll into the street :P and second, the drop isn't actually as far as it looks, thanks to the fisheye lens.  It's big, certainly ... 8 feet is nothing to sneer at.  But not as huge as it might seem.  As for 3:40, 4:43, and 4:49, I agree with all three, and had already thought of them, and I'm glad to hear you supporting that little voice in the back of my mind ;).

Your comments on the spirit and nature of the video were deeply appreciated, as those were exactly the things I was going for.  The locations are mainly UNC Chapel Hill, which is honestly more obstacular than Lisses/Evry, and the courthouse plaza in Greensboro, NC.  Both are within an hour's drive of my house, in opposite directions, and the places that I rushed to every morning I woke up to find a dry, cloudy day (we don't get many here in NC).  The multiple shots were actually something of a lucky coincidence.  At first, I was hoping my friends would help me film, would be around to hold the camera, but as I was waiting for cloudy days, they were constantly busy or had other commitments they couldn't get out of, so I started using the tripod.  Realizing that was boring, having the camera completely still in every shot, I decided to do something to mix it up a little, and as a result it opened up my mind and my training in a very beneficial way.  I also sort of enjoy the philosophical implications of a static world where I'm the only thing moving.

You mentioned virtuosity in some movements but not others.  I'm curious as to which were which (besides the muscleups :P) because I kind of thought most things were at the same level:  high-intermediate.  So if there were some that stood out as extraordinarily clean, I'd be interested to know which and why.  Last, the POV camera ... ha ha ha, funny story.  I actually bought a helmet camera before going to Lisses this summer, a nice tiny little lipstick-tube sized thing with a fisheye lens and TV-quality resolution.  It broke.  Don't know how.  So to get that shot, I actually had to take duct tape and bungee cords and strap an ordinary camcorder to my head.  It was really difficult because I couldn't exactly breathe very well, I had to attach it so tightly around my jaw ... was an interesting kind of training, made me think about swimming long distances underwater or training in Colorado ... places with not much air.  ;)

Frosti:  You caught me on one, I have an explanation on the other.  The underbar at 3:20 is the only extraneous movement that really, truly, isn't justified at all.  I tried to slip it in under the radar, but you're right, it does very little. :-[  However, the tac at 3:13 was envisioned as a fakeout in a situation where I am being chased ... your average pursuer would not be fast enough to come around the wall and would likely be thrown off by that particular skill, because he would have to either run up the ramp, turn all the way around, or come awkwardly over the intervening wall.  I agree that there's a kind of hypocrisy in terms of things like Blane's videos ... people are so blown away by his power, skill, control, and attitude that they don't "criticize" the inefficiencies.  However, I did my best to remove them from my own video, while at the same time EMPHASIZING the fact that some inefficient-seeming moves are actually true parkour.  The underbar at 3:20 was the sole example of something that's great for training, but not truly parkour in and of itself.

BNP, Acewall, Crazymex:  Thanks so much for your kind comments, I'm really glad you found the vid worth watching.

PaddyOHayes:  That's quite a compliment you gave me there, mate.  I also appreciate the fact that you're not afraid to say that flow could be better, because of course you're right!  A lot of people don't say that when they think a vid is good because they think it'll offend the vidmaker.  But I couldn't agree with you more ... always moving forward.

Moa: That kind of "I will try to do a similar thing" is the greatest compliment I can think of ... I train to become the kind of traceur I see in my heroes, and I make videos to try to accomplish the same things as the videos I love, and that's how I learn best.  So that tells me that I'm truly on the right track, here.  Thanks for watching.

Keep the comments coming, if you don't mind.   :-X

;)

Thanks, everyone,
-TK17

Offline AN D

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2007, 01:34:09 PM »
That was just beautiful man, really just beautiful
I seriously was close to crying because I could really just feel such a huge amount of love and passion you have for this discipline. You move with so much quickness, strength, and confidence that its just refreshing and fun to watch.
Your hard work shows and is very inspirational.
As for criticism, I deeply wish I could be of more help but I really am not skillful/talented enough to give in-depth advice

besides all the stuff everyone else mentioned this is all that I could get

2:32 your top out seemed sloppy and had much less control then all your other movements
3:03 your legs seem to be a little to loose on the reverse vault instead of being nice and tight and close to your body  (the other reverse vaults were superb though!)

obviously I had to pull out my magnifying glass to get at these but I'm just trying to help  ;)


fantastic job man
VERY well done
as cheesy and kiss ass as it sounds, your truly and inspiration  :)

-Andy

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #13 on: November 27, 2007, 02:57:42 PM »
overall that was an awesome video man, much appreciated.

That was a gnarly fall in the unedited version, looked it at least, did you just lose control? not sure what you meant with that.

Some of your landings sound kind of hard, but you are a bigger guy so not sure how much that'd affect it, that one after the small tac vault seemed a little strong, your feet were close together and it was pretty high impact I think, just some little nitpicky stuff, but yeah, nice job man, I have to say your rolls impressed me, they seemed pretty spot on in form and timing. and thats coming from 5 years of rolling lol. Keep it up, train safe.
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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #14 on: November 27, 2007, 04:48:52 PM »
like it's been said...amazing flow/work ethic.

i have one piece of constructive criticism.  your actually running technique seems a little inefficient.  you have your head leaning slightly back, and your back pointed straight up or slightly back.  you should have a slight forward lean (note: not a bent back, but leaned forward).  also, you're heel striking, which is not as bueno as running on your balls.  also, it seemed like your knees didn't come up very high, which hurts your extension.  that could be due to your jeans, though. 

as a xc runner i'm a little picky about that stuff...

inspiring vid, man.

Offline Andy Animus Tran

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #15 on: November 27, 2007, 05:08:48 PM »
I posted this on another forum, but I think it's important for people here to see, too, particularly about the landings.

Quote
TK17, first of all, congratulations on your video.  It is well-editted and well-performed.  You have much technical skill and power, and even control.

My biggest concern is your landings.  Nearly every one of them seems to be a little sloppy.  It seems like you are not very comfortable with the technique, because you land hard and you struggle to work with it.  You say that you prepare for drops by bringing mats, and this is not an approach that I would recommend insofar as I don't think it actually teaches you anything about taking drops.  Rather, the progressive method of training small and insignificant drops to perfection before moving upward and onward seems best.  Not only does this allow for technical growth and muscle-memory, but it allows you to get accustomed to your body.  Training with mats will simply skip that whole step.  I am a bit overweight myself, and understandably: losing weight will result in better performance overall...  But it is people like us who must come to understand our own bodies against the grain of what is "conventional."  Just as much skinnier people must adapt to their own bodies in these movements, so too must heavier people understand how to work with their weight, how to work with their body, and come out all the stronger for it.  I would implore you to work on your landing technique and learn your own body, because you are throwing yourself around in far greater distances than I think you have learned to cope with.  Again, though, I applaud your sheer technical ability, power and control through your vaults.

I would also like to argue some of the more controversial movements of your video, involving some spins that did not seem necessary at all.  I understand redirection of momentum.  I can recall the Mathieu LeDoux sampler where, at the end, he performs a 270 cat-to-cat beautifully where the redirection into the 270 turn helped him (a simple 90-degree cat-to-cat, which is almost always better off, would have actually resulted in a complete waste of energy).  I do not believe, however, that certain points of your video are examples of this "appropriate use of inertiac redirection," so to speak.  For instance, you tac off of a wall to cat a parallel wall, then cat-to-cat back to the original wall.  While you were running to tac, I fail to see why a wall-run would not have sufficed.  I would love to see your response and argument for certain moments like these, as I am sure you have them.

Lastly, I think the only reason I have a gripe with the above is because of the introduction.  I think that without it, this video would have been taken strictly as-is, and the only concern that I would have had was with your landing technique, so I would like to put that into consideration.
Andy Tran, C.S.C.S.
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Urban Evolution
Parkour Virginia

Offline Max G

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #16 on: November 27, 2007, 05:13:17 PM »
i already commented on .net, but again great job.

Offline skye3001

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #17 on: November 27, 2007, 05:16:40 PM »
I am TRUELY inspired.  That was just amazing.  The freedom, the unity, the flow....


Two years of training: Where do I sign up?   ;)

Offline TK17

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #18 on: November 27, 2007, 06:34:31 PM »
Hmm.  Okay, first off, the "criticism" was taken as constructive, thoroughly so, so I'm not arguing or feeling defensive or upset.  I'm just going to "think out loud" as I respond.

I have to disagree - conditionally - on the landings criticism.  However, I'm completely open to a more in-depth explanation of what you find wrong with them, so if you can provide me with some clear explanations and tips I'm more than ready to hear them and take them into account.  I doubt you would have made the comment unless you had something concrete and specific in mind, so please, by all means, share!  I am well aware of one or two rough landings in the video, but no more than that.

1.  I definitely DO NOT prepare for drops by bringing mats.  Forgive me if I wasn't clear on that post ... I prepared for a SINGLE jump, one that was not a drop but a level gap, by bringing mats, and the mats were not actually placed on the landing point at all, but before it, in case I fell short due to a lack of commitment.

2.  In the entire history of my parkour training, I have taken drops of greater than thirteen feet zero times, greater than ten feet only four times, greater than eight feet fewer than 20 times, and greater than six feet less than one session every two or three months.  I practice small drops of less than three feet, both "dropping" and leaping forward, both slapping and rolling, every week, in large quantities, being careful to "think inside my joints," constantly reviewing my own technique and adjusting to the environment.  I also practice more "medium" drops of 4-6 feet several times a month, again being careful to pay close attention to my technique, and to how my body feels before, during, and after a session.  I work both on grass/mulch and concrete, with shoes on and off.  I feel very accustomed to, and comfortable within, my own body.  I have been working on the shock-absorbing roll for nearly nine years and have never had a criticism leveled at it, and I have been studying and practicing drop technique seriously for nearly three years now.  I've also trained, variously, for "silence," "slow absorption," "90-degree rule," and "collapsing," depending on the theory-of-the-moment that caught my eye and seemed to make sense - in other words, I haven't blindly stuck with one technique, but have been doing research and adjusting myself.

Again, this is not meant to be defensive, but informative: I think you might have added together things that you've seen with false assumptions about me and my training.  That doesn't AT ALL invalidate whatever it is you saw, so I'm definitely eager for clarification on that.  Personally, if I were to list the landings that I REMEMBER feeling bad, they would be the gap jump with the two freeze frames, and the recovery from the wallclimb-through-the-tight-space.  If I were to widen the "bad" definition to things that were wobbly or otherwise iffy, I would also include the drop into the "stone box" near the beginning of the video.  And that would be it.

As noted above to Frosti:
Quote
The underbar at 3:20 is the only extraneous movement that really, truly, isn't justified at all.  I tried to slip it in under the radar, but you're right, it does very little.   However, the tac at 3:13 was envisioned as a fakeout in a situation where I am being chased ... your average pursuer would not be fast enough to come around the wall and would likely be thrown off by that particular skill, because he would have to either run up the ramp, turn all the way around, or come awkwardly over the intervening wall.  I agree that there's a kind of hypocrisy in terms of things like Blane's videos ... people are so blown away by his power, skill, control, and attitude that they don't "criticize" the inefficiencies.  However, I did my best to remove them from my own video, while at the same time EMPHASIZING the fact that some inefficient-seeming moves are actually true parkour.  The underbar at 3:20 was the sole example of something that's great for training, but not truly parkour in and of itself.

My main point with the disclaimer was not actually to "justify" certain iffy moves, but to encourage a double-take in the ongoing efficiency debate.  I, personally, believe that efficiency depends on three things: safety, simplicity, and speed.  But since each of these three things is independent of the others, multiple techniques can be "equally" efficient, does that make sense?  You can sacrifice a little safety for speed, or you can be a little more complex and maybe a little slower if it makes things safer overall.  Certainly, you could argue that I chose poor examples for my argument, but some of the major points I wanted to highlight include:

Rail slide down the stairs (2:19): faster and POTENTIALLY more controlled than running and skipping two or three steps at a time, safer than turning and dropping, and leads smoothly into a shock-absorbing roll.

360 dismount from a landing (2:22): It's difficult to see because of the fisheye, but the combination of vertical drop and horizontal momentum on that landing, combined with the slant of the wall, means that you have a choice between "rolling" with the landing, as I did, or quite literally tripling the strain on your knees, ankles, and wrists to try to rebound directly without turning, because actually you wouldn't be "rebounding" at all ... you'd be absorbing, killing all of your momentum, and then shoving off again sideways before falling towards the ground with unpredictable momentum.

180 cat/cat to cat (2:30): Again, it's difficult to see from that angle, but the way the wall is structured, if you were to come straight in through the door and try to passe muraille directly, you wouldn't be able to do it because of the structure of the stones, and angling into the corner puts your wrists near some rusted metal sticking out of the wall. So it wasn't efficient in and of itself, but more of a reaction to the imperfect environment. Had those walls been smoother, I would've gone straight over.

Reverse vault over rail (3:03): Sheer trial and error.  To be honest, I RESISTED the reverse technique here for almost an hour before I gave in.  Due to the speed and direction of the shoulder roll, the natural exit point has foot placement and torso momentum such that it requires extra energy and time to straighten out and go for any other kind of vault.  Lazy vaults result in clipping, monkeys require stutter step, etc. etc.  I actually took a stopwatch, there's nothing else I could think of.  However, just to prove the point, by NOT rolling, other options become open, which is why I "doubled" the clip.

Monkey to underbar (3:10):  Aesthetics and "clean" technique would dictate that I take the underbar smoothly, with no foot tap.  But trial and error showed that it didn't slow me down at all, and at the same time gave me much more control.

Tac to lazy (3:13): See above.

Underbar (3:20): See above (mea culpa).

Speed-Reverse (3:31): This was a longtime "project" of mine, to explore other alternatives to the diving kong or double kong, and this was one of the smoothest and fastest I came up with, especially in situations where the "roof" is cramped enough to prevent simple jump-up-and-run-over.

Turn to underbar (4:00): Similar to the tac lazy, envisioned as a fakeout/retaliatory direction change.  When training, I review parkour in several ways, according to the different descriptions I've heard over the years: sometimes I think A to B and B to A, sometimes I think in terms of reach and escape, sometimes I think about chasing, and sometimes I think about being chased.  They're all different mindsets, and they lend themselves to different categories of techniques.

Runby (5:20):  This was one of my favorites, no one's commented on it yet.  I deliberately placed a "perfect" obstacle in the center of the screen, and did ABSOLUTELY NOTHING with it, because quite frankly, nobody EVER would, except to drill a technique: it's in the middle of a giant field of concrete and requires no special movement.

All of these things are deliberate ... as stated in the intro, it's an artistic piece ... not strictly for entertainment.  There is meaning behind it, and this kind of debate is actually what I was HOPING to spark with it.  So don't take my explanations as the "end" of the argument, Animus ... I've laid these opinions on the line specifically so that people WILL challenge them, and we can talk them out.  These were my thoughts, and at this point, I want to know how you'll respond.

:)  Thanks for taking the time to actually think it through.  That's a big compliment in and of itself.
-TK17

Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Go - A parkour sampler by TK17
« Reply #19 on: November 27, 2007, 06:45:42 PM »
Okay... haven't watched the actual parkour stuff yet; but I love the text at the beginning. SO important. :D More comments to come after I actually watch the parkour part. :)
She followed slowly, taking a long time,
as though there were some obstacle in the way;
and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
--excerpt from Going Blind, Rainer Maria Rilke

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