Author Topic: landing a drop/jump  (Read 3893 times)

Offline argetlam

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landing a drop/jump
« on: November 15, 2007, 04:37:41 PM »
Landing has been a subject that interested me after i hurt my knee very badly after a stupid accident, and I would like to outline the basics of landing, and what you should or should not do. Please comment and critique...

After I watched a video on a website I have totally forgot the name of right now, I saw that my landings were completely wrong. AS the tutorials on all of our sites say, you should land with your knees about shoulder length apart, and hands in between to take some of the impact. But the problem was in the pictures and videos is that everybody bends there knees past 90 degrees, witch I have found recently to be very damaging to the joints, and other various parts of the knee, and can lead to tendonitis. Very painful.

After watching this video it outlined that you should bend your knees, but never past 90 degrees, 90 degrees is about the point were you should be pushing up into your run, or launching forward into your role. One of the disadvantages other than injury of bending the knee too much is the loss of momentum and forward movement, because of the stopping power of bending the knee. The whole point to parkour is forward movement, is it not? On the other hand a knee bent on a landing that is about 90 degrees, but no lower will carry you forward almost automatically. The only time you mite need to bend past 90, is when you are doing precisions, because of course you do need to stop on certain target when doing that type of jump…
And that concludes my sermon on landings =)

Hope to never see a bad landing in a vid again…

Offline John [sss24] Chadwell

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2007, 05:30:57 PM »
Amen brother I try to get my friends to land correctly but nothing-doing.
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Offline Steve Low

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2007, 01:28:06 PM »
There's nothing wrong with going past 90 degrees as long as you are minimizing sound which engages your posterior chain to lessen the impact on the joints and disperse it to the muscles.
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Offline Muhammad

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2007, 02:03:59 PM »
I tried the "don't go past 90 rule" and it didn't work for me. It actually caused me to have pain in my knees, so I stopped, and now do what feels natural for my body. I personally feel more comfortable going past 90, and I use what Steve has mentioned of trying to always land quietly, with precision, which engages all of my lower body muscles, spreading the impact away from my joints. I used to have knee pain before I started training for parkour, but that has gone away. What you must realize is that there is no perfect formula for success that will work predictably with the exact same results for every single person. We all have differences in our body structures, and the important thing is to learn how to listen to your body, and to care for it and maintain it. You have to allow yourself to become finely in tune with your whole system, and know how to work it in the way that is beneficial. Each individual should discover what works best for him, because no one else can do it for you. In the end, it's you who will have to live with the results, whether it be that you strengthened yourself, or you destroyed yourself, so I suggest you pay close attention to what hurts, and learn how to do things in a way that does not cause pain or damage. Don't place so much focus on what other people say, but put the focus on what your body is saying to you. If that means going past 90 for you hurts, then don't go past 90, and the reverse can also be true for another person.

Offline Charles Moreland

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2007, 02:15:12 PM »
Each individual should discover what works best for him, because no one else can do it for you.

It's kind of hard to see this there in that wall of text. But this is how you should approach every aspect of your training. Every human body reacts in a different way so ultimately it is your responsibility to listen to what it is telling you. No one else can experience exactly what you experience when you take a landing.

Offline Andy Keller

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2007, 02:16:23 PM »
For example......way past 90:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7MfiCKNb020
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Offline Muhammad

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2007, 06:50:49 PM »
LOL


Offline Josh Maciel

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2007, 07:04:03 PM »
That seemed like it must have hurt his knees...just another example that David Belle isn't perfect...but still...he is god haha
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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2007, 07:14:52 PM »
I do my landings either rolls, or quad. I land with my feet a little ahead of by hands and absorb with my arms and legs, no problems yet, and it makes my landings soft like a pillow. To top it all off it looks really cool ;D So obviously i break the 90 degree rule, which i think i read demon did some reaserch on that showed the rule is false MYTH BUSTED (i think)

Offline Muhammad

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2007, 07:18:40 PM »
David Belle stated in his recent interview in New York that he has never had any knee problems at all, and in this video, his landing looked pretty darn good to me! I don't think he made any mistake at all. I think he executed it with skill and precision.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2007, 07:21:25 PM by Muhammad »

Offline Andy Animus Tran

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2007, 08:44:36 PM »
The 90-degree rule is a farce and is... essentially one of the stupidest things in the world.  The only time it makes sense is when you are preserving forward momentum.. basically, when going into a roll (because almost any time you have forward momentum, a roll is liekly the best idea).  A landing drop a straight drop, it is PERFECTLY acceptable (and ideal) to go beyond 90 to absorb the impact.
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Offline Zachary Cohn

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2007, 09:59:49 PM »
I think one of the most important things, something I recently realized I wasn't doing, is RESIST as you bend your knees. Going past 90 is bad, very bad, when your legs are just compressing. If you aren't resisting the landing, it can damage your knees, because it's just like falling even farther.

Offline Andy Animus Tran

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2007, 10:43:03 PM »
I think one of the most important things, something I recently realized I wasn't doing, is RESIST as you bend your knees. Going past 90 is bad, very bad, when your legs are just compressing. If you aren't resisting the landing, it can damage your knees, because it's just like falling even farther.

Compression IS resistance.  My little motto for teaching landings is, "Compress, don't collapse."
Andy Tran, C.S.C.S.
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Offline Muhammad

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #13 on: November 28, 2007, 02:18:45 AM »
that is correct. collapsing into landing without resistance would hurt. i can't imagine why anyone would do that!

Offline JumpOff

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #14 on: November 28, 2007, 07:12:30 AM »
Steve Low and Muhammad have got it right.

You can go past 90 degrees...it's just like doing squats.  What the problem is, is that most people bend and lean into their knees, making all of the force go to the knees(bad bad bad)... but of you go into like a power squat after landing, you'll feel the force go into your hamstrings and quads...
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Offline Ozzi

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #15 on: November 28, 2007, 02:13:18 PM »
I am glad I finally red this thread, I used to bend my knees all the way then I red the whole not going pass 90 degrees and stared trying that. Although in some occasions where it felt like it would be better to actually do it I just did it.

I do have knee pain some times after a long workout, I have to add though, I have done breakdance, snowboarding, gymnastics and martial arts so it might be all of that added up.

The only time I dont go pass 90 degrees in when transitioning into the roll or a small drop but off course that is just to keep my momentum. Usually when it is a straight down drop I flex all the way adding resistance with my leg muscles to absorb the impact. The whole diminishing the sound or quiet drop, I have noticed the less noise or the more quiet you lend the less your body feels it anywhere. This is a good thread to kill the myth of not passing 90 degrees, and let all the noobs know about it is what feel right.

It is my philosophy that theres no better teacher than your own body. It tells you everything you need to know about a technique, all we gotta do is feel and listen to it.
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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #16 on: November 28, 2007, 04:36:49 PM »
The 90-degree rule is a farce and is... essentially one of the stupidest things in the world.  The only time it makes sense is when you are preserving forward momentum.. basically, when going into a roll (because almost any time you have forward momentum, a roll is liekly the best idea).  A landing drop a straight drop, it is PERFECTLY acceptable (and ideal) to go beyond 90 to absorb the impact.

OH thank god when i said that the 90 degree rule was "MYTH BUSTED" i was sure i was gonna be murdered. I thought that i had spoken too hastily because i didnt have any of the evidence i referenced, thank god I was right because I am not in the mood to be wrong today  ;D , and secondly i have broken that rule alot so my knees would be screaming (but their fine).

It is my philosophy that theres no better teacher than your own body. It tells you everything you need to know about a technique, all we gotta do is feel and listen to it.

That should be practised cautionsly because if the 90 degree rule was true you wouldn't know about the damage you were causing instantly and you would continue because you wouldn't feel the imediate pain like you would if you landed stiff legged (I can only image that) but over time the pain would progress so you shouldn't declare yourself safe if after one jump of 90 degrees you feel fine(if it was true) because you probabaly wouldn't immediatly feel the consiquences.

Offline Muhammad

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #17 on: November 28, 2007, 05:25:48 PM »
I was doing repeated drops this evening from a height of about six feet, and paid close attention to how it felt when I was landing. It was most comfortable when I landed on the balls of my feet, resisting all the way down, going past 90 and letting my hands touch the ground in between my knees to absorb some of the impact. I noticed that much of the stress was going into my shin muscles because of my technique of landing quietly on the balls of the feet. This way also allows me to spring right back up immediately after landing in order to launch myself up and forward into a dead run right away. I have been using that same method for the past five months, and have experienced no problems with my knees at all. I have found that extensive training in precision jumps has improved my landing technique considerably, and I feel much more comfortable lately jumping from these moderate heights.

Offline Ozzi

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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #18 on: November 28, 2007, 05:28:51 PM »
You are right Moa but thats what I am mentioning LISTEN and FEEL. You can always tell if something feels right or not, specially when landing. You can probably execute the technique right (on the ball of your feet and all that) but for some reason it didnt feel as smooth, as it should. I agree with you, but I am talking on a more personal relationship with your body. When you know your body well, and you have a close relationship with it (god this sounds so gay) you feel what is going on, right on wrong pretty much all the time.

So even if you are doing it pass 90 or not, feel what your body is doing, where are you feeling more of the force/impact/pressure. How did your body feel after the session. Catch my drift?
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Re: landing a drop/jump
« Reply #19 on: November 28, 2007, 05:49:01 PM »
I have got a question, muhammad said that origionally he was feeling the force in his shin until he corrected his form, does anyone know where you should feel it most, i feel it mostly in my thigh