Author Topic: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?  (Read 4168 times)

Offline Phytolith

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Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« on: October 01, 2007, 03:48:40 PM »
I'm looking for something to take after a heavy workout, other than ibuprofen, to help my muscles recover.  I'm taking fish oil, but am looking for something I can take on those really rough days.  I want to avoid anything that would bulk me up, though.  Any suggestions? What do you guys take?

Offline Steve Low

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2007, 03:54:22 PM »
How good is your diet, workout routine and sleep schedule? Those are MAJOR factors you should have everything down to the T first before you think about supplements (besides fish oil that is).

To answer your question though.. something with simple sugars and protein is good right after a workout. And then about 30-60 mins after get a good meal.
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Offline Phytolith

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2007, 05:09:36 PM »
I have a regular schedule (sleep 7-9 hrs, work out 1 hr a day, 3 days a week) and consistent, decent diet (veggies, fruits, meat, not big on snacks). I normally take Ibuprofen right after working out, just on the safe side, but pretty frequently that's not enough to prevent big knots, really sore muscles, the like. 

Offline Steve Low

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2007, 06:39:22 PM »
BTW, you shouldn't take anti-inflammatories after working out because it blunts natural immune response for repair of muscles. While it's going to take away pain, it's going to cause repair of muscles and thus soreness of the muscles to stay around longer.

What's your workout plan look like?

If you really have to take something then I think Jesse/Will can come in and say something about that. I'm not into them too much myself though otherwise I would inform you more than what I don't know.
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Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2007, 08:05:23 PM »
When you say, "recover" do you mean actual recovery as in muscle repair/building, or are you referring to getting rid of soreness?

If it's the former, Steve and Jesse/Will are your best authorities on that. As far as reducing or eliminating soreness, I strongly recommend a combination of stretching and hydration. Both will help your muscles eliminate waste that can cause soreness.

You seem like someone who has the discipline to maintain a regular and healthy schedule; why not tack on a full-body stretching routine after your workout? Static/passive stretching will be really good for you after a workout. Dynamic stretching will be good during a workout/as part of your workout.

Also, be sure to drink plenty of water during and after your workout, or a low-sugar/sugar-free sports drink that replaces electrolytes.

Also check your potassium intake. Bananas eaten before a workout can help with muscle spasms in particular. Be sure to stay hydrated though. I think you have to eat a ton of potassium for it to pose a dehydration problem, but better safe than sorry.

Hope that helps.
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Offline Ken PKChiro

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2007, 08:45:59 PM »
btw, more people die from NSAID use than AIDS in the USA, think about it
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Offline Kaliastrih

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2007, 03:37:14 PM »
I was reading this website abcbodybuilding.com for a while. They have an article on The Window of Opportunity about what to consume post-workout here's a couple of links:

http://www.abcbodybuilding.com/windowofopportunity.php
http://www.abcbodybuilding.com/laywindownon.php

I was thinking of doing this for a while, but i could never find Dextrose or Maltodextrin anywhere.  Hope it helps.

Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2007, 04:29:38 PM »
I didn't read the article but dextrose and maltodextrin are processed sugars. Gross, IMO. They are in practically everything. Just read ingredient labels.

I don't know enough about nutrition to say whether dextrose/maltodextrin are helpful post-workout, but I am one to avoid processed foods as much as I can, so this sounds sketchy to me.
She followed slowly, taking a long time,
as though there were some obstacle in the way;
and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
--excerpt from Going Blind, Rainer Maria Rilke

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Offline naroz

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2007, 11:25:27 PM »
I have a regular schedule (sleep 7-9 hrs, work out 1 hr a day, 3 days a week) and consistent, decent diet (veggies, fruits, meat, not big on snacks). I normally take Ibuprofen right after working out, just on the safe side, but pretty frequently that's not enough to prevent big knots, really sore muscles, the like. 

What does your stretching routine look like?
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Offline Phytolith

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2007, 09:12:41 AM »
Thanks for the tips and websites: I've stopped taking the ibuprofen immediately after working out, and generally get a banana and some roasted edamame instead.

I generally stretch for about 10 minutes after each workout.  I should do more, but often have to run to catch a train.  I do the stretches that they recommend at Primal Fitness, plus a few from yoga and my fencing training that focus on areas I get particularly tight: I-T band, hamstrings, shoulders.  I think that going straight from working out to a 40min train ride might be part of the problem, though. 

Muse, the stretching routine you posted is good, but pretty time consuming.  Any recommendations for stretches that work a bunch of areas at once? 

Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2007, 04:41:17 PM »
Most yoga poses stretch a lot of body parts at once. If you are short on time, just do one stretch from each area, or focus on just one body part that has been worked a lot (e.g. legs only). Alternatively, when you catch the train, stand instead of sit. It will keep your muscles lengthened and you can actually use the momentum of the moving train to create a dynamic stretch. Experiment with how you hold on to the bars/straps, how you stand, etc. to work with the momentum of the train as it moves and stops, to stretch different body parts.

Also, the Samson stretch is a good overall body stretch, although I think it's better pre-workout rather than post.

Stay super hydrated and that will mitigate the effects of limited post-workout stretching (but only somewhat). Make sure you hit up a complete body stretch routine as soon as you can!
She followed slowly, taking a long time,
as though there were some obstacle in the way;
and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
--excerpt from Going Blind, Rainer Maria Rilke

www.madisonparkour.com

Offline BobT

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2007, 07:06:32 AM »
Stay away from the edamame (and all soy protein in general) :P.  In spite of the marketing by the Monsanto Corp. and it's affiliates, the human body is not meant to process soy. If you're not vegetarian, eat some lean meat - if you are, eat some raw nuts or plain yogurt.

Some light reading:

http://www.drwong.us/ArchivedSoyPoison.html

Offline Milquetoast

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #12 on: October 17, 2007, 03:33:35 PM »
While soy is almost definitely not the wonder food that some companies would like us to think it is, I highly doubt that it's actually poisonous or extremely harmful.  Here's a Wikipedia article that offers a (perhaps) more balanced look at potential problems with soy:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soy_controversy

Honestly, soy has been such a staple in the Asian diet that I think we would have died off long ago if it really were as bad as Dr. Wong suggests...

Offline BobT

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #13 on: October 18, 2007, 06:58:04 AM »
Honestly, soy has been such a staple in the Asian diet that I think we would have died off long ago if it really were as bad as Dr. Wong suggests...

As far as I know, soy is used more as a condiment than a staple in Asia.  Some vegetarians in the US derive more than half of thier protein intake from soy.  You'd also be hard pressed to find an energy bar (or a can on soup for that matter) that doesn't contain soy to boost it's protein content.  Finally, let's not forget that a long time ago, soy wasn't genetically engineered (about 70% of it is these days).

Offline Phytolith

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #14 on: October 18, 2007, 01:31:53 PM »
Though a bit off the main topic and voyaging into the research on soy: I worked in a cancer research lab where some of the things said by  Dr. Wong were shown to be more or less true.  On the other hand, you can find similar data on almost ANY plant food (GMO or otherwise).  I currently study plants and their role in early human diet, and I'm learning a lot: plants can't run away from their predators, so they develop a bunch of physical and chemical defenses, which, when we humans consume too much of them, can cause problems.  Thing is, though, it all depends on the amount you eat.  Potato skins contain all sorts of toxins but ordering a plate of them every now and then isn't going to kill you.  So if you like soy, or edamame, go for it.  Just don't make it (or any one type of food, including grains!) an overwhelming portion of your diet.  The more varied your diet, the better.

Offline Milquetoast

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2007, 09:28:40 PM »
Actually, soy really is a staple in the Chinese (and probably Japanese / Korean) diet.  While it is used as a condiment (soy sauce, soy paste, etc.), it is also a standard breakfast item (as soy milk -- the "real" kind, not the kind you get here  ;)) as well as being used in a TON of dishes (typically in some form of tofu state).  Buddhist nuns and monks get pretty much all of their protein from either soy or wheat gluten (at least, the non-cheating ones do), and despite much suspicion that ringsel / sarira is actually just gallstones caused by an imbalanced diet, I don't believe these vegetarians are particularly unhealthy.  You may have a point about GM crops, but I really don't know enough about that...

Phytolith, I thought plants actually evolved fruit so animals will spread their seed for them.  Or, were the chemical defenses just for the non-fruit portions?  Btw, this is Eugene here.  Weird handle, I know, but I've just been using it for so long...

Offline Phytolith

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #16 on: October 19, 2007, 09:14:17 AM »
Hey Eugene! 

You're right, fruits have generally evolved for animals to spread them, but they tend to be kind of selective about the kinds of animals they want to eat them.  Take for example peppers: most mammals would take a soft fruit like a pepper and digest it whole, including the seeds.  Birds, on the other hand, eat the flesh but either don't entirely digest the seeds or avoid the seeds and therefore are an effective spreader of the plant.  Luckily for the pepper, mammals have very sensitive senses of taste and smell, birds don't. It's thought that pepper plants that evolved capsaicin (the chemical that creates the hotness of peppers) in order to deter mammals while not deterring birds. 

Another example: a lot of the fruits we generally eat, (apples, peaches, oranges, etc.) have very tasty flesh to encourage mammals to eat them and carry them, but their seeds are often very hard, bitter and frequently contain trace amounts of very strong toxins (not enough to kill, but enough to cause illness when consumed in large amounts).  So the plant gets us to do the legwork for it (spreading its seeds) while working very hard to protect the seeds themselves.

Finally, as you suggested, a lot of the veggies we eat aren't actually the reproductive organs of that plant, but the leaves, stems, buds, seeds and underground storage organs of those plants.  By taking this part we're effectively killing the plant, and so plants try very hard to defend themselves.  Of course, domestication throws this defense system off, for a few reasons (including us selecting the less-poisonous varieties, and plants themselves benefiting at a species-level from being domesticated - they get spread every where, protected from pests and diseases, etc.), but until you get into GMOs you can't remove several million years of evolutionary defense.

Ok, I'll stop ranting about plants now, especially since we've gotten so off topic.  Thanks everyone for your suggestions about workout stuff.

Offline Steve Low

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Re: Post-Workout Recovery/Supplements?
« Reply #17 on: October 19, 2007, 06:06:26 PM »
Quote
plants themselves benefiting at a species-level from being domesticated - they get spread every where, protected from pests and diseases, etc.), but until you get into GMOs you can't remove several million years of evolutionary defense.

Decreasing the genetic variety is why certain plant diseases are becoming more prevalent. So it's not all a good thing that we're domesticating 'only the good ones'. This applies for animals as well.
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