Author Topic: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process  (Read 25659 times)

Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #20 on: September 16, 2007, 05:49:11 PM »
There can be as many types of certification out there as there are people willing to develop a program and get it moving so that it has "street cred." So you can have everything from what M2 is working up, to a safety certification (mentioned above), to no certification at all.

As an example:

In ballet (sorry to go back to this all the time but it's what I know best) there are about 5 main certification schools of thought: RAD, Cecchetti, Vaganova, Balanchine, and the French school. These are pretty global. After that you have individual professional schools that have their own curriculum, and most of these are training grounds for major companies: School of American Ballet (ABT's school), Pacific Northwest Ballet School (PNB's school), SFB, etc. Beyond this you also have a lot of smaller certifications/professional organizations: BBO, DMA, etc; as well as simply local studios that are not affiliated with any sort of professional body or certification program, but have developed their own curriculum with knowledge and good sense (I was trained at such a school).

The RAD system is probably the most codified. It has very defined sets of exercises for each level, and what each student is and isn't allowed to do at each level, and a separate system for becoming a RAD instructor; even down to a dress code for what students at each level can wear. Cecchetti is also very codified, with set work, etc.

Vaganova and Balanchine have no specific curriculum or standards. They are passed on generationally, by word of mouth, as the older dancers teach the younger dancers. Most ballet teachers in the US come from either the Balanchine school or the Vaganova school. They don't have any kind of ballet teaching certification (although some may have a dance degree from a college; but this is not the same as a teaching certification). These teachers get hired by reputation alone; either they know the technique or they don't, and it's pretty obvious when you observe a teacher whether they have the right training or not.

The good part about this is that it keeps the art form organic and creative.

The bad part about this is that anyone can open up a dance school in the US without any sort of certification, and no one would be the wiser.

I have no certification to teach ballet. I have studied it my whole life and performed at a professional level. My "street cred" in the ballet world comes only from the fact that one of the most accomplished dancer/choreographers in the country (my AD) asked me to join his school's faculty when he opened our company school. However we also have teachers on our faculty who have full RAD certification (that's the big structured one I talked about earlier). Our students get good training either way, whether from me or the RAD teacher. My AD does not see any difference in credibility between the RAD teachers and me, even though I have no certification.

However down the road there are a few ballet studios that are run by people who took a few ballet classes in their time and decided to open a business. I have taught in such schools as well; but not for long. In those studios, there is no understanding of safety or good technique. The instructors don't understand dance history or a dancer's physical development. It makes me angry, because not only is it putting young people at risk of hurting themselves, but it is also giving them an incomplete education--IMO history and philosophy are critical elements to learning the art form. So in consideration of this I am in favor of the development of standards.

However as mentioned in my first sentence, the creation of standards does not mean that there can only be oneset of standards; nor does it mean that parkour outside of those standards will cease to exist. There is room in parkour for all sorts of things, just as there is room in ballet for RAD, Cecchetti, or Joe Schmoe's Academie of Danse (sad as that may be). I myself was not trained at a professional school; just at a local small-business type school. However I had the good fortune to be at a studio where the instructors had high standards and good technique and training. None of them had certifications, but all of them knew what they were talking about and as such I was able to make a professional career out of it as a result of that training.

America's professional ballet schools--the ones with street cred, that turn out outstanding dancers--are filled with all sorts of teachers, from RAD-certified, to simply retired professionals; to dancers who never performed professionally but got college dance degrees. And the students benefit from all of these. In any given ballet company, the roster of professionals will show students who went through the full, uber-structured RAD gamut, to students who simply had the good fortune to be trained at good local (uncertified) studios growing up. All are capable of performing at an outstanding level and all have excellent technique and artistic creativity (yes, even the ones who went through a structured program--they wouldn't be getting pro contracts if they didn't).

The point is, whether or not you think certification programs are a good idea will have nothing to do with whether or not they exist. All it will do is inform your decisions as to how and where you get your training. Certification programs will arise (and I personally hope that many do) as the discipline grows. It is up to you whether or not you choose to follow one, and honestly your parkour may or may not be better or worse than the next person's for it. It depends on a lot of factors. But some sort of standardization is necessary if our discipline is to have any sort of credibility in the public eye; say, if someone wants to start a parkour club at their school. Just because standardization is out there doesn't mean we all have to follow it lockstep. Rather, it is simply another tool available to us to help us overcome obstacles.

"There are many paths to the top of the mountain." --Hindu proverb

Furthermore, a set of standards/curriculum for a movement discipline is *vastly* different from a set of standards/curriculum in public education. In public education (for better or worse), you are put on a conveyor belt of sorts and you move through the levels (grades) year to year. In a physical discipline, you still progress at your own pace. Some students may stay at level one for two years, some may be there for six months. Anyone who has been in a martial art with a belt system knows this. You train at your level until you are ready to test, whether that's in three years or three days. Ballet is the same way (in fact RAD dancers have to undergo rigorous performance examinations at every level). At SMB, most of our dancers stay at the same level for two years; but there is plenty of wiggle room because every dancer is different and progresses differently.

The reason for a curriculum is simply to give teacher and learner a framework within which to understand a student's progress; and also to ensure that the teacher is providing instruction that is developmentally appropriate for their students. This is a safety thing. At SMB girls are not allowed to go en pointe until they are at Level 3 (by our curriculum). Even then, there are certain fitness and technical benchmarks a girl must attain before she is invited to join pointe class. This is for safety, pure and simple. I have been at many less-reputable schools where girls were allowed to go on pointe pretty much when they wanted to, and I saw lots of ruined feet (and ruined potential careers) as a result.

With parkour, if a student isn't ready for a certain movement, because they lack the strength or the discipline or even the right attitude, they are not ready, plain and simple. It is not a judgment on the student being "good" or "bad," it is an indication to the learner and to the teacher of where that student is in terms of their skills. It tells the teacher and the student what he/she needs to work on to be ready for the next movement, for the student's safety and solidity of training. All students will be ready at different times in different movements: Student A might be ready for a kong before Student B; but Student B might have complete mastery over precisions while Student A struggles with them.

A good (as in well-designed) certification program/curriculum will account for this and it will benefit both students.

IMO, it's silly to reject the idea of a certification program based on any of the following criteria:

1. It will make students feel bad because they will have to be at "Level 1" while others may be at "Level 3."

This is the reality of any learning situation: we are all at different places. Making students feel okay about that reality is the job of the teacher cultivating an encouraging environment that values hard work and individual effort. It does NOT come from denying the fact that there are differences in skill level.

2. It will stunt creativity.

If anything, a curriculum enhances teacher and learner creativity because there are clear paths to follow, which shows the student what the "rules" are and also where to break them in the interest of skill development and creativity. There is not a performing artist anywhere who got to a high level without first studying theory in a structured way. You learn technique so you know where to bend it in the service of your artistry. Otherwise you are just bumbling around in the dark.

3. It will "ruin" parkour.

I'm not sure how. Again, there is room in parkour for certifications of all stripes, and no certifications at all. Countless other physical disciplines have shown this. It is up to each individual traceur to choose the training model that works for him: a very structured certification system, a free-for-all individualized journey, and everything in between. Just because M2 creates a model doesn't mean we are all bound to follow it. The ballet world is packed to the gills with highly skilled dancers, all of whom had very, very different training along very different curricular models. Don't like a certification program? Opt to train without one. Don't like the one that's there? Create your own!

I guess that's all I have to say on the subject for now. Not sure how much of it is coherent. :P

For the record, this is a GREAT discussion and it's important that we have these kinds of roll-up-your-sleeves-and-hash-it-out talks, to help our discipline grow up big and strong. Keep the ideas coming! From many perspectives we will all eventually survey and map this uncharted territory we inhabit. And then hopefully we'll push the boundaries some more. :)

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and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
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Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #21 on: September 16, 2007, 05:56:55 PM »
Nooo! Edit time limit! *shakes fist*

I wanted to add a 4th option that people might put forth to reject the idea of a certification program, along with my rebuttal:

4. But what about if a student is... (x)?

No system is perfect. A good system will account for learner differences and will have enough wiggle room to account also for teacher judgment. That is why we have human teachers and not computers teaching parkour. Exceptions (or potential exceptions) should never be a reason not to do something. Rather, they should be motivations for developing a system with a robust and flexible design.
She followed slowly, taking a long time,
as though there were some obstacle in the way;
and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
--excerpt from Going Blind, Rainer Maria Rilke

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Offline Michael Zernow

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #22 on: September 16, 2007, 07:10:32 PM »
To me this is comprable to a film degree. While it really means nothing to say another filmmaker as to how good you are as a director or cinematographer, it does show someone like a school that's looking for someone to teach a film class that you know the basics that they want taught or an organaization that you're fit to start a club. This kind of thing would be a way to separate ourselves from the image of a bunch of kids trying to cause trouble by rebelling and jumping off stuff to a group of disciplined and dedicated people who are passionate about what we do and we would have a way to empirically prove that we are capable to teach a class at a gym or start a club.

Offline Jus7in

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #23 on: September 16, 2007, 07:16:30 PM »
I think it would add a more professional feel if we named each level. (EX. the colors of Martial art belts)
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Offline Jus7in

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #24 on: September 16, 2007, 07:22:40 PM »
This is going to be hard to assign a person his level. We might have to meet a person face to face and in a Parkour environment to  test them. Which that presents a problem for out of town people. This looks like we are going to need some major organization here.
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Offline Skipper

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #25 on: September 16, 2007, 07:55:51 PM »
Im not sure if this is being understood correctly. It sounds like nobody is being "assigned" or "awarded" a level of skill. its just a simplified format for improvement and teaching that the trainers would use. in that, it would be for the trainer's eyes only, not an open award ceremony when you decide to teach them the next step.

This is a great idea when you view it from the eye of a trainer. Dont think of it as a "Everyone in this country has their f#cking thumb up their butt" kind of system... think of it as a "be happy that someone is caring about supercharging your progression as a traceur or freerunner" kind of system.

Offline Cody Beltramo

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #26 on: September 16, 2007, 10:20:50 PM »
Another possible benefit to having certification just crossed my mind.  This would be very useful for any professional circumstances.  Especially anyone interested in doing stunts or something professionally, or even if they just wanted to do a Parkour demonstration somewhere.  If while applying, the Traceur said that they were a certified level 4 Traceur or something like that, it would sound a lot more professional as well as a lot more credible from a professional perspective.

Offline FreeStyleFox

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #27 on: September 17, 2007, 05:32:54 AM »
What about us who train alone and train others?
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Offline Nik "Nik" Horvat

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #28 on: September 17, 2007, 06:04:43 AM »
I think this is a really good idea.  It could definately increase the credibility and safety of Parkour if there is a regimented safety certification.  Having instructors learn the science behind why and how things in the body get bad can have great outcomes. 

The only problem I see with the initial scale is it seems to be based more on someone skill than their ability to teach. ex.  100 precision jumps, vaults, top-outs, whatever.  Just because someone is skillful doesn't mean they can instruct, and just because someone isn't as physically capable doesn't mean they don't understand the biology and physics behind the movement and aren't able to pass that on.  Remember the old addage, "Those who can't do, teach."
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Offline Matthew Lee Willis

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #29 on: September 17, 2007, 06:13:00 AM »
Crossfit
Crossfit has done many things for the parkour community and I have personally welcomed into into my life for a good supplement for parkour training.  I feel as though you are even using this system as your own system with the parkour certifications.  Imitation is wrong.  Emulation is great.

I hate the word PKFR
I just flat out don’t like the use of these PKFR.  Maybe PK/FR.  Do you plan on having two certifications? I would say 90% of the Free Running videos that I have seen online consist of a flip.  In this cert are you classifying your self as an instructor of Parkour, or free running...or both?  People see free running and want to do flips.   I think it would only be Logical that if are an authority on this then, you would be able to teach all aspects of this. 

Competitions national committee.
I wrote something about parkour competitions about 2 years ago.  I didn’t know much behind what I thought then was a sport and flips were parkour.  I obviously have grown from then and so has many others within their faith and devotion to parkour.  I had motioned something about a national committee.  I suggested that nothing to do with competitions would even be able to happen unless you had a ruling body telling everyone exactly what parkour was and wasn’t.  Now, I was smart enough I think to understand this then.  Now I know what my adolescent parkour mind was thinking at the time.  M2 you suggest a governing body who would give a certification to people who tells YOU what you what you know to be as parkour.  Now, there is everything wrong with that and not at the same time.  We obviously as a community understand what parkour is today.  Parkour is different everyone, so you would be limiting and constricting views.  I personally believe a general line of information CAN explain exactly what parkour is and is not.  Although, limiting is also a toss up of an uproar.  Just thing what the UK people would think.  Just to clarity I think “parkour” competitions are the devil.  Free Running…more power to you.  Though, what I stated above as about just a parkour association in general.  I feel that you are trying to create a governing body that watches the whole (world/us) and clarifies truths.

Who makes you the leader of the Cert?
Mark, your amazing and your doing a bang up job with teaching and leading people in the Country.  There are many that have a followed you and gone far.  There are many that have followed Internet videos and gone far.  To proceed I would love to hear why you (and I guess possibly your crew) would have the Audacity to pull off such a huge step in parkour.  I understand that there are parkour coaches out there assigned by David belle…supposedly.   That was brought on from a man who created the movement, not necessarily the philosophy but the movement.  I believe in you Mark, but I think this is greater then you.  Although, someone has to rise to the challenge…just like Jesus.  No, I’m not calling you Jesus hehe.

Acroyoga.  Who is the authority on that?  Who has done it for years and years and studied in temples and so on to get that cert.  No one.  Although there are authorities out there that certify people…for a pretty penny.   I teach parkour on a daily basis.  Does that make me an authority?  Should I create my own certification myself?  The bottom line with this is that.
1.  Its up to those that acknowledge it as a legitimate certification that will benefit from it.  You can start a basket team but unless you follow the NBA rules…your not going to play any professional teams.
2.  You might be a money grubbing backstabber of parkour selling out ideas of certification to create revenue for yourself.

Why 100 Precisions
This throws me.  I would like to work with you in this infant state of figure out why which movements are important to the certifications process.  In the old days elite gymnasts had to meet requirements.  They still do to this day.  They have to hold a 1 min handstand on the floor without taking a step with the hand.  They must be able to do a standing jump to a certain height and be able to pass a physical assessment test.

There is so much more that I can try to add to this making it good:
For teaching in public schools and for gymnastics facilties and even bringing people to the philosophy.

Then there are the bad things that go along with it:
The idea of limiting, confiding in a group to tell us what parkour is and is not.

I have pages of more things to say.  Although, this should be sufficient for now.  Mark.  I would like to talk to you about this...through email, message boards and a phone call.  Thanks.

For your gym...it work because its organization.  Although, do you want to organize the view of the world on parkour? (This last questions is this is suppose to stimulate and guide you into your next post Mark. hehe)
Parkour:Phone Calls
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Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #30 on: September 17, 2007, 07:06:15 AM »
Quote
Who makes you the leader of the Cert?
Nobody.

I'll make a certification guideline, if it's useful, people will use and adhere to it. If it sucks, they won't.

By way of example, I was asked this question about why I could make a Parkour website for the country about 2 years ago. Today APK is the largest (by registration) and fastest growing (registration and traffic) Parkour website in the world. Now, in my eyes, that should only be true because APK has useful information and is a usable site for people, certainly I didn't walk up to 19,300 people and tell them to register for the site, I (Along with the help of a lot of other people) just tried to make a site that is useful and has good information.

So, the same for the cert process. You talk about David Belle's people coaching ... how do I get the info? How does anyone? If we can't, then it has limited usefulness. If everyone, like you, and me, and Muse, and Jesse, and people I don't even know or don't know yet, add their opinions to the cert thread and process, that will help it to be more universally useful, and the more useful it is, the more "official" it becomes.

Along the lines of official, APK doesn't and hasn't ever said "Official" anything, yet we're growing 4X faster than the "official" sites .. what does that mean?


As for the "why 100 precisions" ... I think you missed the part where I said "FOR EXAMPLE" and "This is to start a discussion" ... but also, WHY NOT?  :)
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Offline Andy Animus Tran

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #31 on: September 17, 2007, 07:11:34 AM »
If anything like this is ever going to happen, I believe that it should happen and discussed throughout the world, not just confined to America.  I'm with Matthew Lee Lewis, for possibly the first time, here.. This is beyond you, Mark, and that's no jab at your ability.  It's just that if this is something you think should occur, it should be discussed with the Parkour community.  The whole of it.
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Offline Skipper

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #32 on: September 17, 2007, 07:32:40 AM »
Animus do you think the whole of the parkour world would accept any of M2's ideas, even IF they pose reasonable intentions? If you do, great, but I am almost POSITIVE that there wont be one post supporting mark or anything he proposes on certain foreign message boards. Yes, I would love to see it as a worldwide thing once it has a solid foundation of guidelines, and im not one to predict the future, but I really, really dont think it would go over too well elsewhere... judging on past events of course.

With that said, why does it have to be carried out world wide? could it not just start here in the states, and it then spreads overseas? As a recently conceived idea, its going to be hard to gain support... such as many other new ideas. What if we get it going here where people wont shun it instantly, and then people see how successful it can be, and then adopt the completed program... rather than the idea of one. I think this is only a tool that can be used at universities and clubs with official qualification requirements, but I dont think there will be much need of it within a circle of friends or community. You would use it for things like teaching specific movements to people just to help them move along quickly through the techniques so they can start practicing on their own and learning about the "real" parkour out on their own.... not things like teaching the full understanding and philosophy behind the origins of parkour and ultimately becoming a parkour master that is able to properly translate the lost message passed down from our lord, david belle.
Just my thoughts, I dont think its as 'strict' as people are making it out to potentially be.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2007, 08:04:11 AM by Skipper »

Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #33 on: September 17, 2007, 10:01:23 AM »
Animus, the rest of the world is watching. APK get visits from over 120 countries a month, and as I mentioned, has more registered users from all over the world than either UF or .net, I have not in any way limited this site to people of the US or Americas.

If other people are interested, they will help, they will add input, or they will make their own which is better than the one that I help to make.

I am not going to tell anyone else what to do or not to do, I am only going to say what I am going to do.

As for it being bigger than me, I have invited everyone's input.

 Parkour Coaching is obviously stepping up and gearing up to do something, and I applaud them for it, and I will support whatever they do if it is good. UF, for all the shit they take, has taught Parkour to more people than anyone else. Again, does it make it the best? They are actively doing seminars, teaching at schools, etc and they deserve credit for that. Nobody else (that /I can see) is doing anything with an effect or reach that has any significance.

If people (the world, as you put it) are so concerned, they can and will make their own certification and standards process, but I have a prediction:

Instead, most people will bitch and say "Parkour doesn't need this and standards are against Parkour" which is fine, but doesn't really help anyone does it?

All the intentions in the world don't add up to the single smallest of actions. Intentions don't help people, actions help people.
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Offline Muhammad

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #34 on: September 17, 2007, 10:09:12 AM »
Just because standardization is out there doesn't mean we all have to follow it lockstep. Rather, it is simply another tool available to us to help us overcome obstacles.

That says it all right there.

Offline Zachary Cohn

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #35 on: September 17, 2007, 10:52:34 AM »
I think introducing a "belt" system is pretty arbitrary, and wouldn't add that much. If someone is good, it is obvious they are good. (Note- the colored belt system is actually an Americanized way to keep kids interested. Originally, the only belts were white, and over time the belt would dirty and 'turn' black. Kids in America, however, wanted proof of their progression and regular rewards. Hence, the colored belts.)

So I'm definitely against having a 'belt ranking system' of student all the way to master instructor, but the possibility of one, maybe two levels, of instructor certification is not a horrible idea. While, like Mark said, they'd have to be accepted by the community to have any worth, but if a college wanted some proof of certification, you could show them this. Level 1 might be a clear understanding of a variety of techniques, and a good grasp on safety factors. Level 2 might be a mastery of a variety of techniques, with a clear understanding of safety from both a technique perspective and WHY (an anatominal perspective). I think knowledge of the techniques is obviously important, but the certifications should focus more on a general knowledge of safety, nutrition, and anatomy.

Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #36 on: September 17, 2007, 11:23:05 AM »
Quote
If someone is good, it is obvious they are good.
To Whom?

If I were looking for a French Cuisine teacher, I wouldn't have the slightest clue to tell if they were worth a shit.

By the same token, a certification only offers protection from this if it's adhered to.

There are plenty of people out there who have bought a black belt and teach martial arts as if they are a master even though they haven't earned the title and aren't necessarily good teachers. - so, it is advisable that someone does their homework before choosing an instructor in ANYTHING.

If there is an accreditation system, you have to make sure that IT has value and is adhered to strictly in order to get any value in knowing that someone certified by that system knows what they are doing.

CrossFit who has been certifying people for a few years now has just changed the way they will certify level 2 and level 3 instructors (they only have 3 levels, "CrossFit understanding" "Crossfit Teaching" and "CrossFit Teacher Teaching") ...

So, another thing to consider is that this will be a start, nobody is so disillusioned as to think it will be perfect from the start, or ever perfect. But it will be a work in progress and hopefully will achieve a status of having value.

BTW, I agree with your assessment of belts, there are pros and cons to any form of ranking system, and no form of ranking system guarantees competence, but it can certianly help, especially if the advisory board is strict and broad enough to have value.
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Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #37 on: September 17, 2007, 11:49:45 AM »
Why certification systems suck.

Yes, I feel like people think that I have one-sided views, because I present the side (obviously) that I am in favor of.

That doesn't by a long shot mean that I don't know or see, or believe that there are two sides to everything.

So, I see a lot of difficulties with certification systems.

I'll use martial arts as it's an easy comparison -

Having a belt in Martial arts doesn't mean you're tough, a good fighter, or necessarily even able to defend yourself - depending on the belt, the style, and who gave you the belt.

Some of the best fighters and martial artists in the world have no belt

Some people with high ranking belts are not good teachers, or aren't good at what they do, etc.

People learn at different rates and different ways - it is up to a good teacher to transfer information in the way that a student can grasp and make use of  the information - so a curriculum is a guideline, not a set-in-stone path tat must be followed for every student

There are plenty of other flaws in specific systems, and while it is good to have an understanding of them so that they can be avoided, I don't think I need to state every single one just to show that I see both pros and cons.

It is also good for people to bring these up, because it will help us design a system that hopefully minimizes the cons and maximizes the pros - note that you will never eliminate the former nor perfect the latter ;)


 
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Offline Andy Keller

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #38 on: September 17, 2007, 12:00:16 PM »
I agree with Happydud. Safety certs would be the best approach. I don't agree with the 'belt system' at all.

Mark, you said that some people buy their blackbelts. What will stop them from doing this with Parkour? There is no easy way to stop this, either. With belts, teaching will have to be spread out VERY far to accommodate all of the traceurs that will want belts. How will we ensure that all of these teachers are thorough and correct in their teaching? This exact situation has happened with Martial Arts. Most of us have probably heard of an instructor of martial arts that, more or less, has taken 'bribes,' or the like, to speed someone through training to get to the top level. Why can't this happen to parkour?

That is why I stand for safety/teaching certs only, not ranking. I think some parts of the parkour community of today will perish in a transition from self-taught, to organized and strict schooling(No offense to Primal Fitness).

Discussion Question: What effect will belts/ranks have on the individual's pursuit of parkour? If that individual would like to teach themselves, that is. Will they be demoted/belittled/put-down because of lack of official training? Hmm...



PS: Mark, I hope you don't take any offense to this. I'm sure you won't, because you are a mature and respectful guy. Anyway, I see your points. Thanks for your participation in this discussion.
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Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: Parkour / Freerunning Certification Process
« Reply #39 on: September 17, 2007, 12:48:05 PM »
If anyone does put someone down because of a lack of official training, it shows more about the person who puts them down.

This is where "you don't have to be certified to be good" comes in, but also, who is it that you're worried about putting down who? This is so hypothetical, it seems to me to be worrying about something that may or may not ever happen, and if it does, is the uncertified person going to run home crying?

There's nothing that says a self taught person can't be good or even the best (who taught David?) ... but that doesn't make a certification bad either, they are sort of apples and oranges. Like "do you walk to school or carry your lunch?" ... not mutually exclusive. Some people can learn in a "school" and some on their own. Who will be better? The person who practices more!
Be Useful.
If I don't try to make the world a better place, who will?
Every person has a choice - live by your fears or live by your dreams