Author Topic: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?  (Read 4674 times)

Nooblet177

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U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« on: June 18, 2011, 03:03:52 PM »
 Ive been seeing many comments on Youtube videos of foreign traceurs bashing American training methods and skills. Whats up with that?  [WTF]

Offline Micah.

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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2011, 04:33:53 PM »
Russian traceurs are ridiculously better than most U.S traceurs, in my opinion.

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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2011, 05:45:23 PM »
They live don't in America, so they don't see how our methods are best fit for us.

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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2011, 05:45:27 PM »
My personal gathered thoughts from being on this website forever. Let me just emphasize before you read this that I know this isn't everyone. Personally I'm against everything on this list and I'm sure there are some other people that are as well. But like I said, this is just what I've picked up as a personal opinion.

1. American Traceurs, ESPECIALLY some of the ones on here seem to place a high emphasis on ground level training with minimalist shoes. It seems to me that there are for more European and Asian traceurs pushing the boundaries of what is possible as compared to American ones.

2. American traceurs seem to want to categorize movements and make parkour a sort of "working system" if you can understand what I mean by that. European traceurs especially seem to be more about just going out, throwing crazy stuff and having fun. American's tend to want to make it systematic and that in turn, makes it fairly boring.

3. American traceurs tend to be regressive against the idea of competition and want parkour to stay grassroots and also try and separate parkour from freerunning and tricking. European traceurs tend to want to make freerunning, tricking and parkour the same thing and make it all one discipline. (NO ONE EVEN THINK ABOUT STARTING A PK/FR DEFINITION DEBATE).

Just my thoughts.

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Offline ALo9

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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2011, 05:47:14 PM »
Really? I watch A LOT of pk vids online and have never seen anybody dissing us Americans... All I ever see is that everybody wishes they were Russian  :P

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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2011, 06:18:17 PM »
Kyle pretty much hit the nail on the head here...it's a different culture, and we have different ideas of how things should be. I personally haven't really seen any distinct "bashing" on Americans, but there's is definitely a difference in training methods.

Offline Jacob Carter

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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2011, 06:58:58 PM »
My personal gathered thoughts from being on this website forever. Let me just emphasize before you read this that I know this isn't everyone. Personally I'm against everything on this list and I'm sure there are some other people that are as well. But like I said, this is just what I've picked up as a personal opinion.

1. American Traceurs, ESPECIALLY some of the ones on here seem to place a high emphasis on ground level training with minimalist shoes. It seems to me that there are for more European and Asian traceurs pushing the boundaries of what is possible as compared to American ones.

2. American traceurs seem to want to categorize movements and make parkour a sort of "working system" if you can understand what I mean by that. European traceurs especially seem to be more about just going out, throwing crazy stuff and having fun. American's tend to want to make it systematic and that in turn, makes it fairly boring.

3. American traceurs tend to be regressive against the idea of competition and want parkour to stay grassroots and also try and separate parkour from freerunning and tricking. European traceurs tend to want to make freerunning, tricking and parkour the same thing and make it all one discipline. (NO ONE EVEN THINK ABOUT STARTING A PK/FR DEFINITION DEBATE).

Just my thoughts.

Go Europe.


I agree with you 100%. Both styles have their own strengths and weaknesses. I personally enjoy a mix of the two. It seems to me that Americans treat it more as a discipline than an activity. I do the same thing. While it makes training more beneficial, in a way, it also makes it boring like the point you made above. It all just boils down to culture and how you were raised. Obviously those points you made don't apply to everyone in the US or Europe but I think for the most parts that they hold true to each culture.

Also I'm pretty sure Russians are just insane. I think I might start drinking vodka like crazy and then throwing out triple corks.  :-Sarcasm
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Offline hfksla

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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2011, 07:27:16 PM »
I'd be gay for Oleg Vorslav, that is all.
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Offline Shyam Subramanian

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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2011, 07:32:42 AM »
Don't forget conditioning.  While European traceurs just condition through parkour for the most part and rarely dabble with weights, oly lifts, etc., American traceurs (again, for the most part) feel that weights are the best way to increase power and strength in parkour.  Also, the APEX ranking system (I can't find the link right now) for difficulty, conditioning, etc was completely ridiculed and thrown away by the 3run forums.  It was actually very entertaining to read :D

To be honest, and I know people here are going to hate me for it, I kinda like the Europe impulsive training methods better than the structured American ones.  I dunno why.

EDIT: Every time I say something about a specific continent, I'm talking about the general trend I see and traceurs for the most part.  I'm aware that there is a mix of training methods in every country.

Oh, and as much as I hate to admit there are some...um...untalented...Russian traceurs.  Lol.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2011, 08:07:55 AM by Shay »
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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2011, 07:42:52 AM »
Don't forget conditioning.  While European traceurs just condition through parkour for the most part and rarely dabble with weights, oly lifts, etc., American traceurs (again, for the most part) feel that weights are the best way to increase power and strength in parkour.  Also, the APEX ranking system (I can't find the link right now) for difficulty, conditioning, etc was completely ridiculed and thrown away by the 3run forums.  It was actually very entertaining to read :D

To be honest, and I know people here are going to hate me for it, I kinda like the Europe impulsive training methods better than the structured American ones.  I dunno why.

EDIT: Every time I say something about a specific continent, I'm talking about the general trend I see and traceurs for the most part.  I'm aware that there is a mix of training methods in every country.

As much as I hate to admit there are some...um...untalented...Russian traceurs.  Lol.
I'm the same way dude. I like just going out and throwing crap and having fun. I probably wouldn't involve myself in weight lifting if I wasn't a bodybuilder. But my training style is why I mainly leans towards tricking and stuff.
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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #10 on: June 19, 2011, 08:40:46 AM »
Just to touch on what Shay said.

The reason you like the idea of going out and just having fun is because it's healthy, and it feels like the way playing around use to as a kid. To be honest, my training consists of about 60% fun, and 40% structure.

Structure has it's place in training, but fun and letting loose does as well. Nobody, has the definitive answer on where the line stands between structure and fun, and I like that, because it gives you room to find what works best for you.
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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #11 on: June 19, 2011, 08:46:19 AM »
Julie Angel will be coming out with a Ph. D. on the history and origins of parkour later this year (she gave a presentation about it at American Rendezvous 2), and I encourage everyone to look into it. If you understand where parkour came from and what brought about the European methods, you can see why they do what they do.

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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #12 on: June 19, 2011, 08:55:47 AM »
I think that it's much better and healthy to train without weights and by using mostly calisthenics. Mostly because that's mostly what parkour is, you're always pulling your own weight.

And on the topic of structure in training, I believe that to have structure can reinforce your skills but trying new things and just going out and having fun broadens your horizons.

« Last Edit: June 19, 2011, 09:05:21 AM by blahsuprise »

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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #13 on: June 19, 2011, 10:55:02 AM »
1. American Traceurs, ESPECIALLY some of the ones on here seem to place a high emphasis on ground level training with minimalist shoes. It seems to me that there are for more European and Asian traceurs pushing the boundaries of what is possible as compared to American ones.

2. American traceurs seem to want to categorize movements and make parkour a sort of "working system" if you can understand what I mean by that. European traceurs especially seem to be more about just going out, throwing crazy stuff and having fun. American's tend to want to make it systematic and that in turn, makes it fairly boring.
This (European) approach you describe might work for people who are naturally genetically endowed (be they either individuals or a population/ethnicity as a whole), but they are few and far between. But for the rest of the mortal population, a structured, progressive training routine that starts from the bottom, and gradually builds up from the base always helps people in getting better while staying safe at the same time. You may elect to go out and have fun, and for a while things may appear all rosy and enjoyable, but all it takes is one fall to bring your whole world crashing down. The chances of that one fall happening increase when your base is not strong. And most impulsive training methods do not help much in making the base strong. I'm not saying a fall will not happen to someone who has trained on a structured, progressive routine for many years (example David Belle's famous fall), but the odds of that happening are greatly reduced because of the sheer amount of disciplined training that person has been through.
And when it comes to outright injuries or accidents, or even long term implicit injuries in the form of joint damage, I'd rather opt for reducing my odds as far as possible, even if it means I have to adopt boring processes.

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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2011, 10:59:52 AM »
Structure has it's place in training, but fun and letting loose does as well. Nobody, has the definitive answer on where the line stands between structure and fun, and I like that, because it gives you room to find what works best for you.
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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #15 on: June 19, 2011, 11:57:42 AM »
Because there's some sort of bizarre Internet feud between the US and Europe that's developed in the last decade or so, which spills over... well, pretty much everything.
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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #16 on: June 19, 2011, 12:35:02 PM »
They called trolls.

Even if the Ilabacas and Armitages, Shieff, Doyle, etc. did spend time writing comments on Youtube, do you think it would consist of attacking others? Take your advice from people that matter. (Though I guess to take that advice, you'd have to decide that I matter? Lol.) The internet phenomenon has made people think they are more important and impactful (not a word) than they are. Find yourself a mentor or someone you respect and do your thing.


But yea... if Chuck Norris was Russian, it'd be the end of the world as we know it.
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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #17 on: June 19, 2011, 04:58:07 PM »
1. American Traceurs, ESPECIALLY some of the ones on here seem to place a high emphasis on ground level training with minimalist shoes. It seems to me that there are for more European and Asian traceurs pushing the boundaries of what is possible as compared to American ones.

Completely agree with this. I think we give this advice so much to newcomers, that we keep ourselves from progressing to an extent. It's one thing to tell someone who is just starting, to train at ground level, or anything that's potentially dangerous in general, but it's completely different (in my opinion) for someone who has multiple years under their belt. Not saying that everyone has to do dangerous things, or practice things at a height (it's completely dependent on what you want at the end of the day), but many of us have confidence levels way below what we're physically capable of. I think learning to not be afraid would be the game changer for a lot of us, and the most direct way to do that is challenging and conquering your fears (including but not limited to situations involving heights).

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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2011, 07:14:07 PM »
I honestly think that there's so much more ground level training in America just because of how things are built around here, its much more spread out, and harder to get away with being up high. I've started doing some training at heights lately and its really not easy to find places up high to train.
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Re: U.S Vs. Rest of the world?
« Reply #19 on: June 19, 2011, 07:23:39 PM »
I honestly think that there's so much more ground level training in America just because of how things are built around here, its much more spread out, and harder to get away with being up high. I've started doing some training at heights lately and its really not easy to find places up high to train.
That is a very true statement. I usually only get on roofs and stuff that I've been on multiple times before and that tends to be in a cluster of buildings. If it's like a Walmart in the middle of nowhere then it's pretty dumb. But if I can get in an area where there's a cluster then it is golden. I dig my rooftop training and tricking, but not enough to get arrested for it.
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