Author Topic: Parkour Vs. Freerunning: Once and For All Article  (Read 29374 times)

Offline DaveS

  • Hirundo Rustica
  • *****
  • Posts: 652
  • Karma: +12/-6
    • View Profile
Re: Parkour Vs. Freerunning: Once and For All Article
« Reply #220 on: October 22, 2010, 03:31:08 AM »
See, I'm pretty certain that the majority will eventually agree on a definition. Already I've seen three major groups come up with essentially the same definition worded only slightly differently. Even if I hadn't, it's part of the nature of Parkour to assume that all obstacles can be passed and the whole discipline is based on us doing things that we haven't done before. Many people disagree now, but that's how everyting starts and there's nothing to suggest that it will always be that way. Understanding improves with time, always.

I hope that also means that explanations can get shorter in time ;)
~ Dave
NorthernParkour and the British Parkour Coaching Association

Offline Jordan Strybos

  • Man of Skochy
  • Global Moderator
  • Hirundo Rustica
  • *****
  • Posts: 1337
  • Karma: +1337/-0
  • Lancaster, PA
    • View Profile
    • PKGA
Re: Parkour Vs. Freerunning: Once and For All Article
« Reply #221 on: October 22, 2010, 05:38:49 AM »
Dave,
I agree that the majority will agree, what I was trying to say is that there will always be people that disagree, just as there is in essentially everything. As you said, understanding improves with time. What I was getting at is that there will always be people new to parkour who are investigating it for themselves, and they will probably at first have different ideas, but with time, they'll most likely come back to the general concensus that we have reached here.

Offline Scrag

  • Oryctolagus Cuniculus
  • *
  • Posts: 17
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Parkour Vs. Freerunning: Once and For All Article
« Reply #222 on: October 22, 2010, 06:35:28 AM »
I just have a hard time thinking of parkour and free running as the same thing... "Parkour is the physical discipline of training to overcome any obstacle within one's path by adapting one's movements to the environment." That is APK's definition which i think is good, but a bit general. Even with a somewhat broad definition, "...training to overcome any obstacle within one's path by adapting one's movements..." to me at least, does not involve a corkscrew backflip. That will NEVER help you overcome an obstacle ever. So to go out and train to learn acrobatic flipping and other inefficient movements is NOT consistent to the definition stated above. Therefore, those movements cannot be considered parkour movements. I am not demeaning tricking, after training in parkour for 5 years i needed to expand and learn some new things which definitely fall into the tricking category, but what should i consider those movements? By our definition they are NOT considered parkour.

Offline Adam McC

  • Delicious
  • Hirundo Rustica
  • *****
  • Posts: 2381
  • Karma: +208/-43
  • Level 1 Sexability Certified
    • View Profile
    • Lehigh Valley Parkour
Re: Parkour Vs. Freerunning: Once and For All Article
« Reply #223 on: October 22, 2010, 09:27:04 AM »
I just have a hard time thinking of parkour and free running as the same thing... "Parkour is the physical discipline of training to overcome any obstacle within one's path by adapting one's movements to the environment." That is APK's definition which i think is good, but a bit general. Even with a somewhat broad definition, "...training to overcome any obstacle within one's path by adapting one's movements..." to me at least, does not involve a corkscrew backflip. That will NEVER help you overcome an obstacle ever. So to go out and train to learn acrobatic flipping and other inefficient movements is NOT consistent to the definition stated above. Therefore, those movements cannot be considered parkour movements. I am not demeaning tricking, after training in parkour for 5 years i needed to expand and learn some new things which definitely fall into the tricking category, but what should i consider those movements? By our definition they are NOT considered parkour.

Have you read any of the rest of this topic? All those thoughts have been very specifically addressed by many experienced practitioners. :)

•Lehigh Valley Parkour Community Founder
•Level 1 A.D.A.P.T. Certified
•Urban Current Member

Offline Jordan Strybos

  • Man of Skochy
  • Global Moderator
  • Hirundo Rustica
  • *****
  • Posts: 1337
  • Karma: +1337/-0
  • Lancaster, PA
    • View Profile
    • PKGA
Re: Parkour Vs. Freerunning: Once and For All Article
« Reply #224 on: October 22, 2010, 11:23:26 AM »
"...training to overcome any obstacle within one's path by adapting one's movements..." to me at least, does not involve a corkscrew backflip.

To play devil's advocate, why not? The definition does not mention anything about efficiency, nor does it offer any restrictions as to what movement is included, it simply states 'by adapting one's movements.' An example of how I would enjoy adapting my movement to overcome a 4 ft. wall could include any sorts of flipping.

But as Adam said, these thoughts have been brought up before...and it's way to easy to talk in circles.

Offline Dan Chalifoux

  • Oryctolagus Cuniculus
  • *
  • Posts: 30
  • Karma: +2/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Parkour Vs. Freerunning: Once and For All Article
« Reply #225 on: November 02, 2011, 12:16:22 PM »
I actually spoke with David Belle once on the subject of why he started this sport.
He said that mainly he had been interested in tricking since he was just a little boy and went to try to find a teacher. At the age of 15, he had basically perfected his tricking style, but felt as though something was missing. A few years later, he met Sebastian Foucan, a prodigious in-line skater at the time, and they immediately bonded. They both were interested in the other's abilities, and decided to teach eachother what they knew. Through this unlikely combination of tricking and rollerblading, parkour was born.
"Be strong to be useful."

- Ingemar Stenmark

Offline Conrad Moser

  • Mangabey
  • ****
  • Posts: 380
  • Karma: +20/-8
    • View Profile
Re: Parkour Vs. Freerunning: Once and For All Article
« Reply #226 on: November 02, 2011, 03:29:31 PM »
This thread was a year old, not a week old. Did you really need to resurrect it?
Age is just another obstacle. Get over it.

Offline CoolOutsider

  • Oryctolagus Cuniculus
  • *
  • Posts: 18
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Parkour Vs. Freerunning: Once and For All Article
« Reply #227 on: November 07, 2011, 11:46:14 AM »
i always keep it simple:

Pakour = going from A to B in most efficient way possible

Freerunning = Parkour+creativity

i personally prefer and practice Parkour in it's simplest form, that's just the way i like it.....and i do respect other forms and especially free running and i do enjoy it and i praise who do it :-)...nice article btw.
Practice doesn't make perfect....perfect practice makes perfect.