Author Topic: balanced caution  (Read 4199 times)

Offline Rickety

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balanced caution
« on: September 21, 2006, 04:46:10 PM »
So, I'm out of shape and trying to get into parkour. And I've suffered a number of minor injuries already, before I can even do a decent vault. As is pointed out elsewhere, avoiding injuries now will not only make me happier in the short-term, but keep me functional in the long-term.

I'm trying to figure out how to balance training for parkour with staying uninjured. I'm learning about my capabilities (they're even less than I had thought right now), and trying to expand those capabilities. But, for instance, I seem to have done a number on my back--could be stress as well as parkour practice. This makes it completely impractical to train techniques or practice runs, and is limiting even my general fitness exercises.

But I don't want to just give it up. And I don't want to spend lots of time with sports medicine doctors.

Oi.

So, I'm trying to figure out the happy medium in all this. I'm willing to suffer some pain, and based on what I've seen/read of the community, some injuries come with the territory. I can deal with that risk. But I don't want to hobble when I'm 50 because I'm active now. (As additional demotivation, my father, who has been happily sedentary his entire adult life, still pretty much looks at 60 like he did at 30, which is admittedly slow, but still...)
 
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Offline dwellens

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Re: balanced caution
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2006, 05:17:35 AM »
Welcome to the community.

Not knowing many particulars regarding your situation (age, height/weight, previous activity levels, past injuries, etc.), it's hard to get too specific with recommendations other than take things gradually.  (I just discovered your other posting regarding past activities).  I'd highly recommend purchasing the APK Tutorial DVD for one thing.  I would also pay close attention to warming up and stretching before attempting specific moves and think GRADUALISM.  By that I mean take SMALL progressive steps within each technique.  Sign up for Jesse's WOD (workout of the day), not to be intimidated ('cause I can barely do 25% of what is proposed), but for the variety of workouts presented.

For instance, if you are thinking of practicing drops from even a 3-4' level, start by working out doing multiple standing broadjumps on flat ground to see if your knees are in "agreement" with what you are attempting.  Then find a staircase where you can practice higher drops at a reasonable progression.  Also, be closely monitoring your knees and back after EACH drop to see how everything is doing.  You have to remember, if you are all of a sudden attempting to do something you haven't asked your body to do in 10, 15, 20 years, you have to allow it a SLOW wakeup call or you are going to be asking for trouble.

Also, don't try to compartmentalize PK into a "workout"--incorporate it whenever possible.  When I run errands, I park my truck FAR from my intended destination and RUN, looking for the simplest moves I can perform enroute, be it hopping over a small landscape hedge, running atop a small retaining wall, etc.  Be creative. You don't have to be backflipping off a building (and please don't!)

Baby-step your way to proficiency with warming up and stretching, "listening" to your body, use progressive techniques, and by all means, keep it FUN.

And be careful out there.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2006, 05:20:41 AM by David Wellens »
Be careful & have fun.

Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: balanced caution
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2006, 12:13:43 PM »
Rickety (hee, aren't we all?) ...

Parkour also doesn't have to be your first step .. and some of the things definitely won't.

Even the APK warmup can be a full on exercise, and even the warmup can need to be scaled way down for some people's current state. 30 pullups is a LOT!!

I'd suggest getting into doing the warmup, try to do it, or at least pick 3-4 parts of it, and do it EVERY DAY. Establishing a habit is important in trying to obtain fitness. Then, mix it up, make it fun, set some smaller challenges for yourself, like when you'll do 5 pullups in a row, etc. These goals and challenges can keep it fun, if you simply look at it like a workout ... well, most people just do'nt have the resolution to stick with something because of "should" ... but if you can take "should" and make it fun, then people can stick with it and gain the benefits of fitness without begrudging it.

Then, by bringing up your general fitness, you'll be in order to start adding in some PK movements, drills and practice. David's suggestions are excellent as well.
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Offline Rickety

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Re: balanced caution
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2006, 09:22:57 AM »
Thanks, guys.

David, you definitely hit on one of the points which is a big deal for me. I was diligently exercising, but only had real urges when I could also try playing as well. A big goal for me is to develop habits of movement and "pk vision" so it can be a proper part of my life and not just a workout. That's really lacking for me still, combined with my recent disabilities limiting my options.

I'm going to restart workouts slowly, with light exercises and therapeutic exercises. I think as far as doing pk, I'm going to aim for the spirit rather than the techniques for a while--If I have to scramble over something, then I'll scramble rather than thinking in terms of vaulting.

M2, the APK warmup has been one of the cores of my workouts for a month or more. It's very handy--although I've really had to "cheat" on the pullups, trying reverse pullups instead. And yep, I need to get the fun into it. Unfortunately when I try to do things fun, it seems I try to do them too hard. Blah.

I'll see how it goes. Hopefully I won't add any new injuries this week.
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Offline dwellens

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Re: balanced caution
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2006, 06:17:04 PM »
Hey Rickety,

I saw you had mentioned a bad wrist which made it difficult doing pushups.  I have the exact same problem with my left wrist from a work injury.  I purchased some pushup handles that have helped a great deal @ http://www.karatedepot.com/tr-ex-18.html.  They also carry a great doorjam pullup bar @ http://www.karatedepot.com/tr-ex-15.html.  Both are reasonably priced and well constructed.

One thing I do regularly is shoot hoops at a park that has a pretty decent playground equipment setup.  After being warmed up & stretched from shooting, I "lightly" tackle simple maneuvers, from pullups, "walking"--as in hanging--across the horizontal ladders, small cat-leaps from different objects, etc.  I'll vault over bicycle racks, trash cans, and benches.  While I am still on the courts, when the ball rolls to the fence, I'll sometimes see how fast I can climb the 12' chainlink fence. 

I just try to incorporate simple things to make it fun.  After all, it's just another "activity"--it's NOT a religion!

Pace yourself.  It's no fun being injured, because when you're injured you can't PLAY--a major bummer.

Heal up and have another go at it.
Be careful & have fun.

Offline Muhammad

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Re: balanced caution
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2007, 10:43:13 AM »
I'm thinking that if you take your time and get into excellent physical condition, alot of those problems with wrists, backs, ankles, etc. may actually improve or even go away altogether. I believe parkour could have long-term positive effects on your health, both physical and mental. For example, it has been scientifically established that weight lifting increases bone density, so what about getting your entire body gradually into peak physical condition? Parkour requires all of your muscles and tendons to be built up by regular exercise until they are strong and elastic, and also trains you how to become highly aware of how to redirect your inertia and velocity so that it becomes a tool to make your movements easier, rather than having all of that energy jarred into your joints in a destructive manner. Once mastered, that skill can be applied to virtually any physically demanding activities you encounter.

Another thing to consider is that fact that your body is going to gradually change with training. You need to supply your body with the proper nutritional requirements to satisfy the needs of your newly developing muscular stamina. You will need those nutrients in order for body to repair itself after stress. Make sure the right materials are there to rebuild any weak foundations. Basically, eat enough protein and fresh vegetables, take your vitamins, and drink lots of water to flush toxins out of your body that can lead to fatigue and/or pain.

Offline Gregg HIPK

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Re: balanced caution
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2007, 11:05:12 AM »
Those other posts were from September.

Rickety logged in yesterday. He's still around, tho he hasn't been posting as much.