Author Topic: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins  (Read 14897 times)

Offline Sam Slater

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #80 on: January 31, 2010, 05:51:22 PM »
Some interesting points.  I am not sure that you completely grasped a few things that I was attempting to state though.

"Since safety in parkour is ultimately about self-control and taking responsibility for your own actions, any rules designed for safety are effectively self-defeating in parkour in the long run. You need to think for yourself rather than simply do what you're told." "However, to learn how to stay safe you need to make mistakes, and it's better for those mistakes to be made sooner rather than later."

I disagree with this statement.  As an example, I think it would be better for someone to be told that what they are doing is going to wear down their body and cause injury as opposed to them finding out that this is the case when it is too late.  Why let someone make a mistake that only results in them not being healthy in the end? Some mistakes can be good, but with such a possibly risk intensive activity there are so many crippling or potentially life threatening mistakes that I can't agree that establishing rules for ones safety is self-defeating.  If anything, that is taking responsibility for yourself in a large way because you are taking care of yourself.

"The student isn't the same person as instructor, and what worked for the instructor may not work for the student. The student only finds that out at the end, when they've spent years training in a way that may end up being useless to them."

I understand your point.  I agree that people are different, and some people can not do what others can.  I do feel though that this method is a good teaching model because in the end, we are all humans and you are learning a physical discipline that is based (hopefully) upon finding out what works.  It should teach the individual both a safe and effective method, and help them expand beyond what they feel they are capable of.

An example of what I am trying to express would be telling someone that they had to pass an obstacle by doing a muscle up, but that person has horrible upper body strength.  At their current conditioning and coordination level they can pass the obstacle other ways, or by taking alternate routes, but I am of the belief that a good discipline will make you to be better than you were the day before.  So the person keeps working on trying muscle ups and eventually is able to pass the obstacle that way.  Because they were told they had to do something one way, they are now stronger and more capable for it, and have opened up a plethora of other skills and paths to themselves, where if they only did what worked for them then they might have been stuck with a very narrow range of abilities.

"I don't think it does anyone any good to be forced into following someone else's way"

I have to agree with you 100% on this.  The only problem is that you as the individual have the choice not to follow someone else's way.  You choose to be a student (hopefully) and as such it is the student's responsibility to choose a teacher or coach that works for them ... to a degree.  I am always a proponent of learning what doesn't work for you too.


Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #81 on: February 01, 2010, 06:23:16 AM »
Well said Sam. I boil down what you said about the instructor-student relationship in my "Piano Lesson" example.

If the student goes "freeform" on the first day, this is not helpful, it is not useful, and it is not the most direct path to progress.

There will always be "constraints" based on the experience of others, and ignoring these is usually foolhardy. Of course, it sometimes leads to the greatest inspirations in leaps and bounds. If you are the next Jimi Hendrix, then the standard lesson may inhibit you, but even so probably not, you will probably learn "the set way" and still go off and do something different and creative.

I remember a guy in London, before the term Freerunning existed (imagine that!) - He wore really tall high top sneakers (unlaced), and he did spins and grabs off everything. He had a crazy style that was all his own, yet he knew the vaults, precisions, etc. He was so fun to jam with! Dim Monk comes to mind as well. He didn't seem to follow what everyone said you "had to do" - and he is amazing. So of course there will be examples, but we must keep in mind that there is one Jimi Hendrix and that the people who do better "outside the known set of safest / fastest progression" will be by far the exception.


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Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #82 on: February 01, 2010, 06:30:20 AM »
I should add to that that I agree that with more teaching will come more constraints - you can't teach guitar as if your student is Jimi just like you can't teach martial arts as if your student is Bruce Lee. You have to tech students for who they are!
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Offline jp2ykz

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #83 on: February 01, 2010, 09:55:44 AM »
I agree to an extent but for the sake of complete accuracy. Bruce lee was trained fully in one of the true/unpolluted forms of wing chun (there are allot of sloppy weird versions out there). I actually have a friend trained in Thailand by a master and he explained the style to me. It is based on gates having a reaction and preemptive action for each move your opponent has. It is one of the most well thought martial arts that I have ever been exposed to.

Regardless, Bruce lee was in fact trained in a specific method. It is this method that he learned from and grew beyond.

I don't know about Jimmy Hendrix but I do agree with the general concept. Some people can self teach them selves better than they could learn from someone else (for certain things), especially this day in age because one can look up how to properly do anything on the internet for them self.   
Konging low stuff is stupid. Just jump over it. Or just do a cool flip over it.

Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #84 on: February 01, 2010, 12:43:12 PM »
jp2 - you're a UMD Gymkata guy? very cool!!
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Offline jp2ykz

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #85 on: February 01, 2010, 02:23:16 PM »
UMD?

Afraid I'm not up on the acronyms.  :-\

I saw Gymkata movie from like 1985 awhile back so I had a T-shirt made at one of those corner shops. lol

Pretty sweet huh???

At least I think so.  ;D   

It's a totally rad movie I made a post on it in here under In The Media:

http://www.americanparkour.com/smf/index.php/topic,22716.0.html
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Offline DaveS

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #86 on: February 01, 2010, 06:57:17 PM »
JP, feel free to read one of my posts sometime. I appreciate you feel you understand everything already, but it would be easier to have a discussion with you if you responded to my points rather than the points you've imagined. You still need to work on that 'respecting others' thing ;)

I've clearly stated that I'm not arguing against rules. I'm arguing against pointless and impractical rules, of which there are many.

I'm also not arguing against instructors passing knowledge on to students. I'm saying that it is more useful to pass on only the parts that are useful to the student. Since every student is different, and since you are the only person that can understand your own goals properly, that means it is the student that needs to determine what is taught.

The 'unofficial rules' about responsible actions and staying off rooftops follow directly from the parkour philosophy. Being able to get past obstacles means we don't need to accept the idea that our desires conflict with those of others. We believe that everyone can get what they want, and acting responsibly is almost always the best way to do that.

You do have to make mistakes to learn. Learning means fixing holes in your understanding. If you don't know there's a hole there, you don't know to try and fix it.
Everyone places more importance on their own experiences than those of others. If someone tells you that you have a fault, you don't believe them until you experience it for yourself. People require evidence, and experience is the most reliable source. Words are much less precise than experiences, and we place less importance on them because we understand that, consciously or otherwise.

However fortunately we are also very good at spotting patterns. We don't need to have fallen off a cliff, nor seen someone else do it, to be able to work out that doing so results in likely death. We work it out from the basic principles that impact hurts, and greater impact hurts more.
We can learn these principles from any experiences of impacts and injuries, but it's surely obvious that it's better to learn them with minor injuries than with major ones. We can learn the patterns of the causes of injury with mild and minor injuries that have little or no affect on us, and apply those patterns to help us stay clear of major injuries that would affect us.

To get minor injuries instead of major ones you need to make sure the forces involved are not too great for you to physically handle.
I think the key point is that there are parts of your body that don't increase their resistance to force at the same rate as your muscles increase their ability to generate it (tendons are a common example in the parkour community), and some parts that no amount of physical exercise can strengthen significantly (such as bone strength, skin tear resistance, internal organs).
If you could guarantee that your physical training could increase resistance to all injuries equally then you would be equally safe at all points in your training. But because physical training only improves certain aspects of your injury resistance, in the training environment you are safest when you are the least physically developed.

I've seen the APK parkour definition and while I think it is close to the truth, I'm not sure that calling parkour 'a physical discipline' is all that accurate. Sure, it involves physical actions, but then by that method of categorising reading is a physical discipline because it involves turning pages. Parkour is a human discipline, involving all human capabilities, not just the physical ones.

Edit: Also, although people that are capable of learning on their own have been rare in the past, all people have the potential to think that way. It's just a fault with traditional learning methods that most people are discouraged from forming their own ideas.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2010, 07:02:19 PM by DaveS »
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Offline Andy Keller

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #87 on: February 01, 2010, 08:07:39 PM »
Dave, I like the way you put a lot of that. I personally agree with the majority of your post. Thanks. :)
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Offline NOS - from Parkour Mumbai

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #88 on: February 01, 2010, 08:36:38 PM »
and some parts that no amount of physical exercise can strengthen significantly (such as bone strength, skin tear resistance, internal organs).
I'm glad you agree with this now, because up till a few posts earlier you seemed to be stating the contrary.

I do understand your point of letting a student explore and learn from his own mistakes, it is an important part of the learning process - spoonfeeding everything to a learner will not make him learn anything, if at all, he will only memorise.
I also know that these mistakes should be smaller in magnitude than larger because of the potentially crippling or life threatening nature of this art. For both of the above to match, I accept your point that a weaker, less conditioned individual will be limited to producing smaller mistakes because his musculature isn't strong enough to produce the larger forces that enable him to make larger mistakes. I agree with this - it does have its own place in training.

But you also have to see our point of view that a stronger muscle and a well conditioned body makes one more capable of avoiding injury and 'bouncing back up' from an injury than a weaker body. Also, a stronger and more conditioned body is also more capable of handling itself when the inevitable bail happens on even the most simplest techniques where you're putting in the least amount of force (this can happen for various reasons including but not limited to being tired, not paying attention, mind simply blanking out at the moment of execution, etc). Zac has already given you an example of this above. I was about to post a similar experience of mine where I was saved just because of my strength on a very simple jump gone wrong, which I had performed perfectly a few times before, but not to the point of fatigue, neither did my mind blank out, nor was I not paying attention, but simply because my foot accidently got hooked in the railing I was doing a monkey over. But by the time I got here the thread had already taken a different turn so I decided not to. Everyone else training with me at that time (who would fit your bill of being less conditioned corresponding to their level of experience in parkour) who witnessed the bail, saw how it could have crushed my face or my chest, and how I saved myself because of good chest strength, and mentioned to me that if it would have been any of them in my place, even if after the bail they would have done the same as me to save themselves, they could not have, simply because their bodies lacked the strength to hold them in place and would have given way, still ending up crushing themselves by the fall on the block of stone we were supposed to be precisioning over.

Bottom line - both points of view are valid and have their own place in training and safety - you just have to learn where to balance between the two.



Also, although people that are capable of learning on their own have been rare in the past, all people have the potential to think that way. It's just a fault with traditional learning methods that most people are discouraged from forming their own ideas.
I have seen people that even when encouraged to learn on their own from early on, simply lack the self-discipline or the inclination/will to learn or to teach things to themselves, and are still dependent on others to push them.
Maybe only a thorough study conducted on this phenomenon will solve this debate. Since we have never actually fostered an environment where learning by your own and discovering things for yourself is encouraged, whether in a controlled situation or out in the real world, we cannot really be sure if this is possible.
« Last Edit: February 03, 2010, 11:22:24 AM by NOS - from Parkour Mumbai »

Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #89 on: February 01, 2010, 08:50:10 PM »
"that means it is the student that needs to determine what is taught."

Tell me if you are saying this, because I think I am taking this really the wrong way:

The teacher is only good if the student learns - so yes, each student is different and you can't just "say the same thing" to each student.

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Offline NOS - from Parkour Mumbai

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #90 on: February 01, 2010, 09:58:14 PM »
Sorry to hijack your nightly argument with Dave for a while Mark, but I just wanted to state some of my updated views on the original subject of this post. ;D


I sat and read through Corndogg's thread above, read all 3 pages seeing both sides of viewpoints (as well as both pages of Sean Hannah's related thread on the sfpk forums referenced in that thread) in order to form a more objective opinion on this whole thing.


I think my main gripe with this certification thingy is this:

I don't like the line where they state that "any level 3 instructor can come and supervise your class at any time he wishes to." I don't care if it is Yann Hnautra or Seb Foucan himself who comes down to my class, but I for one certainly do not like the idea of anyone coming and forcefully interfering in my proceedings, or imposing any 'rules and regulations' on me. Sure, if either of them ask me if they could come down to watch a class, I'd be more than happy and honored to have them visit, but if they decide to simply, forcefully make an entry on the grounds that 'we are the governing body and we want to inspect and ratify that you're doing exactly as you were taught in the certificate course', then I'd be one pissed off traceur. Some of the ideas listed in their qualifications section under expectations are beginning to sound more like a government institution's policies & interference and redundant red-tape to me more than a well meaning traceur body laying down guidelines for how people wishing to teach Parkour should proceed.

Parkour is after all, a free discipline devoid of rules. What we have instead is just some basic guidelines as to what Parkour is and isn't, and how should practitioners progress in Parkour while learning it from scratch. And I don't think we need a certification course to ensure that these guidelines are followed.

I know I follow safe practices and proper training progression in my classes even though I charge people for it. If I'm comfortable with my method of training, and my students are comfortable with it, I won't have someone come and tell me what to do or what not to do in my class just because they do not agree with my methods.
I'd rather have my teaching methods reviewed by the community rather than follow the dictats of some self-appointed 'governing body', ironically comprised of the same individuals who came up with the philosophy of 'no ranks, no rules and no competitions for parkour'.

(I'm not taking the introduction of certifications for parkour trainers personally, I'm just presenting my thoughts on the certification process from a personal point of view.)

What are we going to start with next? Certifications/belts for proficiency in Parkour training? Create levels of skill proficiency a guy can achieve in Parkour and Freerunning and start awarding ranks to them as and when they do? ("Hi, my name is Yann Hnautra, and I'm a black belt in Parkour." New guy at Rendezvous 5 - "Oh, that makes me a white belt then. How many years is your certification course to get me a black belt like yours?")
Because with certifications for instructing on the horizon now, that's where we seem to be headed in the future.


(Okay, and I mean no offence to either Yann or Seb, I have great respect for both the guys and their skills, I just used their names to demonstrate an example.)
I would like to take back some of what I said before, and after seeing some things happen over here in Mumbai/India, I do think certifications for teaching parkour would actually do the community some good and ensure better instruction.

Because now that I look back at my previous post, I think I did take the introduction of certifications personally, as an intrusion in my own classes, assuming certifications ever became mandatory at a later date.

I still feel that all a 'certification' does is point out to the prospective trainee/client that they can be assured they are in good hands, that the person teaching them knows his subject matter thoroughly and is capable of teaching it well.
If existing parkour classes/trainers around the world have built up that reputation through word of mouth and hard-work, they don't really need to get themselves certified even when certifications do get introduced to the mainstream. Because their reputation built over the years serves as their 'certification'.
But these certifications will greatly help those who come in later, and will help separate the grain from the chaff as far as sub-standard instructors are concerned, especially people who think that with 3-6 months of parkour skill training and some research about skill training and conditioning on the internet (but who have absolutely no clue about the actual philosophies of parkour or about proper physical training), they will become qualified enough to teach it to others for money. I am beginning to see what I just described above at an alarming frequency in India, and no amount of 'educating' these newcomer traceurs-who-want-to-start-teaching about the proper way to approach instruction of others is helping change the minds of even the well-meaning of these individuals, and I think enforcing a teaching standard will be the only way out of the dilemna of sub-standard instruction diluting and ruining our art and its reputation.

And I would prefer the ADAPT certification over APK's certification for teaching Parkour (for all the aspects of parkour, not just the physical ones) (based on whatever I know about each certification at the moment, my views might change since the full specifics of APK's certification are not yet known), because (as of now) ADAPT also stresses on a few important points like the trainer's ability to 'teach', his grasp of the concepts and philosophies of parkour, and how well he is able to impart that knowledge to his trainees. Because without these important points, a trainer will simply impart physical training to his trainees, and simply teach them to 'jump around'. Parkour isn't parkour without the philosophies now, is it?
From what little I know about it right now, I feel APK's certificate is nothing more than a more comprehensive physical trainer's certificate that focusses on the physical aspects of teaching parkour only, and doesn't ensure that the trainer can effectively pass on the 'art'.

I do not have to agree with PKGen's/Majestic Force's methods of strength training and conditioning, and the introduction of 'levels' in teaching (which I believe might lead to levels in parkour itself at a future date), but I think I do agree with everything else about their certificate, including, I suppose, the point over which I raised the most hue and cry in my previous post - arbitrary interference of a higher up trainer who might show up to inspect how you conduct your class at any point.

I guess someone should take the best of both ADAPT's (the mental) and APK's (the physical) certifications and come up with an even better certification, leaving behind what is lacking in both.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2010, 08:30:35 PM by NOS - from Parkour Mumbai »

Offline jp2ykz

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #91 on: February 01, 2010, 10:02:05 PM »
There looks like there was a post or two while I was writing this so sorry for any redundancies.

Dave,

I did thoroughly read your post. ;)

You never clearly stated that you "weren't arguing against rules". If I am wrong please show me the quote. I also did not say that you were. I just said "that your definition of Parkour implies" no rules.

Quote
any rules designed for safety are effectively self-defeating in parkour in the long run.

And in fairness you also said that you could see the use of them in the short term when people were first learning.

You never said that you were against rules specifically, but that was what I got from it. It seemed like all of the examples you used you were basically against, with regard to PK. To be fair I will rephrase and say that your definition excludes "pointless rules" of which many of which you seem to think the majority are with regard to PK.  

Please give some examples of what you feel are pointless rules and good rules so I can have a better idea of where you are coming from.

Quote
I appreciate you feel you understand everything already

specifically I said that I was "well educated about the perspective." Not that I knew everything. just to clear that up.

I won't respond crassly to you in the future for the sake a smoother discussion.

With our mega marathon tiff, I was just angry at some of your tone and I responded to that mainly.

For the sake of getting down to the meat of stuff and finding the point where we can agree to disagree I think it would be a good idea to stick with one or two topics at a time so that we can boil stuff all the way down before moving on.

What do ya say truce.  :)

Now for a couple points in your post.

Quote
I'm also not arguing against instructors passing knowledge on to students. I'm saying that it is more useful to pass on only the parts that are useful to the student. Since every student is different, and since you are the only person that can understand your own goals properly, that means it is the student that needs to determine what is taught.

Quote
The teaching model you describe, where an instructor teaches a student the instructor's way first, is a model based on tradition. It's a good way of passing on a particular way. It ensures that priority is given to the instructor's thoughts, and justifies it with the assumption that the instructor knows more.
However, putting the instructor's views first is not good for the student. The student isn't the same person as instructor, and what worked for the instructor may not work for the student. The student only finds that out at the end, when they've spent years training in a way that may end up being useless to them. Only then can they start thinking for themselves, the most important skill in parkour.

It dose basically look like you were arguing against the instructor model that Disciple spoke of because that model is as you said based in tradition and as such wouldn't possibly change to the selective version that you explained.

Is what you would hope for a teacher student relationship where the student is able to dictate what is taught? Or like a peer to peer learning environment?

If this is so I can see where you are coming from and would agree with some parts of that being good.

Quote
You do have to make mistakes to learn. Learning means fixing holes in your understanding. If you don't know there's a hole there, you don't know to try and fix it.

My opinion on this is that an experienced instructor could know where those holes are and would be and could teach you about them and how to avoid them. I mean we are talking about climbing and jumping on stuff. I think the vast majority of PK have specific known ways of doing things.

Quote
Everyone places more importance on their own experiences than those of others.

I honestly don't... I look to those with more experience than I have to learn, daily. I think there is a ton of things in PK that you can learn without making mistakes.

I agree that you do learn well from mistakes. They are inevitable to a certain point. I just don't think they are the only way to learn and that many mistakes are avoidable either through self study or a teacher showing you. This speaks in part about what you said about spotting patterns. Good point on that one.
Konging low stuff is stupid. Just jump over it. Or just do a cool flip over it.

Offline DaveS

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #92 on: February 02, 2010, 06:20:27 AM »
NOS, with any luck the longer this discussion goes on the more clearly the views of all sides will be presented. :)

I agree that in any specific situation, being stronger will keep you safer.
However, my point is that as you get stronger the situations change. The stronger you get the more dangerous your training becomes, because the strength needed to resist injury in case of a mistake increases, but some aspects of strength don't.
Mistakes don't happen spontaneously. Everything happens for a reason, and people make mistakes because of misjudgements. We can get better at judging things.
Improvements in our judgement can help us avoid all serious injuries, but physical improvement can't.

Self-discipline and willpower are not genetic traits, they can be developed. They are very difficult things to teach, because the whole idea of someone else teaching them contradicts what they are trying to teach, but if a person is put in the right situations with the right level of challenge they can be developed.
I have seen people that have gone through this. Not many, true, but some. More importantly for me though, I've experienced it myself. Ten years ago I was mentally weak to the point of not even understanding what it was like to have goals and desires of my own, because every decision I made, from choosing subjects to study, to choosing which university to go to, to choosing which chocolate bar to buy, was made solely on the basis of what I thought other people would think of my choice. Fortunately, things changed :) .
You experience something, or a collection of things, that proves to you that you need to change and then you start changing. You spot a fault or a problem and act to correct or solve it. That basic principle applies whether it is physical strength you lack or mental strength.
In the BPCA at the moment, we refer to this as the need for a 'Memorable Example'.

I agree, a coaching qualification is absolutely just a way of trying to demonstrate who can coach to people who understand nothing about parkour, but the act of creating a qualification means also that coaches become more consciously aware of some of the aspects of coaching.
As you might expect, I happen to think that the BPCA coaching qualification contains a good balance of requirements. There's still room for improvement as with everything (version 2 is being typed up), but I think we've got a good basis in place.
I think the best way to improve coaching methods from here would be for all coaches and practitioners to work together and pool our knowledge, because as you say each existing group has their own strengths and every extra perspective is useful. If it is simply finding the best way to help people learn parkour that we're interested in then I see no reason for people not to work together.


Mark, I mean both that each student is different and so needs different help, and also that the student should decide what help the coach gives. I think coaching only works when both the coach wants to teach the lesson, and the student wants to learn it. If either of those are missing, I think the lesson is worthless.


JP, that's fine, as long as you understand now that I make distinctions between good and bad rules.
Quote
...other disciplines all require you to stay within some form of limits. Mainly, in accepting certain rules and behavioural restrictions. The uniforms, the etiquette, the grading systems, the use of language, the set techniques and exercises etc.
Those are the examples of impractical rules I listed before.

As I said to Mark above, I think learning has to be a cooperative process between coaches and students. So that the student understands the importance of the learning, I think the coach should demonstrate the holes/flaws rather than simply explain them. That way the student can integrally feel the need to learn, as well as be aware of it consciously. For me, that is the difference between a good coach and a bad coach, using experiences rather than words.
The coach gives the student an experience that shows the student the problem, and then both student and coach can work together to find the best solution for the student.
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Offline Zachary Cohn

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #93 on: February 02, 2010, 08:04:09 AM »
NOS, with any luck the longer this discussion goes on the more clearly the views of all sides will be presented. :)

Based on my decade+ of experience with "debates" on the internet, the above statement is not true.

Offline jp2ykz

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #94 on: February 02, 2010, 09:29:13 AM »
Holly crap,

I pretty much agree with your whole post!!

My only slight and rarely even relevant point would be in response to this paragraph.

Quote
Self-discipline and willpower are not genetic traits, they can be developed. They are very difficult things to teach, because the whole idea of someone else teaching them contradicts what they are trying to teach, but if a person is put in the right situations with the right level of challenge they can be developed.

I would say that just like your last paragraph says a good teacher could show a student a situation wherein he/she could learn self discipline as long as it was something the student wanted. And a really great teacher could show the student why that might be something that he/she wanted as long as the student would show up or be there for some (any other reason) on their own accord. Even then this is a very rare circumstance.

Also your last paragraph I agree with largely (especially for PK learning) but depending on the learning style of the individual (visual, kinesthetic, auditory, auditory-digital) words can be useful.

Konging low stuff is stupid. Just jump over it. Or just do a cool flip over it.

Offline ThePeacefulDragon

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #95 on: February 10, 2010, 03:07:23 PM »
Hey everybody.

I just wanted to touch base to let the State of Indiana know that we now have a certified and recognised Parkour Instructor available to us.

Ayren Steuerwald has recently returned from the UK after taking the long awaited A.D.A.P.T. certification Training brought forward by Parkour UK, Parkour Generations and Majestic Force.

Along with Ayren Steuerwald in the course graduates were Sebastian Foucan,  Joseph Boyle, as well as several other students whose names will be recognized in the next post.
Ayren is currently trying to follow the Parkour standard set by the governing bodies that created the certification and wanting to develop a strong Parkour presence in Indiana and the surrounding States.
Hard work, dedication and a strong sense of positive forward direction are the goals that we want to maintain, as well as freedom of creative thought and the mastery of movement.
The A.D.A.P.T. Training was a huge success and will help put Parkour in venues of practice and participation that would not have normally been reached without proper certification and reputable backing. Congratulations to all who made the effort to get to the training and congratulations to all who passed this monumental task.
Ayren currently teaches at A Plus Gymnastics in Noblesville Indiana and has become the first instructor to assist the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department in there Physical Training with the implementation of Parkour.
B.A.S.E. Fitness will be the new entity to be focused on the primary attributes of Parkour and will strive to provide a common ground for traceurs of all levels in the future.
B.A.S.E. stands for Balance Agility Strength  Endurance.
Hopefully we can all train safe, hard and dilligently to help the Art Du Deplacement grow and become a movement that is both recognised and respected by all who encounter it practitioners.

Offline Mark Lewis

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Re: PKGen's ADAPT Certification Officially Begins
« Reply #96 on: February 10, 2010, 09:44:57 PM »
Well that's one American who took the ADAPT cert. I wonder if there are any others thus far. What I would really like to see is a review from some of the participants. It would be nice to know how they felt about the process.
The strongest of seeds take root in hostile grounds. They don't fight the elements. They find thier harmony.