Author Topic: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...  (Read 8372 times)

Offline Cody Bolen

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #40 on: January 14, 2010, 07:02:25 PM »
*My idea of Competition is going to make the assumption that we have unlimited resources to work with.

There's is a Circular area with a Diameter of 200 meters, this area is filled with obstacles, none making one straight line or an equal height all the way through. The obstacles would be boxes and rails of various sizes and heights from the ground, none of them having an obvious movement to pass it (by that I mean no boxes that are made specifically for kongs, double kongs, or any other movement). There are lights that are around the rim of the circle and other places within the circle itself that contestants are required to reach. Here is the key element that is required for this to be fair for all competitors, no contestant may see the course before hand, they may not watch others runs or here of their times, and the series of lights must be in the same order to assure fairness. Best time indicates winner. Since the course is designed before hand there would be plenty of time to determine camera placement and such.

I think that the Red Bull Art of Motion has the freerunning comps covered, although it may not be popular amoung some of you, personally I like it.

Offline NOS - from Parkour Mumbai

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #41 on: January 16, 2010, 08:58:21 AM »
Quote from: Scared Doggy
If you create a competition with alot of requirements

So what would a competition framework be that doesn't have a lot of requirements, ie what would the most basic, open requirements be?  E.g. Run through X number of checkpoints in any order and get to a final checkpoint as fast as you can, across an obstacle course with natural, urban, and specifically man made obstacles?

Yeah, I guess that could work.
What we could do is have absolutely no rules or regulations at all, except for a few ground rules like - "This is the confined area in which we are holding the competition. Your starting point and destination are marked as Point A and Point B, with the area in between covered with obstacles. The only rule is to get from Point A to Point B as fast as you can, without going outside the confined designated area. The first one to get to Point B (or you can also have a timed run) wins.

And you might want to vary the positioning of the obstacles every competition to avoid the pitfall of having the neurological pathways of competitors getting used to a set pattern, and keep them on their toes all the time. You don't want people training for a competition memorising the placement of obstacles and the path they're going to take through it (like the Ninja Warrior competition), and in the process forgetting how to move naturally (kinda like Bruce Lee's argument against practicing set forms or katas).

Offline Mark Lewis

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #42 on: January 17, 2010, 11:01:14 PM »
I believe the problems of competition have all been discussed to death. I also agree that competition is inevitable as Parkour becomes more popular and marketable (thus potentially profitable). If we accept competitions as a given, since we are all very aware of how many problems it could create, our best option is to make it our own before it gets made for us by individuals/organizations outside the community.

That said, we should try to design competitions that minimize potential downsides and emphasize values that we as a community say are important. It is important that we make all of our potential weakness into strengths. We need to take the threat of competition and turn it into an opportunity.

In designing games for my local group, I like to try to encourage problem solving and focus more than anything. The most enthralling are the ones that instill a sense of urgency in the practitioners. When there is an interesting problem, we naturally compete to solve the problems first or to provide a more elegant solution. Here are a few that seem to work the best:

Genocide
This is very similar to traditional tag. 1 person is the hunter. There must be predetermined boundaries to the game (spots with varied obstacles are the most fun). The hunter starts in a designated starting position, everyone else fans out. When each person is happy with their starting position they raise their hand in the air. When the hunter sees everyone with a hand int the air the round begins. The hunter then attempts to chase down and tag every other individual. When each individual is tagged they move outside the boundary of the game. When all individuals have been tagged the round ends. Each person rotates into the position of hunter once. The round is timed from start to finish with a stopwatch, shortest time is the winner.

Try this game in many different areas to further test your skills. I recommend shifting often and keeping boundaries relatively small for this one (expirement).

Fox and Hound
Just like genocide except you have one Fox and everyone else is a hound. The hounds begin in a pack at a designated starting point (boundaries of the game pre-set). The Fox chooses their starting position and signals with a hand. When the fox is tagged the round is over. Each person rotates into the position of the Fox once. The rounds are timed by stopwatch, longest time wins.

Again, different locations add more flavor. This game however works better with a larger boundary than Genocide.

Fruit Thief
This is yet another tag variation. This one can be slightly altered to change things significantly, but this is what I believe works best:

Assign everyone a number, write the numbers on a slip of paper, draw them randomly. Put the names in a bracket as drawn (bys are okay for friendly competitions). Choose boundaries for the game as well as a starting point for each player (I find it is best to start the players within 10-20ft of each other). Before each player faces off, flip a coin to determine who the thief is. Once the players are set, the thief has to evade the other player for 3 minutes. If successful, the thief moves on. If not, the other player moves on. Continue eliminating until a winner is crowned.

Try this game in different areas. Try it with more or less time on the clock. Try it with different initial placements. If you are familiar with everyone's abilities don't be afraid to seed match-ups accordingly.

Scarves
This is probably my favorite. Give everyone in you group a scarf or bandanna and head to one of your favorite training spots (or anywhere really). Choose a starting point. Let everyone stand at the starting point together for a moment and have a look around. At once, everyone picks a spot to tie (or simply drop) their scarf. Once the scarves are in place each person must begin at the start and then collect each scarf (in no particular order) as fast as possible. Reset the scarves after each run so that everyone tries the same scarf positions once. Fastest time wins.

Try many different scarf locations. Try this game in many different locations. Give everyone 2 scarves to place instead of one.

---------

I think all of these could be slightly adapted to provide a solid event for a Parkour comp. In general I like the idea of using naturally occurring locations and changing location for each successive comp. So long as boundaries and starting positions are standard the games remain pretty fair. I think that randomizing locations and the random pairings in Fruit Thief are "fair" over many trials (law of big numbers). If you were to use only these events for a comp, you could test a broad range of ability by simply putting each event in a different location. This would keep things interesting for both competitors and viewers. I also believe that games along these lines emphasize the best of what we try to encourage in Parkour while still providing a competitive proving ground for skills that just plain work.

As far as "winning" is concerned, I would handle it like this: name a winner for each individual event, create an overall set of standards that reflect our ideals to be judged over each event and score them in terms of points (each competitor would have a score in every category for each event), the highest scoring competitor would receive a separate title (in essence winning the entire comp). In this way we can promote adherence to specific ideals in every individual event and create a situation where it is entirely possible to win the comp without winning any individual events.

I don't feel like digging further into specifics would be any more illuminating to this line of thought. The rest is pretty much nuts and bolts. What do you think?
The strongest of seeds take root in hostile grounds. They don't fight the elements. They find thier harmony.

Offline Corndogg

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #43 on: January 18, 2010, 10:30:02 AM »
I don't feel like digging further into specifics would be any more illuminating to this line of thought. The rest is pretty much nuts and bolts. What do you think?


The more specifics we define, the less specifics corporations define  ;D
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Offline Zachary Cohn

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #44 on: January 18, 2010, 10:38:24 AM »
Three ideas I had. I haven't been able to test them yet:

"Flow"
-Grab any one obstacle.
-Create a 5-10 second flow routine with that obstacle.
-Bonus points for using not-standard vaults, interesting and unique applications of standard vaults.
-Judged on creativity, flow (how smoothly everything fits into each other). Speed is a factor, but not weighed heavily.

Grab & Return 3 Flags.
-A TON of obstacles come out, the entire class moves everything around and sets up the obstacles. The Arbitrator puts 3 flags throughout the course (on, in, under things. At least partially visible), and the runner has to grab one, return it to a central "bin," then go for the next one. At the end, they have to return to the starting box.
-The whole event is timed.
-Also a "Coolest solution" voted on by everyone else. Get points for doing things differently (how you use the obstacles, flags, etc).
-Two runs, take the best time.

Flag Relay
-Set up an obstacle field.
-Separate into two teams.
-There are two stopwatches, one for each team.
-Team A starts, their stopwatch starts, and they have to plant a flag and return to the start.
-Team B has to retrieve the flag (while their stopwatch is running). Team B then plants the flag, and then Team A retrieves it.
-Each team is timed on planting the flag and retrieving the flag, and the team with the lowest final time wins.

Offline Mark Lewis

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #45 on: January 18, 2010, 10:45:40 AM »
Three ideas I had. I haven't been able to test them yet:

"Flow"
-Grab any one obstacle.
-Create a 5-10 second flow routine with that obstacle.
-Bonus points for using not-standard vaults, interesting and unique applications of standard vaults.
-Judged on creativity, flow (how smoothly everything fits into each other). Speed is a factor, but not weighed heavily.

Grab & Return 3 Flags.
-A TON of obstacles come out, the entire class moves everything around and sets up the obstacles. The Arbitrator puts 3 flags throughout the course (on, in, under things. At least partially visible), and the runner has to grab one, return it to a central "bin," then go for the next one. At the end, they have to return to the starting box.
-The whole event is timed.
-Also a "Coolest solution" voted on by everyone else. Get points for doing things differently (how you use the obstacles, flags, etc).
-Two runs, take the best time.

Flag Relay
-Set up an obstacle field.
-Separate into two teams.
-There are two stopwatches, one for each team.
-Team A starts, their stopwatch starts, and they have to plant a flag and return to the start.
-Team B has to retrieve the flag (while their stopwatch is running). Team B then plants the flag, and then Team A retrieves it.
-Each team is timed on planting the flag and retrieving the flag, and the team with the lowest final time wins.

I really love Flow and Flag Relay. I will definitely be trying these out very soon. Thanks for the ideas Zach!
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Offline Zachary Cohn

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #46 on: January 18, 2010, 11:13:07 AM »
Thanks! I'm hoping to try them out at Primal Fitness soon, just need to wait for a really big class of advanced students.

Offline DaveS

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #47 on: January 18, 2010, 07:46:27 PM »
Despite the fact that anti-competition statements are apparently not allowed in this thread, to answer this question I have to start with this statement. If I was in charge of organising a parkour competition then the first thing I would do would be to make sure that there was a specific purpose behind organising the competition and that there wasn't a better way of achieving it.
(Aside: I did read Rafe's article, but all it convinced me of was that more thinking needs to take place and that too many people prefer to give up rather than face difficulties. I'm still not convinced competition is inevitable, I've seen no strong evidence to indicate that competition is more useful than alternatives, and I still don't think a competitive attitude is in any way desirable within parkour.)
Whatever you might think about competition, I think it would be a good idea for everyone to follow this line of thought through if only to try and produce a better way of explaining it to the rest of the community. If it does prove useful, then the more people support it and are involved the more useful it will be. Personally I think it's a crazy idea to do anything without a solid understanding of why you're doing it and a thorough exploration of alternatives. You need to hear opposing arguments (whole arguments, not just brief opinions) to make sure your own are strong.


So, to make a competition worthwhile you would need to ensure positive effects while eliminating the negative effects.

Participants, organisers and spectators should all get something useful out of it. It should be useful from the perspective of both parkour (development of practical, fundamental skills) and the people themselves if they aren't practitioners (fun, enjoyment). Everyone should enjoy themselves and develop skills or learn something.

Goals
These need to be the same as for parkour itself. Which means they should be as close to those of real life as possible. The best way to do this is simply to get the practitioners to practise parkour itself. The organisers set the precise nature of each obstacle and each participant tries to overcome it on their own (this is how many Bouldering competitions work, a sport very close to parkour). The organisers benefit from the challenge of identifying the obstacles, practitioners benefit from the challenge of getting past them, and spectators benefit from seeing solutions to realistic problems they might face.
If you wanted to expand it you would set obstacles that required other skills as well as movement, to test how effective a person's training has been at preparing them for life. You would also allow participants to talk to each other about the obstacles and share suggestions, adding in a test of communication.

Ranking/Placing
With obstacles it's easy. Whoever gets past the obstacles to the destination is a success, and it's impossible to argue as long as the environment is kept the same for all.
With keeping it to parkour, each obstacle has clear success and failure. There is even no need for an overall winner. You could have multiple winners for each obstacle, and different winners for each obstacle. That way you could bypass all the negative effects from having only 1 winner and many losers, including competitiveness, at the same time as highlighting the fact that everyone is different. You also bypass the many problems from subjective judges.

Values and ideals
Those of parkour and none other. Development of all fundamental capabilities to help people get past all obstacles.
That covers everything positive and useful, and rejects everything harmful and pointless.

Location
Wherever new and varied obstacles exist. That shouldn't be very limiting for creative organisers, as we all have to go through this process in order to practise parkour. Would also mean non-practitioners would find it harder to organise similar things, another benefit. Obstacles should exist already, to make sure they are realistic. You could either use a variety of locations, or else recreate existing obstacles in a particular area in a realistic way.

Course requirements/length
Everything. As much variety as possible. Specific obstacles can be long or short, but they should be challenging in a variety of ways. Obstacles shouldn't be adjustable because it's unrealistic, and unfair because of the inconsistent ways in which different obstacles can be adjusted.

Rules
Same rules as life, i.e. none. Get to the destination. You get there, you're a success and you win.

Entry requirements
To keep things realistic and to make sure movement tests all skills (including mental ones) no participant should be insured and no safety measures taken by organisers. No safety measures makes the situations real and forces participants to think and rely on themselves, making it a fair and accurate test. Otherwise, physically fit but mentally weak practitioners will be more successful, which is the reverse of reality.

Awards
None. Everyone benefits intrinsically so a parkour practitioner has no need. Extra rewards makes it unrealistic and therefore less useful. It also reduces the cost, reducing the need for immoral corporations.

Overview
Organisers identify a series of obstacles, complete with start and finish. Participants try and get from start to finish, attempting the obstacles in the same order. Their either do or don't succeed. That's about it.


We know the basic format works because it's used in Bouldering. It's still not ideal, because there would still be some fame attached to succeeding and therefore some corruption of goals, but it gets past most of my objections and it's a sight better than the dance-offs.
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Offline Gabe Arnold

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #48 on: January 18, 2010, 08:51:47 PM »
^ Ninja Warrior/obstacle course with no monetary reward and more attention paid to the mental aspect.

I don't mean to belittle a sound idea (I like it a lot actually) but what you've described is essentially that. In Ninja Warrior there can be multiple winners or no winners, much like you said. The contestants are given a problem to solve (the course) and few limitations other than to stay to the course. They are allowed to discuss with other contestants and often form cadres of friends. (The All-Stars, for example) There is a relatively small reward for the effort involved (barely $10,000 I think) so the goal is an internal one. Makoto Nagano may have become famous for winning and makes a little cash for appearances but I believe he still pilots a fishing boat - he hasn't "sold out." And many people who watch the show are inspired to try it themselves, thus they start to workout and frame a mind for overcoming obstacles and problems.

Again, not trying to cut short your idea, but it's a modified Ninja Warrior in my opinion. And that's not a bad thing at all, because it proves it can be done and done well. (Although I think some kind of safety measure has to be made, if nothing else a physical or test at the beginning to make sure contestants are capable people.)

Offline DaveS

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #49 on: January 19, 2010, 04:07:27 AM »
Yes, that does sound similar to what I described. So that's another reason to think that it would be viable.

I've only ever seen a couple of short clips from Ninja Warrior so I've no idea about the background organisation. The courses there seem pretty varied but rarely approach anything realistic, so that would seem to be the major difference with my idea. I forgot to mention it explicitly before, but included with the idea of realism would be the idea that participants couldn't study the obstacles beforehand to prepare specifically for them.

Why do contestants have to be capable? I would think it would be far better to have a range of ability levels to show spectators the proper perspective. That would reduce the chances of people thinking they can automatically do it and trying it for themselves in dangerous situations.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2010, 04:11:00 AM by DaveS »
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Offline Jacob Siler

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« Reply #50 on: January 19, 2010, 06:48:17 AM »
I agree with a lot of things said, sorry for some repeats
1. skill proficiency (i.e) highest wall run, longest vault, fastest rail QM, ect.
2. Sprint course 100-400meters w/ several obstacles and options for directions
3. endurance course - 5k with options and obstacles (i.e) can't touch stairs, stride runs, QM section
4. Navigation section with check points and mandatory obstacles and checkpoints, like a true urban adventure race. possible combined with the endurance course.
5. Demo course. Jam session format with the participants as judges.

Everyone that competes a time trial or race gets a gift bag, like running a marathon.
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Offline jp2ykz

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #51 on: January 20, 2010, 11:01:29 PM »
I envision Tons of different and interesting categories down the road as more attention gets payed.

For now I will just give a basic breakdown of a really efficient way to get this type of thing off the ground with out big corporate sponsorship. At the same time it should be attractive to corporate sponsors Money is good for Traceurs not bad!!!

Build a course out of things that many Traceurs have like paracubes and other variations there of, and scaffolding if possible. These should be put it into an environment that is already ideal for PK (like a college) Getting permission is the hard part even if it is a city park but definitely doable. Others on the sight have more experience with this stuff than me and it will probably require some foot work too.

This is so there is a high volume of obstacles in a smaller than normal area and it will be more exciting!!!

I would have some music playing in down times if possible to keep people from getting board when there is down time for one reason or another. Who knows some competitors may want music for their runs.

I think when every one is seated that some one has a speech prepared that explains the history, definition of parkour and where the sport is going including free running. Then they should announce the basic layout and judging of the competition.

There should be a few category's only at first because too much too soon will just make it look disorganized and  if any of you have ever helped with events of any type; putting one on is allot harder than it looks.

My ideas to keep it simple for categories are:

#1: The speed course. This will entail all participants to do time trials along a set course laid out by an experienced Traceur. There should be three routs total. One that has more ground level stuff and is focused on pure speed. The next one should have a focus on more technical things like precisions, climbing, balance, strength. The third should be a hybrid between the two. The participants should have multiple ways to approach the obstacles but must stay within certain parameters of the course that is laid out so that it can be effectively timed. The best combined time will win and separate recognition should be given to the winners of the other races if it's not the same person. I'll talk more about prizes and winning abit later.

#2: 
Skill. This is the closest to freerunning. This part of the contest will be all technical stuff feats of balance strength skill moves like wall spin/flips tricking moves. There should be three categories that this section is judged on within a set time limit around 2 to 5  minutes (not sure how long the contestants will last doing full intensity moves.)

The categories for judging should be difficulty creativity of use of course and flow. So if some idiot just did tricking combos wouldn't really score that high.

#3:
This is a hybrid category speed and power is paramount and there is no time limit. Anything goes; difficulty, course creativity and use, speed and power, flow and style are all judged. This session really favors the highly conditioned athlete with all of the skills of a modern Traceur/Freerunner.

Now for the the awards ceremony. Of course first second and third of all of the categories and classes
(Girls 13-17, Girls 18 and up, Boys 13-17, Boys 18 and up.) In the future you may add an aperture and pro division Pros compete for cash and amateurs compete for prizes. Also team categories may be a good idea.  But in the beginning just keep it simple with the age groups.
Prizes will have to depend on the event and the organizer and be based on the resources available. Either cash from event sales or sponsors, sponsor prizes, acclaim, a ribbon or trophy or whatever can be pulled off. Also there should be a couple off categories like best up and comer, best single run (from the speed challenge category) if someone did well in all categories, strongest runner, most stylish, most powerful. These are really up to the event organizer and may wanted to be mentioned to the contestants before the competition but the organizer should maintain a little flexibility encase something happens in the event that is really note worthy. These categories will be more clear after a few events and being able to play with what dose and doesn't work well. Be creative and take input from contestants and spectators/sponsors.         

That's pretty much it just make sure you have a really good, legally sound waiver and ALL contestants sign it and your golden.

After you get the hang of this event framework that has in similar form worked for high school snowboard teams and small town skate contests and feel confident with what has been proven to work you can adapt the framework, add different aspects or create new and different competition circuits.

PS. I do recommend if possible setting up a few events during summer season preferably (but also dependent on where you live.) This is so the contestants have a set training schedule to keep and they aren't caught off guard by a surprise event that is in a less than optimal point of their training schedule.

Hope this helps If I left anything out or you have questions please let me know and I will do my best to help.   

I left out marketing and sales for the event because its late it's allot to get into but if you are interested I wouldn't mind giving some ideas.   
Konging low stuff is stupid. Just jump over it. Or just do a cool flip over it.

Offline Fletcher Hawke

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #52 on: January 21, 2010, 07:29:04 AM »
Short version: if I were in charge of creating a parkour competition I would do one of three things.

1.  Push alternatives.

2.  Similarly, eliminate every truly "competitive" aspect possible --make something along the lines of Sasuke or Dave S' idea above.  No judging, no style points, no ranking or top time.  Complete or don't.  Then do my best to keep parkour and freerunning out of the actual name.

3.  If the organizers wouldn't go for either, tell them to go f*** themselves and walk away.




Dave S already put it more thoroughly, more eloquently (and more tactfully) than I am inclined to.  Parkour becoming more prominent is probably inevitable.  The various hows--of which competition is only one--are not.  Competition, at the very least with any real staying power or influence, is only inevitable if you make it so.  Even if it were, I have serious doubts about the logic or wisdom in joining the competitive push as "damage control."  There's a fine line between compromise and complicity.

Offline Corndogg

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Offline jp2ykz

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #54 on: January 21, 2010, 02:53:22 PM »
Yeah there are allot of good ideas both in those threads and this one.

I do like the touch points for the speed competition to allow for greater freedom by participants. But lots of the stuff that has never been done before or quarantining off large sections of a city and getting permission is simply unfeasible.

Allot of creative ideas are great to think about and have ideas for the future but it is most important for events to be successful. Events are HARD to organize, market and pull off. There is lots of stuff that is not being taken into account by many of the people posting and it doesn't sound like many of them really care (or maybe just don't know what it really takes) if an event is successful. Just that it is true to an arbitrary, vague and illusive concept of what "real" Parkour/Freerunning "should" be.

"Real" Parkour/Freerunning to me is part of a personal and social evolution that WILL change, like all things do.

I just want it to be successful and continue to be a thoughtful discipline. So I just want to add a bit of realism to this thread so that when these events do go down people have a useful and pertinent resource.

PS. I am not saying that people aren't being sincere. There are allot of useful and good ideas here.

I just want to make sure that the very real technical challenges of putting on an event, are honestly considered.  :)     

Konging low stuff is stupid. Just jump over it. Or just do a cool flip over it.

Offline Rafe

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #55 on: January 30, 2010, 07:11:02 PM »
Everyone interested in competive obstacle coursing should check out this thread and the videos in it.
http://www.americanparkour.com/smf/index.php/topic,24008.0.html
I shall not fear, fear is the mind killer the little death that precedes total obliteration

I will face my fear, I will let it pass over and through me and were it is gone, I will turn the inner eye and see its path, and only I will remain.

Offline jp2ykz

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #56 on: January 30, 2010, 09:46:26 PM »
I really want to check it out but just links to a bunch of thread topics (kind of like when you hit the home button but with some retired threads and other stuff).

I didn't see the specific thread that you were referring to??
Konging low stuff is stupid. Just jump over it. Or just do a cool flip over it.

Offline Rafe

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #57 on: January 30, 2010, 09:49:42 PM »
weird its works for me check out the ultra obstacle course thread in pics and vids.
I shall not fear, fear is the mind killer the little death that precedes total obliteration

I will face my fear, I will let it pass over and through me and were it is gone, I will turn the inner eye and see its path, and only I will remain.

Offline jp2ykz

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #58 on: January 31, 2010, 04:20:03 PM »
I found it.

Thanks!

Looked like a good test of conditioning incorporating allot of Parkour like stuff. However, by looking at it it doesn't seem to be Parkour to me. I mean I guess some could look at it and say that it is Parkour but for me it would have to have more urban style obstacles.

Definitely cool food for thought though..

It's always smart to know what others have done before because they have probably thought it out allot better than you if it is your first time,

Konging low stuff is stupid. Just jump over it. Or just do a cool flip over it.

Offline Rafe

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Re: If YOU were in charge of creating a Parkour Competition...
« Reply #59 on: January 31, 2010, 05:01:09 PM »
However, by looking at it it doesn't seem to be Parkour to me. I mean I guess some could look at it and say that it is Parkour but for me it would have to have more urban style obstacles.

Why do you think parkour is defined by the type of obstacle, can the ability to overcome obstacles not be trained in natural enviroments in designed enviroments what makes something acceptably parkoury terrain? Personally nothing bugs me more then when people refer to parkour as an urban sport when the first videos made by David and Co feature both natural and man made enviroments and David Says it can be practiced in the artifical or natural enviroment. When the the yamakasi say they body of ADD was born in Evry but the spirt was born in sarcelles(in the forest). Running, jumping and climbing are running and jumping and climbing whether you do them in the city, the woods, the beach or on a military obstacle course.
I shall not fear, fear is the mind killer the little death that precedes total obliteration

I will face my fear, I will let it pass over and through me and were it is gone, I will turn the inner eye and see its path, and only I will remain.