Author Topic: I need help  (Read 4408 times)

Offline Ryan Drake

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Re: I need help
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2009, 06:11:16 PM »
So your two goals are:
1) Clean out your diet [in terms of quality]
2) Gain 14+ lbs of muscle in 6 months' time

For goal 1 I'd start by eliminating all liquid calories. So basically, if there's a liquid going into your mouth, it's just water.

After about 2 weeks of acclimating to that, I'd then start by eliminating grains. After 2 weeks of that (month total now), come back and you can progress from there.


I'm really proud you threw down the money to get Starting Strength. It'll probably be one of the best investments in your life.


ps: Of goals 1) and 2), which is more important to you?


#1 is by far more important

I also got a free copy of starting strength from Patrick Yang   :)

As for liquid calories, I pretty much only drink water (I don't like soft drinks).  I just need to get rid of my iced tea addiction.

I'm just not sure about dairy.  I'll be drinking 2 glasses of milk / day, but how much cheese and how many eggs?

Going to buy what I need tomorrow, thanks for everyones help! :)

Offline Patrick Yang

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Re: I need help
« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2009, 07:02:06 PM »
I also got a free copy of starting strength from Patrick Yang   :)

Nota bene: I still advocate obtaining it in dead tree format, since it's much, much more useful in that form.  The electronic format is great for when you've got your laptop and don't want to lug around a book too, I find the physical format much better.
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Offline Dudley

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Re: I need help
« Reply #22 on: December 14, 2009, 09:11:55 AM »
If you have read the articles and browsing the forum you probably know some of this, but I'm including it because it is relevant.
To gain mass, you need to eat more than you are currently eating. An approximation for maintaining your weight (as a male) with an active lifestyle is 16 calories per pound, per day.
So this means that at your weight of 126 * 16 = 2016 calories, every day. To gain, as I said, you should eat more than this.

To make sure you get enough protein to gain muscle mass, you should aim to eat at least 126 grams of protein (minimum), every day. (Your BodyWeight in grams of protein)
Varying color of fruits and vegetables will help to add variety to your diet.

Protein sources for ovo-lacto vegetarians:
Whole Milk, this should be be your first choice for protein and a great aid in weight gain, milk will become easier to drink as you drink more and more to get used to it. I would recommend starting at 4 cups per day and work your way up to 8 cups per day (half-gallon). This is part of what Jake mentioned in starting small, you don't want to overload your system at once just jumping to a half-gallon of milk per day. 1 ounce of milk contains 1 gram of protein, a half gallon (64 fl.oz.) contains 64 grams of protein, this is why milk has become such a regular part of many of our diets.

Eggs An egg (white and yolk) contains 12 grams of protein and 9 grams of fat. This should be balanced out with fruits and vegetables for the healthiest carbohydrate option.

Peanut Butter is primarily a source of fat, but also contains a decent amount of protein. Make sure to natural or organic peanut butter, as to avoid partially hydrogenated oils (trans fat). Your best bet is to buy peanut butter made ONLY from peanuts (such as Adams PB) or to make your own, which can be done at Whole Foods, Sunflower Market, etc.

Brown Rice and Black Beans This is a source of protein, but also a significant source of carbohydrates, which will need to be balanced out by one or more healthy fat sources.

Quinoa This is also a source of protein, but is a carbohydrate source, which will need to be balanced out by one or more healthy fat sources.

Healthy sources of Fat:
Avocados, Seeds, Nuts, Nut Butters, Cocunuts, Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO)
EVOO shots (4 Tbsp) are a fast way to add healthy fat calories to your diet.
Make sure to consume fat with every meal.

Cheese is anditional source of fat that will help to add calories to your diet. Cheese also contains a small amount of protein.

Many vegetarian sources of protein (soy, seitan, tempeh, etc.) are significant sources of carbohydrates. Tracking your diet will help to make sure your keep a balance as not to unneccesarily overload on carbs.

Tracking your diet will also help to make sure that you intake the same amount of calories, grams protein, etc. each day.

Offline Schuman

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Re: I need help
« Reply #23 on: December 14, 2009, 02:39:35 PM »
Protein sources for ovo-lacto vegetarians:
Whole Milk, this should be be your first choice for protein and a great aid in weight gain, milk will become easier to drink as you drink more and more to get used to it. I would recommend starting at 4 cups per day and work your way up to 8 cups per day (half-gallon). This is part of what Jake mentioned in starting small, you don't want to overload your system at once just jumping to a half-gallon of milk per day. 1 ounce of milk contains 1 gram of protein, a half gallon (64 fl.oz.) contains 64 grams of protein, this is why milk has become such a regular part of many of our diets.

Dairy makes me gassy and bloated.
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Offline Steve Low

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Re: I need help
« Reply #24 on: December 14, 2009, 05:33:06 PM »
Dairy makes me gassy and bloated.

Then don't eat dairy
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Offline KC Parsons

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Re: I need help
« Reply #25 on: December 14, 2009, 07:40:36 PM »
If you have read the articles and browsing the forum you probably know some of this, but I'm including it because it is relevant.
To gain mass, you need to eat more than you are currently eating. An approximation for maintaining your weight (as a male) with an active lifestyle is 16 calories per pound, per day.
So this means that at your weight of 126 * 16 = 2016 calories, every day. To gain, as I said, you should eat more than this.

To make sure you get enough protein to gain muscle mass, you should aim to eat at least 126 grams of protein (minimum), every day. (Your BodyWeight in grams of protein)
Varying color of fruits and vegetables will help to add variety to your diet.

Protein sources for ovo-lacto vegetarians:
Whole Milk, this should be be your first choice for protein and a great aid in weight gain, milk will become easier to drink as you drink more and more to get used to it. I would recommend starting at 4 cups per day and work your way up to 8 cups per day (half-gallon). This is part of what Jake mentioned in starting small, you don't want to overload your system at once just jumping to a half-gallon of milk per day. 1 ounce of milk contains 1 gram of protein, a half gallon (64 fl.oz.) contains 64 grams of protein, this is why milk has become such a regular part of many of our diets.

Eggs An egg (white and yolk) contains 12 grams of protein and 9 grams of fat. This should be balanced out with fruits and vegetables for the healthiest carbohydrate option.

Peanut Butter is primarily a source of fat, but also contains a decent amount of protein. Make sure to natural or organic peanut butter, as to avoid partially hydrogenated oils (trans fat). Your best bet is to buy peanut butter made ONLY from peanuts (such as Adams PB) or to make your own, which can be done at Whole Foods, Sunflower Market, etc.

Brown Rice and Black Beans This is a source of protein, but also a significant source of carbohydrates, which will need to be balanced out by one or more healthy fat sources.

Quinoa This is also a source of protein, but is a carbohydrate source, which will need to be balanced out by one or more healthy fat sources.

Healthy sources of Fat:
Avocados, Seeds, Nuts, Nut Butters, Cocunuts, Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO)
EVOO shots (4 Tbsp) are a fast way to add healthy fat calories to your diet.
Make sure to consume fat with every meal.

Cheese is anditional source of fat that will help to add calories to your diet. Cheese also contains a small amount of protein.

Many vegetarian sources of protein (soy, seitan, tempeh, etc.) are significant sources of carbohydrates. Tracking your diet will help to make sure your keep a balance as not to unneccesarily overload on carbs.

Tracking your diet will also help to make sure that you intake the same amount of calories, grams protein, etc. each day.

Quite excellent post good sir. Though my only discrepancy is what you put for eggs i believe is actually 2 eggs. o.o

Offline Jake Vigil

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Re: I need help
« Reply #26 on: December 14, 2009, 09:25:35 PM »
Agree with KC.

1 Egg = 6g Protien, 5g fat (ish)
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Offline Chris Salvato

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Re: I need help
« Reply #27 on: December 14, 2009, 10:01:43 PM »
I disagree with a bit on this Dudley...mostly because none of these are sources that are high in protein density per gram..

Protein sources for ovo-lacto vegetarians:
Whole Milk, this should be be your first choice for protein and a great aid in weight gain, milk will become easier to drink as you drink more and more to get used to it. I would recommend starting at 4 cups per day and work your way up to 8 cups per day (half-gallon). This is part of what Jake mentioned in starting small, you don't want to overload your system at once just jumping to a half-gallon of milk per day. 1 ounce of milk contains 1 gram of protein, a half gallon (64 fl.oz.) contains 64 grams of protein, this is why milk has become such a regular part of many of our diets.

Dairy has some good protein in it but its very hard to call whole milk a protein source...its more like an "everything" source.  If you eat a plate of veggies with milk you are getting in more carb that protein by a long shot...even worse if its a plate of pasta.


Peanut Butter is primarily a source of fat, but also contains a decent amount of protein. Make sure to natural or organic peanut butter, as to avoid partially hydrogenated oils (trans fat). Your best bet is to buy peanut butter made ONLY from peanuts (such as Adams PB) or to make your own, which can be done at Whole Foods, Sunflower Market, etc.

It's really hard to call any source of nut a protein source.  Nut butters do have a high protein absorption rate but the ratio of fat calories to protein calories is often 2:1 or more.  If you are relying on nuts for protein then you are going to get WAY more cals from fat, usually.

Brown Rice and Black Beans This is a source of protein, but also a significant source of carbohydrates, which will need to be balanced out by one or more healthy fat sources.

Quinoa This is also a source of protein, but is a carbohydrate source, which will need to be balanced out by one or more healthy fat sources.

The amount of carb in quinoa and brown rice/black beans is heavily weighed out by carbs.  So much so that I don't even consider this as a protein source (and most definitely not a dense protein source) most times.  While they do have protein, the protein is not absorbed with the same efficacy of animal proteins so these are not really good options as far as protein sources.  The higher protein and fiber content of quinoa and beans, though, buffers the carbs and makes these a great source of carbohydrate if you aren't eating paleo and/or don't have a gluten sensitivity.

Many vegetarian sources of protein (soy, seitan, tempeh, etc.) are significant sources of carbohydrates. Tracking your diet will help to make sure your keep a balance as not to unneccesarily overload on carbs.

Its ironic that you say soy isn't a good source of protein just after you say that brown rice is...

Brown Rice = 3% protein by volume; ~11% calories from protein
http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5707/2

Fermented Tofu = 8% protein by volume; ~27.6% calories from protein
http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/legumes-and-legume-products/4398/2

That aside, you are right, most vegetarian protein sources have major draw backs.  Non-animal protein is usually not absorbed with much efficacy compared to animal protein.

So, back to my original advice - for dense protein sources you REALLY need to become a master of supplements....and those based in animal proteins such as whey and casein typically work best.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2009, 10:40:27 PM by Chris Salvato »

Offline Dudley

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Re: I need help
« Reply #28 on: December 15, 2009, 07:36:59 AM »
I absolutely agree with you Chris, my argument was to point to some vegetarian real food sources that contain protein, but to emphasize the drawbacks of these sources as they do not contain significant ratios of protein as compared to animal sources, but the vegetarian sources can be balanced with supplemental protein (whey, casein) in an observed balanced diet (this is why it can be very helpful to log your diet). Peanut Butter, milk and eggs all play an important role in my diet, but are carefully placed to maintain adequate levels of protein, carbs and, fat respectively to the remainder of my foods (meat, fruit, veggies, etc.). Soy, tofu, tempeh and seitan all contain some protein, but I did not elaborate on these further as my post was already becoming something of a short story...

I still stand behind whole milk as an excellent role in any diet for gaining. *Except the lactose resistant/intolerant diet*

Offline Patrick Yang

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Re: I need help
« Reply #29 on: December 15, 2009, 08:14:06 AM »
I still stand behind whole milk as an excellent role in any diet for gaining. *Except the lactose resistant/intolerant diet*

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