Author Topic: Martial Arts  (Read 15223 times)

Offline FireFly

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #40 on: August 23, 2006, 03:58:40 PM »
I said that the way forms are done in TKD are not the way I would do them, because it is not fluent. Like I have stated, "Fluency in your attacks is very important in fighting." If you can't do one move, and then fluently and quickly do your next, then your opponent will knock you down.

BTW, I know that it was one class's sloppiness, but I was stressing the fluency of it all.

Offline CyanideSoda

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #41 on: August 23, 2006, 05:58:58 PM »
 ;D I understand fluency. But the opinion that fluency is the most important thing is an opinion. I like fluency, and use it quite often. But i don't really know where i'm going with this. I'm not trying to defend TKD so much. It just seems that people underestimate it.


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Offline Nick

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #42 on: August 23, 2006, 08:27:21 PM »
I no almost nothing about martial arts, so I might be wrong here.  But ive heard that Iaido (sp?) is a martially art made up entirely of defensive manuevers (diverting punches to break arms, ect.) anyway my point is that this seems like it would be benaficial to someone who was already proficient in another martial art.
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Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #43 on: August 24, 2006, 06:22:01 AM »
Iaido is basically the art of drawing a sword. It is used essentially against a "surprise" attack although it can be used against a known attack of unknown timing (two people facing off with swords) Iaido is stripped down so that only the very bare essential movement is used. Part of the premise is that the aggressor always loses, as the defender can block the attack and strike in the same swift motion.

As for the notion the TKD is ineffective, I have a few former instructors who I'd love for you to square off with, it just may change your opinion. Yes, TKD is developed as a sport, however rigorous training in TKD will definitely prepare you for an actual fight. There are many low kicks, straight punches, etc practiced in TKD, and that is what someone would use in a fight. Just because you've seen high kicks in a movie doesn't mean that this is what someone trained in TKD would use to defend or attack in an actual situation. Tournaments are scored based on contact, and most contact is to the midsection, however it's very easy to "drop" those quick kicks to the legs or shins and cause a great deal of pain before a grappler ever gets to you. I'm not defending TKD so much as I am saying that I feel that people who discount it may not have tried it, or may not have seen people who are effective at it.

Someone in this thread said that it's not the art, it's the practitioner, I couldn't agree more. Bruce Lee wrote (loose quote, I don't remember it word for word) that we all have two arms and two legs, therefore the set of movements is limited.  This is very true, how different can a kicking style be? Yes, in TKD and other "sport" martial arts there can be a lack of full hip involvement resulting in a lack of full power, but in other martial arts people can be overly concerned with these things and never get an attack off because they are just too slow. There is a mix and a time and a place for everything. 

Personally I feel a person should stick with a martial art for at least two years before moving on to the next, otherwise you really can't understand what that art is supposed to do. At that point, if you feel you'd rather try something else, again, try it for at least a couple of years, you really can't (in my opinion) gain even an idea of what a martial art offers by taking it for a year, no matter what color belt they give you. In the end, the important thing (again, my opinion) is to find something that suits you, your body, your mindset, you will be most effective when something "fits" and "feels right" regardless of whether IT is the most effective, YOU will be most effective. 

I feel there is a parallel to Parkour. If you're out there trying to do every technique to the same level, then you're not listening to your own body, your own mind, and your own way. You have to see what fits you, and then develop from there.
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Offline Nick

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #44 on: August 24, 2006, 07:24:25 AM »
oooh my bad, I guess I had confused with aikido which has already been talked about, but I guess that theres a certain philosophy of patience that goes along with Iaido that could be loosely applicable to training for parkour, or anything for that matter.

edit: One of the things that I like about parkour and rock climbing is that its not a sport in which im required to simulate combat.  I tried martial arts for a little while, as well as fencing (briefly) and simply never really connected with what I was doing (though the agility and strength that can be gained through either of those are certainly a good thing to have).  This thread has made me think about seriously trying a martial art again.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2006, 07:30:33 AM by Nick »
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Offline Sat Santokh

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #45 on: August 24, 2006, 01:53:16 PM »
Iaido is what the martial art used in the old japanese tv series Zatoichi I think.  They also made a recent version called Zatoichi the blind swordsman which was awesome.  He just strikes very quickly and usually only once.


Fun Fact: The main actor is also one of the announcers in the show MXC.

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #46 on: August 27, 2006, 02:28:31 PM »
the art that i take is called Shaolin Chuan'fa, and is essentially a blend of northern and southern kung fu.  it is five animal kung fu, based off of leopard, snake, crane, tiger, and dragon styles, but there's other thrown in.  like M2 was talking about, hip movement is big.  in this system they stress that every movement should be powered from the center (or the 3rd chakra).  we also learn alot of grappling..which is good to know, but not the 'end all' that some people think it is. 

every art has its useful, and its not so useful, and this can vary alot person to person, and situation to situation.  for example, as a smallish person, the tiger techniques (based on lots of strengh/overpowering, etc) i learn are not going to be very useful to me on the street, whereas the snake (pressure point work, grappling, etc) and leopard (based upon pure speed)-style techniques may be of greater value. 

Offline Andy Animus Tran

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #47 on: August 28, 2006, 06:46:56 AM »
Mark, I couldn't agree with you more about the lowkicks and I think that is the best thing that TKD has to offer.  Very fast and VERY efficient when done properly.  I've seen very few TKD fighters who could use them as intended, but man... I've seen some where you couldn't even see the kick.  Unapproachable.  Was awesome.  It's just that on a whole, I see TKD as an inefficient martial art and the elements that ARE efficient are generally things that other martial arts share quite commonly.  The rigorous kick training seems to really come ahead in terms of the low kicks, definitely.

Steez, I don't think most people think of it as an "end-all" but rather that it's something VERY useful to know.  I believe to be a proficient fighter, you must have traditional fighting, grappling, and ground fighting under your belt.  I've fought a wrestler before and I never have trained ground fighitng at all...  All of my grapples were useless.  Quite in fact, EVERYTHING was useless.  It was very enlightening.  You must be able to react to anything and any situation and any fighting style.  It is certianly always most beneficial to be well-versed in those three arenas to be able to be the best martial artist you can be.

That said... I am STILL not proficient in all three and actually very poor at the martial arts that I used to have trained for years.  It's simply not been a regular part of my life anymore and my writing, my music, and my Parkour training have taken charge.  Still, I like a good discussion.
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Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #48 on: August 29, 2006, 08:35:03 AM »
Animus, agreed, especially that being well rounded will make you better prepared. I will stick to my point though that many people feel like taking 6 months of something then moving on makes them well-rounded, where I'll go ahead and stick my neck out and say you can't really learn what a martial art is supposed to do in less than 2 years of training in it at least 2-3 times a week :)

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Offline Andy Animus Tran

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #49 on: August 29, 2006, 09:31:17 AM »
Right.  I dd seven years of Binh Dinh Kung Fu and I hardly cnsider myself well-rounded becase it was nowhere near diligent enough.
Andy Tran, C.S.C.S.
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Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #50 on: August 29, 2006, 10:28:45 AM »
Funny thing about martial arts, the more you study the less you know ;)
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Offline Zeus

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #51 on: August 29, 2006, 01:51:23 PM »
M2 I agree with that statement completely

My instructor always says it is better to practice one technique three thousand times than three thousand techniques once

Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #52 on: August 29, 2006, 06:59:25 PM »
What I learned from Martial arts is the same as what I hope for people to learn from Parkour and Freerunning ... Martial arts isn't about learning how to fight, it's about learning about yourself.

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Offline pointman323

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #53 on: August 30, 2006, 06:21:57 AM »
although self defense is a good thing to know....just in case
"Its not that we're the best, its that everybody else sucks"

Offline Mark Toorock

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #54 on: August 30, 2006, 01:22:47 PM »
The art of diplomacy and negotiation is a better thing to know. Understanding your own boundaries, what you're willing to accept and compromise, and being secure with yourself are all far more important and more relevant to everyday life, and may help you to avoid needing self defense. However, learning self defense is a great way to gain the rest of these attributes. Figure that one out. :P
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Offline pointman323

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #55 on: September 02, 2006, 03:00:12 PM »
you just blew my mind
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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #56 on: September 03, 2006, 09:27:26 AM »
i completely agree with that about negotiation;  from what i've seen and known of people who practice martial arts, they are the people least likely to get into an altercation.  They seem to be much better at avoiding them. 

"the best block is to not be there"

Offline Barker

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #57 on: September 03, 2006, 09:51:46 AM »
KYOKUSHINKAI
White Rabbit Parkour

Offline Zeus

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #58 on: September 05, 2006, 06:44:23 PM »
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Is that the name of a martial art or ....... ummmm......???????????????

Offline jake

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #59 on: September 08, 2006, 02:04:06 PM »
what did steve irwin practice? i know he did some sort of jujistu.