Author Topic: Better as an unknown sport?  (Read 9492 times)

Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #40 on: August 12, 2009, 08:24:24 AM »
As for how well known parkour is, I hope it becomes a household term. 

Me too. Definitely.

As for the competition part...

Meh. Me personally, I'm ambivalent. I think competition and spectacles are inevitable. I think we need to be sure we are participating in the shaping of what competitions look like if we care about our discipline. As they say, "The world is run by the people who show up." I personally don't ever plan to compete in parkour, whether there are competitions or not. But if other people want to, awesome.

There will always be people who don't understand what we do and what it's "really" about (honestly, I don't think anyone can truly say they 'know what parkour is really about' and it's hubris to think so). Even now, without competition, there are a ton of people out there who think it's about roof-jumping and stunts and being a badass and all that stuff. I don't really see that changing much, and I don't really see the presence or absence of competition affecting that one way or another.

I sincerely hope that parkour becomes so well-known that, as Cameron stated, it's a household term and people everywhere practice it as a legitimate form of exercise and personal development. Throughout its history, there will be people who practice it more or less seriously than others. Its status as "underground" has nothing to do with how seriously people will take it or how fully people will understand it.

Parkour is not unique in this regard. Every physical discipline has a "continuum of seriousness" about it:

In martial arts, for every serious/traditional dojo, you have a bunch of Karate America studios. And for every Karate America studio, you have a bunch of kids breaking bricks and kicking eachother in the nuts for fun in their backyard, without any instruction, just to feel badass. Everyone is participating in the martial art in the way that is meaningful to them, and the traditional places aren't any worse off for it. They certainly aren't suffering for students, legitimacy, or understanding.

In yoga, for every serious/traditional ashram, you have a bunch of commercial yoga studios pandering to soccer mom types. And for every one of those studios, you have a bunch of people practicing yoga at home just from videos, without any attachment to the philosophy, just for stretching purposes. Everyone is participating in the yoga in the way that is meaningful to them, and the traditional places aren't any worse off for it. They certainly aren't suffering for yogis, legitimacy, or understanding.

In ballet, for every classical/traditional school, you have a bunch of "Dolly Dinkle" schools that teach nothing but a series of 'routines' rather than foundational technique. And for every one of those schools, you have a bunch of people just mimicking positions and steps at home, without any real instruction. Everyone is participating in the dance in the way that is meaningful to them, and the traditional places aren't any worse off for it.

If anything, the people in the "least legitimate" category may end up pursuing their art more seriously in the future and may find their way to a traditional/serious place. Or they will give up and move on to something else. At worst, they will hurt themselves; but as mentioned, the traditional art forms don't really suffer much as a result.

IMO people worry about this "mainstream" and "competition" thing way too much.
She followed slowly, taking a long time,
as though there were some obstacle in the way;
and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
--excerpt from Going Blind, Rainer Maria Rilke

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Offline Cameron Scott

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #41 on: August 12, 2009, 09:22:24 AM »
As for the competition part...

... "The world is run by the people who show up."
... if other people want to [compete], awesome.

Everyone is participating in the [pick any of Muse's great examples] in the way that is meaningful to them, and the traditional places aren't any worse off for it.

If anything, the people in the "least legitimate" category may end up pursuing their art more seriously in the future and may find their way to a traditional/serious place. Or they will give up and move on to something else. At worst, they will hurt themselves; but as mentioned, the traditional art forms don't really suffer much as a result.

100% agreed.  I especially liked the saying. :)

Offline Spencer B

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #42 on: August 12, 2009, 01:43:39 PM »
Main stream is fine. But yoga, martial arts, and even ballet have been around far longer than parkour. and let's not forget the image people have attached to them, mostly because of the history.

If you say martial art, people envision a serious, stoic man in a gi with a black belt practicing deadly moves and skills.

You say ballet dancer and people envision a pink tutu and the hard toed shoes and a graceful swan like ballerina dancing up a storm on a brightly lit stage.

You mention yoga and people, mostly because of the commercialization, will envision a studio lined with mats looking out into a street and people contorting their bodies in odd ways.

But if you mention parkour, or a traceur, people don't have a predefined image in their head, and if the first way they see it is a competition, then it will effectively become a sport to those people. Nothing more and nothing less. Get enough of them like this, and it becomes a sport, with a designated area to do it at, and with us expected to always do it there, or in competitions.

Imagine someone saying something like this;

 "What are you doing?!"
"Well I'm practising par-"
"I know what you're doing! It was rhetorical! My question is. why aren't you practising where you're supposed to?! Damn punks! My tax dollars went to build you that park so you practice your hardcore sport without you messin' up my property."

But I'm done arguing... I'm just going to sit back and wait... Hoping I'm wrong. But if I'm right...
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Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #43 on: August 12, 2009, 07:08:20 PM »
You're right, Spencer. Those examples I gave have been around far longer than parkour. Centuries. But I guarantee that, at the beginning, those early practitioners were wrestling with the same questions we're wrestling with now. In fact, women were not allowed to do ballet in its earliest days, and yet now it's considered a "primarily" women's activity (an imbalance which I find bogus but that's another thread completely). Even now there are some very different branches/approaches to yoga... some yogis view things like acro-yoga to be commercial, "impure" forms, and yet yoga somehow endures.

The point is that more people practicing it isn't going to harm it. I meet people every day who hear I am a (retired) ballet dancer and they say, "Oh yeah, I took ballet when I was 7, at this little neighborhood studio, for a couple summers." Their ballet is vastly different from my ballet. But ballet hasn't died because of it, and the cool part is, at least a lot of people get to experience ballet for a little bit, and have access to serious training if they wish it.

Parkour will end up the same way, with or without competition. Trust me.
She followed slowly, taking a long time,
as though there were some obstacle in the way;
and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
--excerpt from Going Blind, Rainer Maria Rilke

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #44 on: August 12, 2009, 07:56:10 PM »
I just realized why PK/FR feels weird as a contest... it is like having a contest about who can walk from here to there... not judging speed or technique, just, who can walk from here to there...  Because, as Traceurs and Traceuses, that is what PK/FR becomes, simply a mode of transportation (With a dash{lol} of fun {I chuckled because of the thought of Fun doing a Dash vault) but yea...  It becomes the same as walking... simply a movement that we enjoy to get us to our destination...  I actually find PK easier than walking because PK comes naturally (After 5 years of doing it, I'd at least HOPE that it'd come naturally lol)

But yea...  It is just a silly thought to have it as a competition... It isn't that sort of thing... it isn't being better, it is simply transportation, and that is what people don't understand...  it isn't all about looking better than someone else...  Competition in PK/FR is as silly as seeing who can trip and fall the best, because it isn't exactly something you do to be better than other people...

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Offline Trevor

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #45 on: August 13, 2009, 12:49:24 AM »
If Parkour falls like Skateboarding did, my reason and probably a majority of your reasons for doing parkour become null and pointless. No one will see the truth behind our words because they'll confuse us with the people who turn to Parkour because of the popularity it would drag in.
I don't think David Belle's and Sebastien Foucan's reason for founding parkour was so that it could become so mainstream, as you guys said before me, companies dip in to get profit for themselves.

I can understand some companies trying to make parkour gear with the traceur in mind and not just the money dipping in like that. But companies that don't care about the traceur and only care about the money dipping in would just be... wrong.


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Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #46 on: August 13, 2009, 06:26:59 AM »
My reasons for doing parkour have absolutely nothing to do with whether or not there are companies making parkour products, or whether or not people know about it. I do parkour for me and me alone.

What were Belle's and Foucan's reasons for founding parkour? Have you spoken with them? Do you know what their reasons were?

Foucan has done more than almost anyone to make parkour mainstream, and that's a good thing.

Let me ask you this, 22: How did you get into parkour?

She followed slowly, taking a long time,
as though there were some obstacle in the way;
and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
--excerpt from Going Blind, Rainer Maria Rilke

www.madisonparkour.com

Offline Spencer B

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #47 on: August 13, 2009, 08:54:43 AM »
You're right, Spencer. Those examples I gave have been around far longer than parkour. Centuries. But I guarantee that, at the beginning, those early practitioners were wrestling with the same questions we're wrestling with now. In fact, women were not allowed to do ballet in its earliest days, and yet now it's considered a "primarily" women's activity (an imbalance which I find bogus but that's another thread completely). Even now there are some very different branches/approaches to yoga... some yogis view things like acro-yoga to be commercial, "impure" forms, and yet yoga somehow endures.

The point is that more people practicing it isn't going to harm it. I meet people every day who hear I am a (retired) ballet dancer and they say, "Oh yeah, I took ballet when I was 7, at this little neighborhood studio, for a couple summers." Their ballet is vastly different from my ballet. But ballet hasn't died because of it, and the cool part is, at least a lot of people get to experience ballet for a little bit, and have access to serious training if they wish it.

Parkour will end up the same way, with or without competition. Trust me.

I would be thrilled if it did. It would mean we have acceptance from the public at large...

...But I have a few reasons to think it won't happen quite the same way...

For starters, you rarely see someone practising martial arts outside, even rarer still, is to see someone practising ballet in public. You might see yoga, but that will more often than not be in parks or the like.

Skateboarding you would see it everywhere there was a rail or some concrete. And where do we practise?

And look what happened to skateboarding... It's now delegated to parks and specific areas with it being banned (or discouraged) everywhere else.  But all of that only happened when it became mainstream.
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Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #48 on: August 13, 2009, 11:08:51 AM »
I disagree. The banning of skateboarding, and relegating it to restricted areas/parks happened, in a large part, because skateboarding is inherently damaging to the structures on which it happens, for one; and for two, when approached by the authorities in the early days, most skaters responded with a "fight the man" attitude instead of a "work within the man's restrictions to help the man change his thinking about public spaces" attitude. This led to people perceiving, for right or wrong, skaters as "punks" and a "nuisance."

Again, I'm just going with what the public perception is, not with what the reality may or may not be.

Part of why we are so geeked on being respectful to authorities and our training spaces is because we don't want to be relegated to specific parks,etc. We want to be able to train everywhere.

Ultimately what we want is for parkour to be known and accepted by everyone, and to be able to train wherever without causing trouble. Neither of these things will happen if parkour remains "underground."

As to the competition piece of that, well, that's a whole separate thing, so I'm not going to touch on it here.
She followed slowly, taking a long time,
as though there were some obstacle in the way;
and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
--excerpt from Going Blind, Rainer Maria Rilke

www.madisonparkour.com

Offline Trevor

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #49 on: August 13, 2009, 11:14:53 AM »
Muse, I got into parkour because my friend Griffin was talking about it and I asked him about it and he taught me the basics. I trained that for a little but kind of only did jumps and stuff calling it Parkour till around 8 months ago when I found out my best friend used to do it and so we got into it and eventually learned about APK and here I am. You were probably thinking that I got into parkour from Youtube, huh?

Well when I learned about parkour from Griffin it was really underground in Reno. Only a few people did it. It still is underground but more people know about it. They just don't do it. 


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Offline Cameron Scott

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #50 on: August 13, 2009, 11:19:39 AM »
You're right, Spencer. Those examples I gave have been around far longer than parkour. Centuries. But I guarantee that, at the beginning, those early practitioners were wrestling with the same questions we're wrestling with now. In fact, women were not allowed to do ballet in its earliest days, and yet now it's considered a "primarily" women's activity (an imbalance which I find bogus but that's another thread completely). Even now there are some very different branches/approaches to yoga... some yogis view things like acro-yoga to be commercial, "impure" forms, and yet yoga somehow endures.

The point is that more people practicing it isn't going to harm it. I meet people every day who hear I am a (retired) ballet dancer and they say, "Oh yeah, I took ballet when I was 7, at this little neighborhood studio, for a couple summers." Their ballet is vastly different from my ballet. But ballet hasn't died because of it, and the cool part is, at least a lot of people get to experience ballet for a little bit, and have access to serious training if they wish it.

Parkour will end up the same way, with or without competition. Trust me.

I would be thrilled if it did. It would mean we have acceptance from the public at large...

...But I have a few reasons to think it won't happen quite the same way...

For starters, you rarely see someone practising martial arts outside, even rarer still, is to see someone practising ballet in public. You might see yoga, but that will more often than not be in parks or the like.

I think the reason you don't see people practicing in public is that they have places they can go to learn these things from qualified teachers.  I could see that playing out if parkour becomes mainstream and every town with more than 5,000 people has a parkour gym that people can go to for training.  Then perhaps they will do that instead of practicing outside, but we would all still have the same options we have now to train outside on our own.  

[EDIT]In addition, I may be wrong, but people are not inherently restricted in their progression of ballet and martial arts when practicing only inside.  They are still able to train for and perform the vast majority of what their disciplines focus on (attack/defense against opponents and dance performance).  I'm not trying to condense the meaning and art of either down to those basic things, but I believe if being outside was as integral to well-rounded training as it is in parkour you would see many more people doing them outside [/EDIT]

And look what happened to skateboarding... It's now delegated to parks and specific areas with it being banned (or discouraged) everywhere else.  But all of that only happened when it became mainstream.

Well, we don't have specific areas to practice parkour in and except in rare cases it is not explicitly banned anywhere, but reading these forums it sounds like it is discouraged in plenty of places that people try to train.  That's the reason for all the threads on trespassing, dealing with cops, dealing with landowners, etc.  It's not like we're welcomed with open arms everywhere we go.  If it goes mainstream some places that turn a blind eye now to one or two traceurs might balk at always having 10 or more people training there all day every day, but other than that I'd think that the places that allow you to train now will continue to allow you to train in the future.  


I also have the same perception of skateboarding that Muse posted, though I have no more basis than her for my perception. 
« Last Edit: August 13, 2009, 11:25:53 AM by Cameron Scott »

Offline Scared Doggy

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #51 on: August 13, 2009, 11:25:56 AM »
Think about it like this, if it does become mainstream in a couple of years, at least we'll all have a huge head start lol
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Offline Spencer B

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #52 on: August 13, 2009, 11:30:07 AM »
An excellent point Muse. Truly an excellent point.

But it's worrisome because parkour is in a truly unique position... We want to practise it everywhere, and even after learning what it is some people will still think of it as 'skateboarding without the board' and damaging.

Yet it is a discipline through and through... Like a martial art or maybe yoga. we can't tell which direction it's going to go, even if we guide it the best we can. It is simply something too odd and strange to categorize with any of the other things, yet that's what people do; They sort things into neat little categories. I odn't know where it's going, and nobody can say they do, but I hope it does end up being something accepted where we can practise wherever.

And Cameron, that is what I can see as being the best possible outcome for us.
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Offline Alissa J. Bratz

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #53 on: August 13, 2009, 12:53:51 PM »
Muse,  You were probably thinking that I got into parkour from Youtube, huh?


Nope. I had no idea how you got into parkour. That's why I asked. You got into it because someone else told you about it. And that person got into it from somewhere else, and so on.

The point is, if your friend hadn't gotten into it, and told you, you might never have discovered parkour. None of us would have, if it had truly stayed "underground."

Being "underground" does not help parkour at all. If something is underground and uncommon, that leads to a greater chance of it being misunderstood, not the other way around. With a lack of information, people will fill in their own gaps and jump to their own conclusions about what it is; they are more likely to get the wrong idea when they have to arrive at an understanding of parkour in an informational vacuum. More so than if it is out in the open, with lots of people practicing it and talking about it, and seeing it on TV and sharing videos and such.

Case in point: when I first started teaching at my current school, I was the only person there who did parkour. Now I had the choice of keeping it that way or sharing my love of parkour with the community and my students and colleagues. I could have kept it "underground," but instead I told everyone I knew about it; got my colleagues interested, did mini-units on it in my classroom, took the initiative to educate people on what it really is and that it's not just reckless jumping around, etc. As a result, my school has one of the first high school approved parkour clubs in the country, my students who do practice it are careful and respectful, I don't have any parents or anyone freaking out about liability, etc. The other thing is, when some of my students were out on a field trip with another staff member, they wanted to do some parkour on the field trip. This would have been inappropriate, and the other staff member could have said, "No, that's wrong," but instead, he said, "Well, I don't think parkour would be appropriate on this trip but let's look around for at least some cool spots to do parkour, even if we don't do parkour today." And this is a staff member who doesn't do parkour, but at least he knows what it is and is encouraging the kids in their interest.

Imagine how any of the above might have turned out (if it would have happened at all) if I had tried to keep it "underground."

Spencer, you're right about parkour being new and in a unique position. That's why it's so important that we work hard to proactively get the word out about proper training, respectful approaches, etc! We need to be on the front end of that, so we aren't retroactively responding to "No Parkour" signs that go up before we know it. That's precisely the argument against keeping it underground!

:)

She followed slowly, taking a long time,
as though there were some obstacle in the way;
and yet: as though, once it was overcome,
she would be beyond all walking, and would fly.
--excerpt from Going Blind, Rainer Maria Rilke

www.madisonparkour.com

Offline Trevor

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #54 on: August 13, 2009, 03:03:04 PM »
Well Reno is a place that people would get into parkour... But the way some people react here (they over react to the littlest of things) it could be better it stays underground. I don't want it to stay that way but I also don't want people to over react to it and think we are vandals or criminals like they already think of me because I did a wall run... ooh scary wall run. :-Sarcasm


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Offline FastGuppy

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #55 on: August 13, 2009, 03:49:57 PM »
Please correct me if I'm wrong but don't certain forms of martial arts have competition? Aren't they disciplines? Are you saying that as soon as it becomes a competition it looses all forms of art also? Watch the clips from the last Barclaycard. All of them bring a different style, an artistic flare you could say. It's not like they're going to be repeating each others movements, so the creativity is going to be there also.

I've said it several times before, and I'll say it again: the Motion Arts bear crucial resemblance to Martial Arts. I think I'll make a list of similarities.

1: Disciplines, not just sports.

2: Focus on manipulation of the body, not, for example, a ball.

3: Maximum efficiency and effectiveness sought.

4: Method of training - repetition and slow, steady progression.

5: Lifestyles that vary from the norm.

6: Philosophies that go beyond the simple practice.

7: Varying, and sometimes conflicting, branches and concepts. (Ex: Parkour is to Freerunning as Kung Fu is to Wushu).

8: Focus on graceful/powerful/nimble/agile movements.

9: Requires quick reaction and creative thinking.

10: Clearly-defined techniques and strict form, as well as loosely-defined techniques and improvisation. (Ex. I have personally adapted the concepts of Jeet Kune Do in my parkour. Much as Bruce Lee would advise, I learn with strict form and then rid myself of it to become more effective. Others may prefer strict form all the time in their parkour).

11: Different styles of execution. Although this is not yet a manifest phenomenon, I predict that it will be in the near future. Different people naturally have different, idiosyncratic styles of movement. Some may be dynamic and angular, and others may be more fluid and smooth. Think Tae Kwon Do vs. Aikido.

12: Different technical execution. Much as the above, we haven't seen much of this yet, but there likely will be. Some disciplines or schools may favor vaults, while others favor jumps. Some may favor one-handed vaults over two-handed vaults, or cranes over pop-ups. Think Tae Kwon Do vs. Wing Chun - Tae Kwon Do predominantly features kicks and the legs while Wing Chun predominantly features punches and the arms.

13: Not originally intended for competition, but later adapted to it.

14: Trained to sharpen primal skills and abilities already ingrained into the human being.

15: References animals and nature for inspiration.

And there are plenty more similarities; this is just the beginning. If anything, you can expect the future of the Motion Arts to be much like the history of Martial Arts. (By the way, the title, "Motion Arts," I think, is an excellent solution to the 'what should we really call what we do' debate).

I think a lot of the references you made are referring to specific martial arts like shaolin kung fu. While some arts might mimic animals many do not.

In addition, not all arts are graceful. Muay Thai is pretty much a power martial art with strong kicks, blows and a lot of elbows.

There is a certain amount of discipline in ancient martial arts; however, I think they are outdated and altogether overrated .  If discipline is staying with a certain set of rules then you can basically count Jeet Kune Do and parkour out of it. There are hardly any rules to it. Although, Jeet Kune Do and parkour are much more a discipline than other arts considering it builds much more morals and brings forth much more learning imho.
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Offline FastGuppy

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #56 on: August 13, 2009, 04:35:19 PM »
I disagree. The banning of skateboarding, and relegating it to restricted areas/parks happened, in a large part, because skateboarding is inherently damaging to the structures on which it happens, for one; and for two, when approached by the authorities in the early days, most skaters responded with a "fight the man" attitude instead of a "work within the man's restrictions to help the man change his thinking about public spaces" attitude. This led to people perceiving, for right or wrong, skaters as "punks" and a "nuisance."



Ultimately what we want is for parkour to be known and accepted by everyone, and to be able to train wherever without causing trouble. Neither of these things will happen if parkour remains "underground."


Muse, I'm all for making the world a better place, but I’m not at all for parkour becoming mainstream.

Everyone I know that does parkour does it because it’s different and it’s a change of life. We don’t classify as the typical idea of an athlete. To allow parkour to be mainstream would amount to parkour becoming arbitrary. If we are to be arbitrary then we loose all meaning in our movement. Putting it to the man is what parkour is all about. The only way our movement will conform to the outside world is if the outside world conforms to us.

The conventional wisdom of modern freedom is lacking in definition, but parkour is a strong symbol for actual freedom and strength. I see so many people making choices because others do it. They aren’t making a choice they are just a slave. Sequacious behaviors manifested by sequacious practices.  The prevailing attitude of our society is to hold your hand while crossing the street. This philosophy of “living simple” seems to forget the virtues of an esoteric life.

The inherent meaning of parkour will be void where typically applicable if it is allowed to perish into popular culture.
"obsession is a great replacement for talent" -Steve Martin

Offline Cameron Scott

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #57 on: August 13, 2009, 06:44:15 PM »
To allow parkour to be mainstream would amount to parkour becoming arbitrary.
I'm not sure I follow this.  Do you mean that if everyone is doing it then you think most people will be doing an impure form of parkour, and therefore parkour becomes arbitrary? 

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Putting it to the man is what parkour is all about.
Can you expand on that?  I'm all about sticking it to The Man (which I blame for all our social ills :) ) but for me parkour is completely about realizing the physical potential I have as a human being.  It's seeing that I'm capable of far more than I have ever considered possible and seeing how far I can take that.  I don't really see my doing parkour as affecting our social systems other than perhaps inspiring others to attempt to expand their boundaries, which I could see as subversive, but which would also be enhanced by it becoming more popular.

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The inherent meaning of parkour will be void where typically applicable if it is allowed to perish into popular culture.
What is the inherent meaning of parkour for you? 

Offline FastGuppy

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #58 on: August 13, 2009, 09:18:43 PM »
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I'm not sure I follow this.  Do you mean that if everyone is doing it then you think most people will be doing an impure form of parkour, and therefore parkour becomes arbitrary? 



To say parkour's meaning is relative is to say pakour's meaning is arbitrary. If something is mainstream then people do it purely because people are doing it and not because of any meaning. Once Joe sees the new hip thing to do he will want to do it because it is cool, not because it is unique, not because it makes him free. To suggest parkour as mainstream would make the meaning of parkour arbitrary or even absent. 


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Can you expand on that?  I'm all about sticking it to The Man (which I blame for all our social ills :) ) but for me parkour is completely about realizing the physical potential I have as a human being.  It's seeing that I'm capable of far more than I have ever considered possible and seeing how far I can take that.  I don't really see my doing parkour as affecting our social systems other than perhaps inspiring others to attempt to expand their boundaries, which I could see as subversive, but which would also be enhanced by it becoming more popular.


Have you ever watched or read fight club? It’s just like that. And the first two rues of fight club are don’t talk about fight club. “Sticking it to the man” was muse’s words for what skaters are doing.  View it more along the lines of this. It’s being different. I’m sure there are plenty people out there whose parents were strict. You have to become a doctor or you have to follow this religion. Parkour is a great way of being free and it’s a symbol of it. Hell sometimes work just kills you and everything constrains you. Just like fighting in fight club and jeet kune do, parkour is much like a rebellion. It’s an activity. You might say there is no meaning to anything at all but there is, you just don’t fully realize it.  It’s all about being unique and that won’t happen if everyone is trying to be like us, unique.

It happened with rappers, hippies, martial arts, punk rockers and a shit load of others I could name. I know because I’ve been studying this trend. Read the one-dimensional man. I know the author.

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What is the inherent meaning of parkour for you? 




The inherent meaning of parkour and free running to me is free will. It’s what you want to do and not others.

Call me a fruit cake, call me a conspiracy theorist, call me an idiot but if somehow this goes mainstream in the future we will get a bad reputation and you will be looking at me and saying I was right.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2009, 09:25:44 PM by FastGuppy »
"obsession is a great replacement for talent" -Steve Martin

Offline Cameron Scott

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Re: Better as an unknown sport?
« Reply #59 on: August 14, 2009, 06:16:11 AM »
Thanks for the clarifications FastGuppy.  Our thoughts on parkour are different but I think I understand where you're coming from.  All I can say right now is that that's not what parkour is for me, hence my position on this thread.  However, I'll think more about your last post.  I hope that I never have to say you're right on this though.  :P  That would be a sad day.