Author Topic: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"  (Read 24196 times)

Offline Gregg HIPK

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #60 on: October 08, 2009, 08:16:11 PM »
7. Throwing
Throwing consists in projecting an object of any shape or size either to a given distance or toward a given target. This exercise has many uses, for instance when defending oneself by throwing an object, helping someone in the water by throwing a life buoy or a rope, reaching a high place by throwing a grapple, giving a tool to someone you cannot reach, etc.
Throwing exercises act on most of the muscular system, particularly on the arms and the obliques.
They improve coordination, both for the power and the accuracy of the throw, and develop a good eye and a steady hand. They complement well lifting exercises, without any of the dangers of these previous exercises.
Throwing exercises are both educational and applied, and can be performed at any age, provided that the weight of the objects is limited for children. They must be done on both sides, to develop symmetry on the musculature and ambidextery.

Throwing light objects
1. Throwing by swinging of the arm: hold the object in the right hand, arm straight along the body. Split the legs front and
back, the right leg backward and carrying the weight of the body. Swing the arm back and forth, releasing the object when
the arm goes from back to front, while shifting your weight from the back to the front leg, extending the back leg fully and
possibly raising the foot. This method is used commonly in the game of Bocce ball.
2. Throwing by extending the arm: hold the object in the right hand, split legs front and back, weight on the back leg. Bring
the arm flexed toward the back, with a slight torsion of the body to the right. Extend suddenly the arm forward to release the
object, while bringing the weight of the body on the front leg and twisting the body toward the left. The arm follows a semicircular
trajectory, horizontal, slanted or vertical. This method is used to throw a small rock, a ball or a light object at a great
distance.
3. Throwing by torsion of the body: the difference with the previous method is that the object leaves the hand like in a
slingshot. The movement of the entire body produces the throw, not the arm alone which remains straight. Split the legs front
and back, bringing the weight on the back leg. Swing the extended arm front to back horizontally, twisting the torso in the
same direction. Release the object when the arm comes back to the front, with a vigorous torsion of the body to the left and a shift of the weight on the front leg. This method is used to throw ropes and life buoys. It is also used in the classical throw of the disc […].

Throwing heavy or large objects
1. Throwing from the shoulder without moving the feet: hold the object in the right hand, split the legs to bring the right foot back. Bring the right hand to the right shoulder, behind the head, arm bent. Bend the body backward, bringing the weight on the right leg, flexing. Bend immediately forward, shifting the weight onto the front leg and extending the right arm to release the object. The throw is done from the motion of the entire body, not just the arm.
2. Throwing from the shoulder with a step: with the object in the right hand next to the shoulder, step back to bring the weight on the flexed right leg as above. Shuffle both feet forward, keeping the weight on the right leg, and throw the object as previously using the momentum gained in the shuffle.
3. Two-handed throw from the shoulder: bring the object to the shoulder and throw it as previously, but using two hands to
carry the object.
4. Two-handed throw by swinging: take a wider stance, bend down to grasp the object, legs flexed. Swing the object back
and forth between the legs, then release it forward while straightening the body and extending the legs.
5. Two-handed throw by side swinging: stand to face a direction perpendicular to the direction of the throw. Take a wide stance, bend to grasp the object, and swing it side to side, along the throwing direction. Release the object while bringing your weight on the throwing side.

Juggling exercises
The throwing exercises above are complemented by juggling with all sorts of objects. The following exercises can be done in multiple ways: with light objects, heavy objects, without moving, while moving forward, backward or to the side, throwing higher and higher or faster and faster, using only the arms instead of the whole body to throw, keeping the hands always above or below the shoulders,
flexing the legs to throw and catch, flexing the torso forward or to the side to catch and extending it to throw..
Juggling exercises develop dexterity, a good eye and a steady hand. With heavier objects they have an intense effect on the strengthening of the arms, forearms and core muscles. The main juggling exercises are the following:
1. Throwing and catching an object with two hands.
2. Throwing an object with the right hand and catching it with the left. With a heavy object, bending the torso to the side and
catching with the arm fully extended is a great exercise to strengthen obliques, pectorals, and forearms.
3. Throwing and catching an object with one hand.
4. Throwing an object to a friend with both hands. If the object is light enough, the two persons can face each other, if the object is too heavy they must face the same direction and throw sideways. That way, if the object is not caught it will fall to the ground without
hitting the receiver.
5. Throwing and object to a friend and catching it with one hand.

Offline Mazavam

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #61 on: October 28, 2010, 04:58:44 PM »

Offline Gregg HIPK

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #62 on: October 29, 2010, 10:16:18 AM »
Yes, that's the final translation Pilou [mostly] and I did. I'm glad to see it's getting spread around.