Author Topic: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"  (Read 24813 times)

Offline Gregg HIPK

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #20 on: July 25, 2009, 02:59:21 PM »
[THANKS TO BIONICGRAPE FOR RESCANNING BAD PAGES]


FIG 10 CONDUCTING A MASS INSTRUCTION - Groups of children of 8 to 11 years starting the session of work with walking exercises with posture-correcting movements

Rest is needed to put the body in a state to start again. Consider: 1° The local fatigue; 2° General fatigue; 3° Breathlessness.

85. The local fatigue comes from exaggerated work of one part of the muscular system. Reaching a certain degree it produces muscle aches characterized by a certain stiffness in the muscles or a vivid pain during contraction.
  Experience shows that simple aches usually disappear in forty-eight hours, if one cares to rest the tired muscles about this long.
  Properly executed massage reduces the duration of the aches.
  The local ache presents no serious problem; It should be considered as an indication to cease work for a time. It always appears after a new exercise which works muscles that have remained inactive for some time.

86. General fatigue is felt throughout the body. It has three main levels: weariness, overwork and forcing.
  Weariness or light fatigue usually disappears after a meal with appetite, a few hours of sleep or the ordinary night rest.
  Sometimes there is a low-grade fever, insomnia or loss of appetite. In this case, an extra rest will return the body to perfect condition.
  Overwork occurs when one starts the same work again, while already weary. The body has not had the time needed to return to a satisfactory state, and repair its parts.
  Troubles a bit more serious than the fatigue can occur, especially if burnout continues for some time.
  The body becomes impoverished day by day and offers less resistance to disease.
  Forcing or the last degree of fatigue is the result of a final effort of will to perform excessive work, while the body is already in a state of burnout. The muscles are stiff and can no longer obey the action of the will. It generally produces fainting and in some cases the consequences can be fatal.

87. Breathlessness is a special disorder of the circulation and respiration produced by the expenditure of excessive work in a very short time. In this state, breathing is constricted, the heart beats very fast; there can even be choking with complete inability to breathe.
  The lungs are saturated with carbonic acid, which they are unable to eliminate. This occurs especially in racing. The runner suffers choking, a beginning of asphyxiation.
  As soon as the first signs of shortness of breath occur, stop work and restore calm by breathing exercises or walking slowly, preferably on the points of the feet.

88. The rules on alternating work and rest concern the whole day and not only the special time devoted to physical exercises.
  The rest periods should be adjusted so that at each return to work all traces of fatigue have disappeared in the body.
  The general signs one recognizes if one has exceeded the limit of forces are:
  Fever, insomnia or restless sleep, irritation, lack of appetite, digestive disorders, fatigue on awakening, pronounced aches, weakness in the legs, etc..
  The particular signs, during the work itself, indicating that it is time to stop are:
  The general stiffness, trembling limbs, pallor of the face or extreme redness, repeated shortness of breath.

89. After a day of busy work one should feel a very light sense of fatigue that should disappear entirely after a regular night’s rest.
  The general signs that indicate the amount of work is
well-regulated are:
  A good appetite, a deep sleep, a feeling of well-being on awakening and no aches.

90. Each subject has a personal coefficient of resistance.
  One must learn to monitor himself, to know his strength so as not to exceed or wasted in vain.
  The limits of fatigue such as breathlessness are significantly pushed back by training, work habits, regularity of breathing movements, well regulated eating, the dose of well-distributed rest, the appropriate pace of execution of work .
  For the same subject, the resistance differs according to the provisions of the moment. Fasting, vigils, temperature, emotions are the main causes that change it in one direction or another.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2009, 12:54:18 PM by Gregg »

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #21 on: July 29, 2009, 04:50:28 PM »
CHAPTER X
LEADING GROUP INSTRUCTION

Dividing into groups. — Study lessons and real lessons. — General rules about the individual work. — General rules about group or mass work.

91. To educate a large number of subjects at a time, divide them in groups as few as possible (8 to 10 students at most). The students of the same group must be of more or less equal strength.
  Each group is led by an instructor or a sufficiently capable subject.

92. To teach the basic learning exercises, students are placed in each group, beside each other, in one or two rows, at intervals and distances so they can move independently. The layout in staggered rows has the advantage using of less space, and ease to monitor.
  One should often make the students face each other to increase their interest by letting them judge each other.
  For teaching the other exercises, the students are arranged in the most convenient and practical way.

ANOTHER BLURRY SCAN – p 52.[THANKS TO BIONICGRAPE FOR RE-SCANNING]
93. In the training practice, one must distinguish:
1- Study or demonstration lessons
2 – Real lessons.
Study lessons are used at the beginning of the instruction and at all times for improvement of the movements. Their goal is that the student understands the mechanism of the movements and is instilled with the correct execution principles.
The master or instructor gives all the needed explanations and makes a practical demonstration of the movements himself or by a well complying student, having a bare torso.
The real lesson supposes the movements are already known, understood, and correctly done. The master’s exclusive role is to conduct the lesson in a way which will really represent sustained and continuous work.
 
FIG 12 – GROUP WORK OF LIFTING EXERCISES.
A group of adults do the “press” exercise with iron wenches of 20 to 40 kg.

« Last Edit: September 02, 2009, 12:52:53 PM by Gregg »

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #22 on: July 29, 2009, 05:08:34 PM »
You the man!!!
"Be the change you want to see in the world"
 Ghandi

Offline Gregg HIPK

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #23 on: July 31, 2009, 04:14:59 PM »

FIG. 13 - CONDUCTING GROUP INSTRUCTION. - Walking with support of hands as well, walking on all fours.
  This exercise favorably completes the series of support exercises. It is more a utility exercise that lets you move into hiding or to progress more easily on steep slopes and rocks, under undergrowth, etc.

As a result, explanations and comments should be kept to a minimum.
  The general hygienic effect of a lesson is essentially, the care provided in the regulation of the expenditure of work, ie the way it is conducted by the master.
  For example, during a lesson of a total duration of 20 minutes, each student must provide a real work from 20 to 22 minutes.
  Rests should be common, but extremely short (10 to 20 seconds on average).

94. During the study lessons the instruction is largely individual.
  The master successively examines each of the students and corrects their posture in front and especially profile.
  Serious faults are corrected first, then the minor. For example, in the movement: Forward elevation of the leg, the first task of the instructor is take care of body position and not the height at which the leg is elevated.
  The teacher should spend a very short time in each movement, leave to resume again after a few moments, to not tire the attention of his students.
  To assure an active attitude of correction, it is commanded: “Such movement, maintain posture.” Students take the posture and keep it until a new direction of the master.

95. During the real lessons the instruction is collective, made by all the subjects, either in groups, or by bringing together all groups under the command of the master at certain times of the lesson (fig . 9 and 16).
  The group work begins as soon as the movements are executed individually with the highest standards. From this moment it is used almost exclusively. It is up to the individual practice if it is essential to correct the performance of certain movements.
  The group or mass work is useful:
1° To understand at a glance the way movements are understood and done;
2° To give an very precise idea of the speed of travel and obtain a uniform cadence;
3° To stimulate the students and have the least energetic of them make more intense efforts;
4° Finally, to avoid wasting time.


FIG 14: MASS WORK OF THE BASIC EDUCATIONAL EXERCISES.
Balance movement of the leg extended forward, done with the hands on the hips.

96. The teacher must ensure that the group work of the basic educational exercises does not degenerate into a simple sketch of the movement commanded. For that he prolongs the rest time by often ordering "Maintain posture" or "Halt" to verify the correction of the active postures.
  During the basic educational movements, students do not count aloud; they make it their full attention to breathe well.
  Only the teacher gives a loud cadence, it rules the duration of rest time and ables the same by a special count.

97. Execution of the movement takes place in two ways:
  1° By command: The teacher states the motion without having to perform it, by commanding: "This movement, at my command." Students go at the rate of the cadence given aloud by the teacher or without cadence to the command of "Go".
  2° By imitation: The teacher states the motion, then he commands: "This movement, follow me." The students fix their eyes on the master and imitate his movements in a precise and accurate fashion.
  This last way is especially used in the beginning; it avoids any loss of time by eliminating many explanations. It is usually used to do the preliminary exercises and breathing exercises.
  Movements stop at the command: "Halt” or “Stop". When the movement to do has a different starting point than upright posture, the position is taken in advance at the direction of the master.
  At the command of “Halt” or “Stop”, the student always returns to the starting position.
 

FIG 15 – MASS WORK OF UTILITY EXERCISES - Climbing along a wall.

98. All mass education must be based on emulation.
  The master encourages goodwill, make all understand the hygienic and utility importance of the exercises and encourages personal effort as much as possible, especially during the runs and walks (fig 11).
  He occasionally excites pride for the organization by small contests or championships. The classic tests described in Chapter VII can be used for these competitions or the master creates new tests according to the circumstances.

99. In general, the hours reserved for physical exercise are still very limited.
  The great concern of the teacher must be use them well and produce an intense effect. For this goal it must require in a constant fashion:
  1° That the students habitually have a correct attitude [posture?] and a clear appearance (education of the posture).
  2° All the short range movements (100 meters maximum) should be in walking or running fast, without retaining the rank or alignment, so that each student can freely give his own speed (fig. 11 ). This requirement is part of the education of energy; it fights at the oafish fault of speed and makes them lose the slow pace that characterizes them.
  The heaviness of look and movement that comes from that particular state of the nervous system is like sleeping and must wake up, mainly by lively relaxation exercises.
  3° In all important travels (to get to a determined place) do a few minutes of running at a suitable pace which depends on the temperature, loading of the student and clothing that he will wear (education of the strength of resistance by running training).
  4° That the relative requirements for walking and running are strictly observed at all times. (education in how to walk and how to run).
  Movements are generally enough number in the run of a same session or day to not have special sessions for this education.
  5° That the duration of the partial rests between exercises are reduced to an essential minimum;
  6° That during the exercises with equipment, the largest possible number of students exercise at a time. The teacher tells the others, if they are too many, to make a movement without equipment and wait their turn (Fig. 15 and 16).


FIG 16. MASS WORK OF SUSPENSION EXERCISE.
During work with equipment there is an interest that as many students as possible exercise at a time to avoid wasting time.

100. The teacher must have a register in which he writes down the performances of each student in the 12 tests of the sheet-type to record the results and measure the physical fitness (See Chapter VII).
  The performances are taken as accurately as possible at times determined, approximately once per quarter.
  The register of individual records should also include a table summarizing the general results obtained after each new performance. This table can be established following the model below.

Dates                           * Oct 1    *  Feb 1   * Jun 1   *  Sep 30
Total number of students * 50        * 50        * 50       * 50
Aptitude insufficient        * 28        * 12        * 6         * 1
Aptitude sufficient          * 19        * 28        * 27       * 12
Aptitude average           * 3          * 8          * 12       * 23
Aptitude superior           * 0           * 2         * 4          * 9
Aptitude exceptional       * 0           * 0         * 1          * 5
Total number of points
of all the students         * 130        * 280    * 612       * 775.5
Average number            * +2.6       * +5.6   * +12.24  * +15.5
Observations

The calculation of the total number of points is determined by the sum of points for all students without exception.
  The overall average derived from the total number of points gives a sufficiently accurate idea of the general physical value of all the students.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2009, 05:09:28 PM by Gregg »

Offline Gregg HIPK

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #24 on: July 31, 2009, 06:14:24 PM »
CHAPTER XI
ORGANIZATION OF A FIELD FOR THE PRACTICE OF PHYSICAL EXERCISES

General layout of a field for physical exercise. — Equipment needed. — Special emplacements —Economic Organization. — Use of any unprepared land.

101. For physical education of a large number of subjects working at the same time, it is absolutely necessary to have available a suitable field, wisely laid-out and organized (Fig. 17, 18 and 19).

102. No specific form of land is particularly recommended. However, if one has the choice, the simplest form, ie the square or rectangle, is the most practical.

103. The best land is that which consists of clay covered with a layer of light sand or fine gravel.
Sand, especially sea sand, provides a very rapid drying of soil after rain.

104. The dimensions to give the land can not be specified; it depends on the number of subjects to exercise at one time.
In general, all the courses of schools (Fig. 20) or barracks, maneuvering fields, some public places are perfectly usable and convertible into physical exercise grounds.

FIG 17 – The very practical way to have 8 groups of subjects to do mass work and under the orders of a single master, the basic learning exercises as modeled in the 4th part.
(Way used in the School of Marine Riflemen in Lorient.)

The figure represents the portion of open space which, in every complete field is reserved for basic learning exercises, for shadow boxing, for small simple games, etc.
  The groups are divided into two columns, one behind the other. In each group, the subjects are about 2m apart and arranged in staggered rows. The group leader stands close to his group, at the place most suitable for monitoring. The master commands from the top of a special platform, to be seen and heard by all.
  For the suspensions and jumps, the different groups go, at the signal from the master, to their respective bars and jumping pits along the path indicated by arrows. They return as a group to the center, at a new signal of the master. Travel preferably by running fast.

105. Typically, a full field, ie a ground arranged in a way that allows the teaching and practice of all exercises, includes:
1° A circular track for the endurance races;
2° A straight track for speed races;
3° Jumping pits in sufficient numbers for the high, long, and deep jumps;
4° A free space for the big games and mass exercises;

ANOTHER BLURRY SCAN 


FIG 18. Terrain for education of a large number of subjects working at the same time.
  Model permits the exercise at the same time of 200 to 240 subjects divided into 16 groups of 12 to 15 subjects and do all the exercises which make up a complete work session: Basic learning exercises, natural and utility exercises.
  These 16 groups of subjects are divided into 2 groups of 8 each.
  There are 8 sets of equipment and similar emplacements. In each location the provisions are such that there are no inactive subjects in a group, if possible.
  For example, while one division uses free space for the mass work, as well as the race tracks, the other uses the rest of the field, passing successively from one location to another. The timetable of the session is set so that the groups can use all the different kinds of locations.
  The relative layout of the locations or equipment does not matter; it depends entirely on the shape or the size of the land that one has.
  The map at the side can serve as a model to establish the grounds for the less important exercises. For example, by reducing in half the overall dimensions and reducing by 4 the number of locations or devices of every kind one has a suite of grounds to exercise 100 to 120 subjects, etc.



FIG 19 - ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF A COMPLETE GROUND for work at the same time, like the previous example (Fig 18) (The model is the Marine Riflemen of Lorient)
« Last Edit: August 01, 2009, 05:26:58 PM by Gregg »

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #25 on: August 01, 2009, 05:22:46 PM »
I stuck in many of the pictures from the book. In the original, they're stuck in between parts of a sentence. Makes for hard reading. I'll try to go through later and fix the pictures of the training grounds - add captions and explanations.


100 m track  for speed races.
 
FIG 19
…work at the same time as stated in the preceding example (fig. 18).
Marine riflemen of Lorient.)
 
FIG 20
DIAGRAM of A SMALL AREA of 15m x 20m (a school yard, for example) turned into an exercise field.
The above model easily lets two groups of 10 to 15 subjects or or 20 to 30 subjects work at the same time. While one group is using, for example, the free space in the center or the circular track, the other passes successively to different emplacements.
Where space is limited, use as much as possible the resources present on the ground or the neighboring constructions to install the bars for suspension, the ropes and climbing equipment. It is up to the organizer to use ingenuity installing his field in the most convenient, most economical and most practical way to meet the conditions for a complete work session.
The pool is shown as a guideline. It is exceptional to have within reach such an attractive place to practice swimming.


FIG 21
A SCALING OCTAGON made of superimposed platforms.

  5° suspension and climbing devises, which are, in order of importance: bars of any forms, smooth inclined ropes, scaling platforms (Fig. 21) ladders, walls, etc.;
  6° beams or horizontal bars can be placed at varying heights for balance exercises, jumps with support of hands, some climbing exercises and passages of dangerous places;
  7° A track of jumping obstacles of all kinds (Fig. 22);
  8° Objects such as stones, bars, weights, dumbbells, tested bags, etc. for lifting exercises;
  9° A special emplacement and weights of 4 to 20 kg, such as stones, weights, balls, etc. for throwing exercises;
  10° target and lighter items, such as stones, balls, etc. for the exercises of throwing at a determined goal;
  11° Wrestling arenas;
  12° A high place to combat vertigo.

106. The preceding organization is relatively easy to install and does not cost too much. Thus:
  1°and 2° The race tracks require a simple trail, marked as required by pickets.
  3° A jumping pit for the high jump consists of two pickets graduated in centimeter and a rope to indicate the height (Fig. 23).
  A jumping pit for long jump consists of a bed of sand about 6 meters long, 2 meters wide and 20 centimeters thick. The distances are marked on a horizontal traverse placed on one edge of the jumping pit (Fig. 23).
  For deep jumps one uses stepladders, ladders, walls, embankments, etc..
  4° Free space for games and exercises which don’t demand a track.
  5° The suspension apparatus: bars, ropes, etc.. install economically using fixed attachment points such as trees, walls, uprights of all kinds, etc ...
  On the other hand, the attachment points that we have cited can be use for climbing apparatus (fig. 15 and 16).
  6* The beams or horizontal bars which are composed of wooden planks of any shape, preferably round, placed on stands or two earthen berms to 1 meter at least above ground.


FIG 23. MODEL OF A GRADUATED JUMPING PIT for study jumps of height and length.
  7° The jumping track includes ditches, wood barriers or gorse bushes and embankments of earth or stone. It is mainly a question of earthworks.
  8° For the lifting exercises one can use all sorts of heavy objects, such as large stones, iron or cast iron masses, bars, bags filled with sawdust or sand, etc. If one does not want to make the expenditure of barbells, use cast iron wenches [ingots?] or dumbbells.
  9° For throwing weights get stones of all shapes and sizes (weighing from 4 to 20 kg) and have some balls calibrated at 7.25 kg.
  10° For throwing projectiles at a determined goal, make a wood target 1 meter each side or draw a goal on a wall for example.
 

FIG 24. MODEL OF AN ARENA FOR WRESTLING EXERCISE
The soil is covered with a thick bed of tan or sawdust, the edges are formed by pieces of turf.

  11° The wrestling arena is made by spreading a layer of sawdust or tan on the ground (fig. 24).
  12° To combat vertigo, all kinds of buildings, equipment, trees, etc. can be used (Fig. 21, 25 and 26).

107. The amount of emplacements or devices of the same kind to be established on the ground depends on the resources one has, as well as the number of subjects to exercise at the same time.
  In general, in a perfectly organized terrain the  layouts are such that each group of performers has their own complete gym.
  Such an organization allows different groups, under the orders of the same instructor, not only to exercise themselves all at once, but at the same time perform the same exercises, which greatly facilitates the supervision and conduct of work.
  Assuming a total of 50 performers, for example, divided into 5 groups of  10, each group having:
  A jumping pit;
  One or more devices to climb;
  A horizontal beam;
  Weights, bars or stones for lifting;
  A special emplacement for throwing with weights, stones, etc.;
  An arena for wrestling.
  Tracks for racing and jumping obstacles can serve all the groups at the same time.

108. When the dimensions of land we have or the resources available are not sufficient, the installations to make first and which are primary are in the following order of importance:
  1° Jumping pits;
  2° A track for the races;
  3° Apparatus for hanging or climbing.
  All this so you can at least run, jump and climb for a session. Then, objects for lifting and throwing, the arena for wrestling, and so on.

109. A teacher must know to pull part from the first ground come and never be embarrassed to exercise his students.
  With a little ingenuity, any unprepared land, especially: school yard, place, field, prairie, etc. can be immediately transformed into a ground for physical exercise. To this end:
  1* Use discovered spaces for basic learning exercises, boxing, wrestling, the study jumps, the speed and endurance races, the games;
  2* Use trees, walls, columns, traverses, ladders, for the climbing and scaling exercises.
  3* Choose heavy rocks and suitable weights for the lifting and throwing exercises.
  4* Use the ditches and embankments to make the jumps of real obstacles.

110. Finally, on an absolutely bare terrain, it is always possible to do at least the following exercises:
  1* The basic learning exercises (except the suspensions)
  2* The study high and jumps
  3* The speed and endurance races.
  4* Shadow boxing, working in pairs and the assault
  5* The study of the wrestling strikes, or the assault if there is sand or grass
  6* Transport of the injured
  7* Lifting and throwing, for one can always easily find stones for one or the other of these exercises;
  8* The games.

This is the end of the "Study" section. I will update the rest as I soon as I get it...
« Last Edit: October 30, 2009, 12:55:12 PM by Gregg »

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #26 on: August 25, 2009, 03:43:41 PM »
Pilou has finished translations of the throwing and lifting sections. While I'm impatiently waiting for missing pages from Harvard Library, I thought I'd start to slog through the DEFENSE chapters. I think that instead of breaking down all the strikes in mind-numbing detail, I'll only interpret the photo captions?

CHAPTER VIII
DEFENSE EXERCISES

General considerations — Main effects on the body. —Utility of the defense exercises by natural means. —Boxing. — Wrestling — Defense against a dangerous individual.

I. — GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS

553. The art of self defense includes all processes to dispose of or gain control of an adversary, either by natural means, or with instruments or weapons.
  Defense by natural means is the first to know and practice, both because of its usefulness and the excellence and the multiplicity of its effects on the body.
  All the other ways of defense with instruments or weapons such as baton, cane, epee, saber, guns, etc. should be classified as sports.

554. Defense exercises by the natural methods are useful when one is unarmed:
1° To resist an attack;
2° To control a dangerous individual or get rid of him;
3° To come to the aid of someone or protect;
4° To gain respect, etc.

555. The main effects of defense exercises are:
1° They develop the entire muscular system;
2° They increase the strength of resistance;
3° They develop the manly qualities: boldness, courage, coolness, energy;
4° They give assurance and self-confidence;
5° They require calculating, thinking to strike blows with the greatest possible impact;
6° They make one clever and flexible;
7° Lastly they give resistance to blows and pain.

556. The natural defense exercises include:
1° The strikes with fists, feet;
2° Limb or body holds to throw the opponent to the ground;
3° The 'keys' or special holds to immobilize the opponent standing or on the ground.
  Practically, the natural defense exercises can be reduced to boxing and wrestling.

II. BOXING
Usefulness and principle effects of the boxing exercises — Guard position — Direct punches —Punches to the side — Kicking. —Work on mannequin, bag, etc. — Work in pairs. — Assault and combat.

I. — General considerations.
557. Boxing is the art of defending yourself against an opponent or to defeat him, by striking with fists or feet.
This kind of exercise is particularly useful:
1° To keep an individual at a distance;
2° To get rid of an opponent who has seized you;
3° To fight several opponents at once, etc.

558. Boxing exercises are done several ways:
1° Alone by striking nothing;
2° Alone by striking dummies, bags, etc.
3° By working in pairs;
4° In simple assault, without attempting to decide the strongest;
5° In combat to decide the strongest.

559. From the simple educational point of view, boxing is an exercise of the first order.
The different strikes of boxing with fists and kicks, done correctly in the air with full range of motion, produce nearly the same effect as the basic educational movements and have almost all their qualities.
They recall, however, by the outward form they reveal, some educational movements, particularly lunges and balances.

560. The full effects of boxing are:
1° It develops a large part of the muscular system. The kicks in particular have a very intense action on the abdomen muscles.
2° It greatly develops the dexterity, the flexibility, the glance.
3° The work of legs as well as the movements and little jumps that accompany execution of the different strikes, activate breathing and circulation.
4° The different kicks develop a sense of balance.
5° The exercises performed by striking dummies, bags, etc and assaults and fights let one gain speed in the relaxation of the members, quality which can not given enough by striking nothing.
  In effect, in an empty bowl, one must necessarily slow the rate at the end of movement and contract antagonistic muscles to avoid a painful and sometimes even dangerous shock in the joints.
6° Finally, assaults and fights increase the strength of resistance, develop manly qualities and endurance to beatings and pain.


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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #27 on: August 26, 2009, 04:01:21 PM »

Fig 291. Right guard position (left foot and fist forward).


FIG 292. Direct punch with the rear arm - 1. Preparation. — 2. Release of the body.


Fig. 293 – Direct punch with the front arm – 1. Preparation. – 2. Release


FlG. 294. Hook punch of front arm to the right corner of the jaw. - Preparation (left group) and execution of the punch (right group).


FIG. 295. HOOK PUNCH OF THE REAR ARM to the side of the jaw (left group) and the lower ribs (right group).
The hook punches are delivered, like the direct hits, with the knuckle bones at the base of the fingers. The more one closes near, the more one must use at the same time the total mass of the body by a violent twisting of the trunk, augmenting if needed with a lateral lunge or a burst.


Fig. 296. LOW KICK. – From right guard with the right leg; from left guard with the left leg.


FIG. 297. KICK FROM POINT [OF FOOT] TO FACE HEIGHT. - 1. Preparation 2. Release of the leg.


FIG. 298. FLANK KICK TO FACE HEIGHT. — 1. Preparation. – 2. Raising the thigh. The thigh is placed in the direction of the opponent, the toes extended. — 3. Releasing the leg.


FIG 299. SHOOTING KICK OF THE REAR LEG TO FACE HEIGHT.
1. Preparation. —  2. Flexing the leg. The thigh is brought as close as possible to the abdomen; the point of the foot contracted — 3. Releasing the leg.


FIG 300. SHOOTING KICK OF REAR LEG TO SHIN HEIGHT.
1. Preparation. - 2. Flexing the leg, the thigh as close as possible to the abdomen. — 3. Release of the leg.


FIG 301 SHOOTING KICK OF FRONT LEG TO FACE HEIGHT. — 
1. Preparation. Bring the thigh as close as possible to the abdomen, and at the same time, change the guard of the arms. – 2. Release the leg.


FIG 302 STUDY OF HOW TO STRIKE WITH THE FISTS AND FEET.
For punches: canvas bag filled with sawdust.
For kicks: logs hanging at different heights

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #28 on: August 26, 2009, 08:15:42 PM »
So is that how you look when you spar G? }:D
"Be the change you want to see in the world"
 Ghandi

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #29 on: August 27, 2009, 12:13:27 AM »
No. That's how I used to look. Now I'm not as flexible. ;D
I never took boxing. Being able to kick is an added bonus.
[Old style, or is it just a French thing? I spent 5 sec to find out, but didn't.]

Tomorrow is wrestling, I guess. I NEVER looked like those pictures.
I wrestled at 98 & 103#. Heavyweight, yeah? ;D

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #30 on: August 27, 2009, 02:57:00 PM »
Fatty!!
"Be the change you want to see in the world"
 Ghandi

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #31 on: August 27, 2009, 03:52:47 PM »
Sorry - wrestling will be tomorrow. I forgot about the parries and ripostes.


FIG. 303 SPECIAL STUDY OF PUNCH WORK IN PAIRS.
Practical way to strike at full strength, without inconvenience to the recipient.


FIG 304. PARRYING A DIRECT PUNCH WITH THE FRONT ARM.
The left subject parries by an opposition of the left arm and retreating back at the same time.


FIG 305. PARRY OF THE LOW KICK
The low kick is given with the sole of the foot or the inner edge of the boot on the tibia.


FIG 306. PARRYING THE POINT KICK
The point kick is given with the point or sole of the foot, in the upper legs, lower abdomen, chest or face.
The left subject parries by retreating the body back and pushing the leg of the enemy down with his arms.


FIG 307. PARRYING THE FLANK KICK
The flank kick is given with the point of the foot to the side, low ribs, chest or face.


FIG 308. PARRYING THE SHOOTING KICK OF THE REAR OR FRONT LEG at flank or face height. The shooting kick is given with the sole of the foot or the heel to the shin, upper legs, chest or face.


FIG 309. DODGE TO LEFT, DODGE TO RIGHT AND RIPOSTES
  Left group: Against an attack of the rear arm of his opponent, the subject on the right dodges to the left. From this position, he can easily riposte to the head or chest of his opponent with his right fist, or the lower ribs with his left fist.
  Right group: Against an attack of the front arm of his opponent, the subject on the left dodges to the right. From this position he can easily riposte to the lower ribs of his opponent with his right fist, or to the head or chest with his left fist.


FIG 310 – DODGE BACK
For an attack of any kind, lean back or jump back quickly to avoid the blow.


FIG 311 - EXAMPLE OF A HALTING STRIKE
On an attack with the rear arm by the left subject, shoot kick from the rear leg to the chest by the right subject.


FIG 312. EXAMPLES OF PARRIES AND RIPOSTES
Left group: On an attack of the front fist to the head by the right boxer, the left boxer dodges to the right and ripostes by a direct punch of the right fist to the lower ribs.
Right group: On an attack of the rear fist to the head by the boxer on the right, the boxer on the left dodges left and ripostes with a right hook to the side of the jaw.


FIG 313 IN GUARD FOR THE ASSAULT OR COMBAT.
Each of the opponents modify the regular classic guard following his temperament and his abilities.

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #32 on: August 27, 2009, 05:32:19 PM »
VIII - ASSAULT AND COMBAT

594. Assaults and combats occur in two ways:
1 - Complete boxing: kicks and punches
2 - Punches only. This way is preferred over the first, mainly in combat.

595. In an ordinary assault, the opponents attack and strike, not to decide the strongest, but only with the goal to learn to strike correctly, to parry and riposte appropriately. They make these preliminary agreements before attacking.
  In general, the stronger of the two opponents helps the weaker by giving advice during the work.

596. In combat however, adversaries seek to assert their skills and prove their superiority. Various precautions are taken to avoid accidents during the combats:
1 - The adversaries are chosen of roughly equal weight.
2 - They are given special padded gloves and light shoes.
3 - The location of the combat is very clear and limited by ropes if needed. It contains no object that may present danger in case of a fall.
4 - The combat takes place in rounds of 1 to 2 minutes, with a rest of at least 1 minute between each round.
5 - A teacher or instructor leads the combat and announces the winner. He stands near the fighters and watches them closely.
6 - It is forbidden for fighters to:
- Kick during a fistfight.
- Use a fast point kick in complete boxing
- Hit below the belt in a fistfight.
- Hit with an open glove, palm of the hand, wrist or forearm
- Hit with elbow, head, or shoulder
- Hit an opponent on the ground
- Hold the opponent
- Continue to hit when body to body
- Fall without a blow
- Fight in a brutal manner or any other incorrect manner

7 - When a competitor is on the ground, he may rest standing away at a distance. He may not begin fighting until the director's order, when his opponent has left the ground with both hands and has faced him anew.
8 - The director of combat separates the fighters in case of body to body. He stops the meeting as he sees fit, either to avoid an accident, or to reprimand or eliminate a competitor who is boxing unfairly by not observing the requirements above.
9 - Each fighter is always assisted by a comrade who rubs, refreshes and cares for him during the interval times.

597. These are declared defeated in combat:
1 - The competitor who removes himself
2 - The competitor unable to continue fighting after a rest between two rounds
3 - The competitor who fell to the ground and did not get up after a certain number of seconds [decided in advance]
4 - The competitor who constantly remained on the defensive
5 - The competitor who has been constantly dominated by his opponent, either by the repetition of his attacks or the precision of the blows he has struck.

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #33 on: August 28, 2009, 04:29:09 PM »
III. - WRESTLING
General considerations. — Classic flat hand wrestling holds. — Braids of the leg or foot, hooks and holds of the legs in ordinary free wrestling.

I. - General considerations.

598. Wrestling is the art of skillfully using some holds of the limbs or body to unbalance an opponent, overthrow, throw or control.
This kind of exercise is particularly useful:
To get rid of an opponent after one has been seized by him;
To handle a dangerous individual, etc.

599. The main effects of wrestling exercises are:
They develop both muscular strength and power of resistance;
They make one clever and flexible;
They learn to fall down without hurting themselves;
They give courage, boldness, coolness and toughness developed in attack as in defense.

600. Wrestling exercises are done three different ways:
1° In regular work in pairs: study and proper execution of various strikes and their parries;
2° In simple assault, without attempting to decide the strongest;
3 ° In combat, to decide the strongest.

601. The regular study work includes proper execution of the various blows and their parries between opponents alternately filling the role of attacker and attacked.
For this work, opponents decide by mutual agreement the blow they will perform. They only make the necessary effort, either to execute the agreed strike, or to resist by parrying.
When many subjects maneuver under the command of one master or instructor, they are placed in two rows facing each other. The instructor then commands: "This move: 1st row, attack! 2nd row, this parry!” Or “No parry!” Then he repeats the same strike, alternating the rows.

602. In the ordinary assault, opponents wrestle simply with the goal to study the different holds or parries; if needed they make preliminary agreements.

603. In combat, they seek instead to assert their skills and prove their superiority.
  As in boxing, various precautions are taken to avoid accidents during the wrestling combat.
  A teacher or instructor is still leading the meeting which takes place in rounds with a certain number of minutes;
  Opponents are chosen with weight about equal
  The location of the combat is clear, and contains no object that may pose danger in case of fall. Plus it is covered with sawdust, tan, etc. or a carpet or a special mattress.

604. The regular work in pairs and courteous assaults where one takes every precaution possible and where one does not seek to decide the strongest are exercises requiring only moderate exertions. They must be regularly employed.
  Wrestling combat to decide the strongest is an extremely violent exercise.
  Carried to excess, it has all the drawbacks of strength training and can produce the following accidents: overwork of the heart, hernia, muscle tears, etc..
  Furthermore, if self-esteem and desire to win are involved in a reckless manner, some courteous conventions, such as that of accompanying the opponent to the ground, for example, are no longer respected. It is then necessary to fear injury: fractures, bruises, dislocations, etc. as a result of falling over one shoulder, an arm held wrong, etc.
  Children and underdeveloped young people should never engage in combat, but only courteous assault.

605. We must distinguish several kinds of wrestling:
1° Wrestling with the open hand, the most conventional of all, having only simple holds above the waist;
2° Ordinary free wrestling which includes the same plus varieties, but which, while less conventional than flat hand wrestling, ignores the most dangerous or painful strikes;
3° Free wrestling with the minimum possible agreements.

606. Wrestling with the flat hand is generally done with a bare torso. The holds are made from head to waist. The fingers of the hands are held together. Using the legs, either to unbalance the opponent, or to ensure a fall, is not allowed.
  All the dangerous or painful strikes are prohibited and in particular:
  Chokes, the maintained and forced tightening of the neck;
  Reversals and twists of the arms and hands;
  Twisting of the neck;
  The crushing of the cervical vertebrae or forcing the head to the chest.

607. Different varieties of free wrestling are done all clothed or with special very resistant clothing: jacket or shirt of heavy canvas.
  It is permitted to seize, depending on the mode of wrestling, all or part of clothing.
  The use of the legs is permitted, either to unbalance the opponent, or to guard against a fall.
  To avoid accidents it is essential that the opponents agree in advance the conventions to be respected during the course of the assault or combat.

608. In the flat hand wrestling or ordinary free wrestling, the opponent is considered "fallen",  defeated, when both shoulders simultaneously touch the ground. The opponent must be escorted to the ground and not thrown or plated brutally, and that in order to avoid a dangerous fall.
  In free wrestling with the minimum possible conventions, the opponent admits his defeat either by sign, or voice when he can no longer resist or when it is caught in a "key".

609. The flat hand wrestling and ordinary free wrestling, either simply with leg loops, or with loops and leg holds at the same time, are the two modes of wrestling to be used in preference.
  Free wrestling with the minimum possible agreements should only be performed in regular study work or simple assaults, opponents taking the utmost precautions to always avoid an accident to be feared with the dangerous holds.
  This last kind of wrestling is the image of real combat, either to defend one’s life or to control a dangerous individual.

610. The methodical training with wrestling exercises is:
1° Start by learning the regular work of blows and parries of the flat hand wrestling;
2° Then make a flat hand wrestling assault;
3° When one has enough first kind of wrestling, learn the blows and parries of ordinary free wrestling
4° Make assault in ordinary free wrestling, first by simply adding the leg passes, then the leg holds to the strikes of ordinary flat hand wrestling;
5° Finally, learn the dangerous blows and their parries, but not to assault and using these last blows between experienced adversaries.

II. – Classic holds of flat hand wrestling.

611. All the holds following are described simply for the side of the body where, usually, they are done the most commonly.
In regular study work, they should be done symmetrically on both sides of the body.


FIG 314. FLAT HAND WRESTLING – GUARD POSITION.


FIG. 315 - FRONT WAIST HOLD -1. Encircle the opponent at the waist with one’s arms. – 2. Lift from the ground and swing to move his upper body to the left.


FIG 316 FRONT WAIST HOLD (continued) – 1. Place the left knee on the ground and rest the back of the opponent on the right thigh. — 2. Free the right leg and let the opponent drop on both shoulders without releasing the hold.


FIG 317. – PARRY OF THE FRONT WAIST HOLD - Push the opponent by placing the forearm on his throat and seizing ones wrist with the free hand.


FIG 318 – SIDE WAIST HOLD – 1 Stand on the right side of the opponent, encircling the waist. — 2. Lift him, swinging him to meet the ground as in the earlier front waist hold.


FIG 319. CROSSED SIDE WAIST HOLD — 1. Encircle the opponent on the right side, by passing the left arm in front of his body and right arm at the rear. — 2. Lift and bring him to the ground like for the front waist hold.


FIG 320 REAR WAIST HOLD - 1. Encircle the opponent’s waist from behind with the arms. – 2. Lift from the ground, engage the right arm under his right armpit and put the right hand over the neck.


FIG 321. REAR WAIST HOLD (continued). — 1. Fall on the left knee and lay the opponent back on the right thigh. — 2. Drop him on the shoulders by freeing the right leg.

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #34 on: August 29, 2009, 03:13:24 PM »

FIG 322. TWO WAYS TO PARRY A REAR WAIST HOLD. – 1. Lunge deeply forward and push the opponent by seizing the arms above the elbows. – 2. Arching the lower back, extend the trunk and head back and surround the opponent's arms.


FIG 323. BACKWARDS WAIST HOLD. - Seize the opponent and load him on the right shoulder.


FIG 324. BACKWARDS WAIST HOLD (continued). — The opponent being raised above the ground, drop abruptly forward by putting the knees on the ground.


FIG 325 PARRY OF THE BACKWARDS WAIST HOLD. -  Drop back to fall flat on the back, causing the opponent to make a complete somersault.


FIG 326. HIP TURN WITH HEAD – 1. Circle the neck of the opponent with the right arm and at the same time seize his right arm above the elbow with the left hand. — 2. Kneel suddenly to carry along the opponent.


FIG 327 – HIP TURN WITH WAIST. – 1. Seize the opponent at the waist by surrounding it with the right arm and at the same time seize his right arm above the elbow with the left hand. — 2. Kneel suddenly to carry along the opponent.


FIG 328. PARRY OF THE HIP TURN WITH HEAD OR WAIST. -  Lunge forward, pushing the opponent with the free arm and resist the forward carry by pulling back strongly.


FIG 329 ARM TURN. – 1. Seize the opponent’s left arm with the right hand and the left hand above the elbow, and engage him over the left shoulder. – 2. Kneel suddenly to carry along the opponent. 


FIG 330. ARM ROLL ON TOP – 1.  Seize the left arm of the opponent with both hands above the elbow and engage him with the left armpit. 2. Kneel suddenly to carry along the opponent.


FIG 331 – PARRY OF THE ARM TURN AND ROLL – Lunge forward, pushing the opponent with the free arm, and resist the forward carry by pulling back strongly.


FIG 332. – ARM ROLL UNDERNEATH. - 1. Pass the head and the left arm under the opponent’s right armpit. With the left arm strongly hug his right arm under the left armpit. — 2. Strongly encircle the opponent’s right arm under the left armpit (Waist hold parry in reverse).


FIG 333. HEAD TURN — 1. Seize the opponent's neck from below with the right arm and put the left hand on the nape of the neck. — 2. Kneel suddenly to throw the opponent forward.


FIG 334 – PARRY OF THE HEAD TURN – 1 Make a “bridge”, strongly arch the lower back while somersaulting to keep the shoulders from touching ground. – 2. Lunge forward as much as possible bringing one knee to the ground, and push the opponent with one of the free hands.


FIG 335. – BRIDGE OR DOUBLE BRIDGE  (another parry of the head turn). —  Make a “bridge”, strongly arch the lower back while somersaulting to keep the shoulders from touching ground.
The wrestler who does the head turn can try to topple his opponent by himself making the bridge. The wrestlers are then in a "double bridge". One of the wrestlers who made the bridge to parry a head turn, his opponent may try to overturn it by a bridge over him.


FIG 336. – SHOULDER TURN - 1. Seize the left arm of the opponent with the right hand above the elbow, and engage the left arm under the right armpit. – 2. Force the opponent to his knees and turn him over towards the right.


FIG. 337 EXAMPLES OF GROUND STRIKES.
Left group: The kneeling subject tries to take his opponent in a rear waist hold. The latter parries by completing a flat stomach.
Right group: The subject in back passes his right arm under the right arm of his opponent and puts his right hand on the nape of the neck.
With the left hand he seizes the oponent’s left arm. By pulling the left arm towards him, and lifting with the right arm, he tries to turn his opponent onto both his shoulders.


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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #35 on: August 31, 2009, 12:17:11 PM »
III. — Locks of the leg or foot, hooks and holds of the legs in ordinary free wrestling.

638. Ordinary free wrestling usually consists of the strikes of the flat hand wrestling, to which are combined or added all positions and holds possible with the legs.
  In the free wrestling the leg work is primarily intended to throw the opponent to the ground in a single blow or using the mass of one’s body to unbalance him to overturn him more easily.

639. To unbalance an opponent or throw him to the ground in a single blow, either by a lock of leg or foot, or by a leg hold, it is essential that all the body weight of the opponent rests on the leg we want to move or seize.
  If this condition is not met, lifting or moving the leg doesn’t produce any real loss of balance.
  To parry the locks and leg holds, quickly move the body weight from one leg to another.

640. Locks of the leg or foot from the outside are the most effective strikes.
  Holding the legs with the hands are in general impractical, especially in front, as they call too easily for a reposte by the opponent of a reverse waist hold.
  (') Breton wrestling, highly honored in the Bretagne countryside, is a kind of free wrestling where the leg hooks called “jambettes” play a very large role. Leg holds with the hands are never used, and are even prohibited in competitions. The adversaries hook the clothing from head to belt, including the belt.

641. With an opponent who wears clothes, the best hand holds are: One hand on each shoulder (Fig. 338); both hands at the same shoulder; a hand to the elbow and the other at the shoulder (Fig. 343); a hand to the neck or collar, the other at the elbow.


FIG 338. - PRACTICAL COSTUME FOR WORK IN FREE WRESTLING: Pants and jacket of heavy canvas.
  Example of a hand hold on the clothing, at the shoulder (Breton wrestling).
  Higher holds are the best to unbalance the opponent.


FIG 339. – OUTSIDE LEG HOOK
  Left group: The subject on the the right, having seized his opponent with a turn of hip and head tries to throw him by passing the right leg from outside.
  Right group: The left subject, having secured a hold on his opponent’s clothing, tries to knock him off balance over the left leg passed outside.


FIG 340 OUTSIDE FOOT HOOK.
  Left group: the left subject, having seized his opponent’s clothes, abruptly sweeps the opponent’s left foot from outside to inside with the inner part of his right foot.
  Right group: the left subject puts his heel behind and against the left heel of his opponent and suddenly pushes back with a single arm.


FIG 341. INSIDE LEG AND FOOT HOOKS
  Left group: the left subject, having seized his opponent by a front waist hold, tries to knock him down by passing the right leg inside.
  Right group: the left subject, having secured a hold on his opponent’s clothes, seeks to knock him down by passing the right foot on the inside.


FIG 342 – EXAMPLE OF A OUTSIDE AND INSIDE HOOK.
  Left group: the subject on the right, having seized his opponent with a hip and head turn, seeks to knock him down by making an outside hook with the right leg.
  Right group: the left subject, having secured a hold on his opponent’s clothes, tries to knock him down backwards by making an inside hook with the right leg.


FIG 343 -  FRONT HOOK WITH HAND HOLDS AT THE SHOULDER AND ELBOW, one arm around the neck.


FIG 344. FRONT HOOK WITH HAND HOLDS AT THE BELT AND ELBOW.


FIG 345. EXAMPLES OF LEG HOLDS.
  Left group: The left subject, having been seized by a hip and head turn, ripostes with a one hand leg hold.
  Right group: The left subject, having been seized by a reverse waist hold, ripostes with a two hand leg hold.


FIG 346. EXAMPLES OF HOLDING BOTH LEGS AT THE SAME TIME
  Left group: the left subject seizes the two legs of his opponent below the knees by crouching down as much as possible and resting his head outside the legs.
  Right group: the left subject also captures the two legs of his opponent, but as he did not crouch, his opponent riposted immediately with a reverse waist hold.


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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #36 on: August 31, 2009, 02:09:59 PM »
IV. — DEFENSE AGAINST A DANGEROUS INDIVIDUAL - WAYS TO MANAGE OR REDUCE HIM TO POWERLESSNESS

647. There are two cases to consider depending on the matter:
1° Getting rid of an individual when one was seized by him
2° Master an individual to prevent harm, drive back, stop or expel him.

648. In the first case, break his hold by:
Boxing punches or kicks;
Wrestling strikes or parries.

649. In the second case, as a general rule, avoid approaching the individual head on. Approach from the side or preferably from behind. Seize him immediately, either with a wrestling hold already described, or one of ways indicated below.
  Act with the highest possible speed and seek to make a "key", to hold the individual, so that any attempt at resistance on his part is impossible.

650. Regarding the kind of hold to make, everything depends on circumstances. The hold that is good on a weak subject will be completely ineffective if applied to a strong individual or one who knows self defense.
  All the "keys" can be done in any position: standing, kneeling, squatting or on the ground. Certain “keys” are dangerous, proceed with caution when doing them.


FIG 347. – DEFENSE AGAINST A DANGEROUS INDIVIDUAL. – Encircle the individual from front or back by wrapping him with both arms at the same time.


FIG 348. REDUCE A DANGEROUS INDIVIDUAL TO POWERLESSNESS: How to make a “choke”. – Circle the neck of the individual with the right arm to master him from in front, the side, or preferably in back. Seize your own right wrist with your left hand and squeeze strongly.


FIG 349. – REDUCE A DANGEROUS INDIVIDUAL TO POWERLESSNESS – Seize the arms of the individual to master from behind and keep the elbows as close as possible to each other, encircling them with the arms if needed.


FIG 350. – DEFENSE AGAINST A DANGEROUS INDIVIDUAL
Left group: Inside arm twist. — Right group: Twist and reversal of an arm behind the back and bringing the wrist as high as possible.


FIG 351 – HOW TO REDUCE A DANGEROUS INDIVIDUAL TO POWERLESSNESS:  Conducted by two – Seize the wrist and elbow of the individual to master and turn the arms outside or inside. Maintain distance by being careful to always stay to the side, facing the same direction as him.


FIG 352 – HOW TO REDUCE A DANGEROUS INDIVIDUAL TO POWERLESSNESS: Arm lever.
  Left group: The left subject turned over to the outside the right arm of his opponent and forces the articulation of the elbow using his own left arm as the fulcrum.
  Right group: The kneeling subject turned over and outside the right arm of his opponent and forces the articulation of the elbow using his own right knee as the fulcrum.


FIG 353 - HOW TO REDUCE A DANGEROUS INDIVIDUAL TO POWERLESSNESS: Mechanical forcing of a joint.
  Left group: forcing the elbow joint. — Right group: forcing the ankle joint.
  For all the forcings, the way to imprison the joint is always the same.

Note: The two preceding "keys" [arm lever and forcing a joint], especially the latter, are the most effective of all. When the hold is well assured, the individual is reduced to complete powerlessness, and is incapable to make any movement.
  In the case of legitimate defense or the capture of a dangerous individual endowed with exceptional strength, do not hesitate to use all the dangerous blows banned in courteous wrestling, but part of the art of self defense:
  Kicks and punches, elbows, knees, hitting with the edge of the open hand, in the most sensitive parts of the body: temples, nose, eyes, chin, Adam's apple, neck, stomach, lower abdomen, knee cap, shin, etc;
  Head butts to the face, chest and abdomen;
  Twists and turns of members, twisting fingers, twisting the head, lengthening of the cervical vertebrae, twisting ears and nose;
  Ties, chokes, throat holds, etc.
 

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #37 on: August 31, 2009, 02:43:18 PM »
Elijah/ Bionicgrape sent me the pages that were messed up/ missing from the Google scan. To make it easier reading, I will insert the new information where it belongs in the book, and make a note here so you all know what's been added.

[pages 10 and 11 of the foreword are now done, so the foreword is now complete, in all its awkward glory. :P ]
« Last Edit: December 04, 2009, 10:07:49 AM by Gregg »

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #38 on: September 01, 2009, 02:45:28 PM »
Just did pages 23-29, which has the short form of the test chart, and a sample of a 4 person "fiche-type"
My big apologies = we had the test chart over at HIpk in April 2009. When I copied the thread over, I missed copying the chart.

The test chart HERE is the complete one, from -5 to +15. It's the one I use.

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Re: Hebert's "Practical Guide to Physical Education"
« Reply #39 on: September 02, 2009, 01:18:28 PM »
Finished the Expose... there are still a couple missing pages, and a couple photos I didn't copy. I apologize for the rough translation work. When I started, I translated as fast as I could to get the info out for Ozzi, Shiloh and the other guys at HIpk.

Now that I go back over those early chapters, I cringe at some of my work. Oh well...

Time to check in with Pilou... I may try to do the captions for the "Games, Sports, Manual Labor" or "Swimming" chapters. "Swimming" is really large - tons of photos. Urg.