Author Topic: Blue Ridge Outdoors article  (Read 2348 times)

Offline Gregg HIPK

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Blue Ridge Outdoors article
« on: July 09, 2009, 05:34:28 PM »
I havent read this yet but I figure I post it here anyway.

http://www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/index.php/natural-fitness-wild-workouts-with-the-world%E2%80%99s-fittest-man/

[fixed the link]

I think this is a good approach as we're learning more about MN, MovNat, etc...

"The first rule of survival is to avoid trauma. You never want to be hurt. So you progress gradually. You explore first. That’s the most important element. Exploration. But train in this way and you will progress. You will become strong. Not strong as in big guns, but strong as in fit. You will be prepared for whatever may come."

Offline Gregg HIPK

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Re: Blue Ridge Outdoors article
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2009, 05:36:13 PM »
Some of his comments:

Samson, you are right, every valuable additional content deserve a newsletter, we’ll make sure one is sent systematically. But in any case the content is still there and accessible for you to catch up ;-).

Josh, forget about muscles if you want to fully understand the MovNat approach. Graham Averill who wrote the article made the same “mistake” when he goes “I don’t want to miss a muscle group”.
You don’t target body parts in MovNat but only have one focus: how you move and perform.
What happens to your muscles is not a finality, but merely the outcome of your action and nothing more.
What you seem to be tired of in your sport is not only that it is always the same muscles that you stress, but that you always stress them the same way since your movement patterns are always the same. Give your legs new movement patterns and new types of efforts and they will be happy again.
It is very likely that your body and mind are unhappy because of a very narrowed physical expression due to your specialized objectives and all the downsides that stem from such an approach.
Give your body and mind the primal variety of movements and efforts they are designed to deal with and that they are probably craving for and you will radically change your own experience of exercising.

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Chad, the seminar(s) I intend to hold in the USA in the late summer will be held in West Virginia. I guess it is close enough from where you are right?

Matt, moving on all fours, and all variations of movement in close contact with the ground, is extremely natural to human beings. You still lack of situational mindset, an essential aspect of the MovNat philosophy. Think real-world situations where you could have to move on all fours: a riot, getting to the ground and trying to reach safety, hiding behind a low wall while moving forward or backward, crawling under any low obstacle, moving through a narrow tunnel, approaching animals, that it is stalking or hunting, climbing up an inclined branch on a tree so lower your center of gravity and be able to hook it if you get off-balance, climbing up a steep and slippery slope, climbing down the same slope, having to ensure you don’t slide down in an uncontrolled manner, etc…
Not natural to humans? Not natural to Zoo humans indeeds, but very natural to any human still living in nature or suddenly having to face challenging or threatening situations.
Think situations, you will understand what MovNat is truly about. That’s what you prepare for, practical, real-world circumstances.

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Hi Chris

I will provide some basic training tips later this month.
But I am legitimately keeping 95% of my work for my book (”MovNat, the Philosophy and Practice of Natural Movement”), that will unfold my whole approach and training method.

If you come to one of my seminars, they cover a lot and after such an event you become self-reliant and can actually practice MovNat on a very solid basis.

Thanks for the positive feedback.

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I like to say “show me how well you move and I will tell you how fit you are.”
Of course, I am not talking about salsa or tango.
So it is movement, natural movement and how practical and adaptive it is that tells me how skillful is an individual, while their body shape can be a deceptive indication. Big guns? Big chest? 6 packs? So what? Show me that in action!?
Bulky muscles can be just a dumb hypertrophy of fibers…to be useful, they need to be smart and to make them smart you need to train optimum movement patterns to create the right neuro-muscular connections.
That process doesn’t happen when working out in muscle isolation, but when you move the body as whole.
Again, you don’t train your muscles so you develop the skills. In MovNat, you train skills so you develop skills. Any physical or physiological change in your body is a necessary adaptation, not a finality. It is not about growing muscles. Muscles may grow as an outcome, no more.

To answer your question Bill, how often people train all depends on their own possibilities or objectives. But with MovNat it is indeed possible to train 5 minutes here, 5 minutes there, or 15 minutes of high intensity, when lacking time. It is very adaptable to people’s own schedule.

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Ryan, not as much information as you seem to think, and there is also in my opinion a lot of confusion when it comes to natural movement, is it bodyweight exercises exclusively, is it lifting logs and stones not metal bars, is it fitness drills in the woods, is it yoga…natural movement could be a ragbag accumulating all sorts of conventional, context-free movements seen as “natural”.
Of course, I will talk about specific natural movementS and their techniques, but above all I will unfold my perspective of natural movement as a whole approach, the overall philosophy and practice of natural movement that I call MovNat, and the Natural Movement Training System that goes with it.

As regarding diets, well I am very bored with “diets”, I do not follow any, I simply feed my body with natural food, I mean to specify “natural” since there is more edible junk easily available in our society than actual natural food. When I say food (should be needless to add “natural” actually), I mean natural one, as found in nature, fruits, vegetables, nuts, eggs, seafood, fish or meat that I tend to eat mostly raw while avoiding food products, i.e processed food that doesn’t look like what you find in nature, and totally excluding edible junk. Simple.
I am not going for more complication and sophistication than that when it comes to alimentation and leave it to either people passionate about the subject, people which fragile health truly depends on a finely-tuned diet and last for the kind of self-absorbed people with control-freak tendencies  :D.