Author Topic: changes in parkour  (Read 4384 times)

Offline Eli Kurtz

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Re: changes in parkour
« Reply #20 on: December 17, 2008, 10:02:23 PM »
Yeah, that makes sense.  It kind of goes along with a phrase that floats around the "Consumer Whores" thread: the shoe doesn't make the traceur, the traceur makes the shoe.  One of the ideas behind it is that you'll be a better traceur practicing with worse shoes, because then you don't have the "crutch" of really great footwear.

I like your point.  I'm still going to go on strength training  :P, but if I wasn't in the middle of it and enjoying it so much then I'd probably move away from it.

Offline lostcause

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Re: changes in parkour
« Reply #21 on: December 18, 2008, 01:14:40 AM »
Skill is really important no one can deny that. But strength training and conditioning are important for safety reasons:

http://parkourelements.com/safety/55/ankle-sprains-and-strains

The stronger your body is the less likely you are to hurt yourself. Of course, like everything else in parkour this should be done within reason. But conditioning is really important if you want to continue doing parkour safely.

Offline Eli Kurtz

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Re: changes in parkour
« Reply #22 on: December 18, 2008, 10:41:55 AM »
I'd be interested to hear M2's opinion on all of this.  After all, he's got the only gym in the country that officially combines parkour with strength training (CrossFit).  I'm sure he'd have some good insights.

Offline Eli Kurtz

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Re: changes in parkour
« Reply #23 on: December 18, 2008, 03:28:14 PM »
Care to share?  ???

Offline KC Parsons

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Re: changes in parkour
« Reply #24 on: December 18, 2008, 05:44:48 PM »
Because, from what I've seen, parkour has evolved to be about improving your own biomechanical movement to be more efficient, whether that's perfect to save someone in a 'real parkour situation' or not.

Because, from what I've seen, it's become a more intense discipline based on training in many different ways, not just running through set spots trying to find the perfectly efficient way.

Because, from what I've seen, it's evolved into a lifestyle, mentality, and culture far more than solely a prime-of-life hobby.

These are the changes that I think are for the better

There have been some negative issues, too.
From what I've seen, some people are doing it to impress, progressing from one "trick" to the next, rather than just purely improving their movement.

From what I've seen, there is too muich technical training.

From what I've seen, there is too much impact, too much explosive movement. It has its place but it's not good in excess.


Aside from those plights, though, I feel parkour is headed in the right direction and I'm lucky to have found it, and proud to call myself a traceur.
:)

Offline Spark710

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Re: changes in parkour
« Reply #25 on: December 18, 2008, 06:12:59 PM »
This is a response to the 'To condition or not to condition'.  I may post a response to the original topic later.

In my opinion, the best way to improve in something is to practice it.  Over and over and over and over.  I'm sure you've all heard the quote: "A good traceur practices until he gets a move right, a great traceur practices until he can't get it wrong."  I think high reps (think hundreds) on simple movements is key.  Not only will this put you in good shape (if you're striving for perfect technique) but it has a key advantage over plain conditioning: muscle memory.  This A. improves confidence since you've done a move thousands of times, B. improves the specific muscles you use to execute the move, and C. cements proper technique into your head.

That being said, if it works for me, why does it have to work for you?  Weight training, conditioning, tag, and reps are all perfectly valid choices.  There's not one body type for parkour, no more than there's a right path to choose.  So why should there be a routine that works for everyone?
What is fitness without finesse?
What is power without precision?

99% right is still 100% wrong.

Offline KC Parsons

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Re: changes in parkour
« Reply #26 on: December 18, 2008, 07:40:31 PM »
Meh. Turning technical training into conditioning is not usually the best choice. It's far more likely that one will choose to do a set number of precisions, vaults, or cats. Not really a good call. For the most part, you don't need to do them that many times in one session. They will still become neuromuscularly engrained into you through doing them a lot over the course of time and different sessions. The problem with all at once is the impact. Too much unneeded stress. If you're going to do that, choose different movements. Top outs are good.  A big strength element, along with power, and full body coordination. Much lower impact and still has an amazing practical use. Rail QM or QM can be turned into an endurance workout by doing it for longer durations, I recommend that.
Shuffling in a cat hang can be useful, too. Perhaps a combination if these things.

Just keep a cardinal rule that if you'rte going to take this route, make it lower impact movements, and do the high impact ones more sparingly.