Author Topic: Teaching Tips? (Expert help desired)  (Read 13045 times)

Offline Chad Zwadlo (Zwadloc)

  • Hirundo Rustica
  • *****
  • Posts: 601
  • Karma: +41/-6
    • View Profile
    • Fight or Flight Academy
Re: Teaching Tips? (Expert help desired)
« Reply #20 on: February 23, 2011, 10:06:35 AM »
I've been teaching a very successful program at a gymnastics school in Minnesota for over 2 years now and I have a ton of info and notes on how to teach classes and what work and what doesn't work.  I also have a 30 page document talking about teaching freerunning, breaking down how to teach basic skills, lists of beginning/intermediate/advanced skills, different philosophies, and a 12 week class syllabus.  For a long time I considered selling this as a package to gymnastics schools wanting to start a freerunning program (makes lots of money at my school :P, and similar gymnastics curriculum starters sell to gyms for upwards of $10,000) but I've decided now that I'd rather give it all away to people who really want to start teaching in their area to help them get started.  It's not really something that should be followed exactly to the letter, but it's a great starting point for people to get some ideas from.  I've already helped a few friends in nearby states start their own programs and it's seemed to help them a lot.  If anyone is interested in this info just send me a pm with your e-mail address and I'll e-mail the whole thing to you and answer any questions you may have about it.  I only ask that you don't turn around and try to sell it after I've given it to you.

Offline OPSLORUNNER

  • Oryctolagus Cuniculus
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Teaching Tips? (Expert help desired)
« Reply #21 on: March 17, 2011, 11:53:29 PM »
I get babies every week (some realy are) and have found that shortish sessions of 1-1.5 hours are usualy about all they can handly. Keep the new coming while perfecting the basics, slow progression prevents needless injury. My beginners classes go something like this:

1. 10-15min stretching
2. 5-10min skills recaps (rolls, jumps, landings, catches, climbs) 1 or 2 per day
3. 15-20min basics vaulting and flow training
4. 15-20min new skills
5. Conditioning 15-30min if you are training near daily focus on one muscle group each day, get creative, try slow movement q.M. And low held pushup vareations, they are not hard but go long enough and you will most definately feel the burn.

When it comes to strength training i encourage body weight training only. Increase weight by adding momentum. Presission catches & handstand vareations. Remember in acrobatics bulk muscle is waisted weight.

Good luck teaching is not easy. Remember fear is our biggest roadblock and our best safeguard.

GOOD LUCK TEACHING IS NOT EASY.  REMEMBER FEAR IS OUR BIGGEST ROADBLOCK AND OUR BEST SAFEGUARD.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2011, 05:30:35 AM by Alec Furtado »
FREERUNNING TILL OLD AGE

Offline Tom Coppola

  • Hirundo Rustica
  • *****
  • Posts: 583
  • Karma: +73/-14
  • TomewardBound
    • View Profile
    • Florida Parkour
Re: Teaching Tips? (Expert help desired)
« Reply #22 on: March 18, 2011, 12:32:25 AM »
WHEN IT COMES TO STRENGTH TRAINING I ENCOURAGE BODY WEIGHT TRAINING ONLY.  INCREASE WEIGHT BY ADDING MOMENTUM.  PRESISSION CATCHES & HANDSTAND VAREATIONS.  REMEMBER IN ACROBATICS BULK MUSCLE IS WAISTED WEIGHT.

This is misinformation.  Weight training will not add any extra bulk on its own.  In order to gain weight you have to take in a caloric excess, which means your weight is dictated by what and how much you eat.  You can also bulk up by strictly using body weight strength skills.  Look at this bulky gymnast.

Extra bulk is not wasted weight.  The larger your muscles the more force you can produce.  Do you see any sprinters with little muscle mass?  No, they're generally very muscular and they can produce a ton of force.  Parkour is primarily a running/jumping sport.  The best way to develop strength for force production and force absorption specific to running, jumping and landing, is to use traditional barbell exercises i.e. squat and deadlift.

Body weight strength skills are more effective for upper body strength development.

For more information on training visit Eat. Move. Improve. 

Also, please stop yelling.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kfGJ-vaW0Uw

When faced with the stress of a life-threatening engagement, we don't rise to the occasion, we descend to our level of training.

Offline OPSLORUNNER

  • Oryctolagus Cuniculus
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Teaching Tips? (Expert help desired)
« Reply #23 on: March 21, 2011, 10:13:13 PM »
You are quite correct that diet contributes heavily to the building of bulk muscle.  The unfortunate side effect of weight training is that the movements are not allowing a natural ballance the body trys to maintain contributing to unbalanced quordination.  In addition, unbalanced weight training by unexperienced lifters can create a multitude of problems.  remember we are talking about training newbees, they are far less likely to have strength building problems pushing their own weight only.  Once a person reaches a fairly healthy state of fitness weight lifting will be more usefull.

but that's just my opinion, as long as everyone is having fun and being safe who cares?
Then again the majority of my students are under 18 and have little physical capability.  I have seen great fitness turnaround with the out of shape and over weight kids as well as confidence building for the timid.

sorry for the caps
FREERUNNING TILL OLD AGE

Offline aerosfcity

  • Oryctolagus Cuniculus
  • *
  • Posts: 36
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Demo.
    • View Profile
    • Parkour Connections
Re: Teaching Tips? (Expert help desired)
« Reply #24 on: September 30, 2011, 05:44:55 PM »
I've been teaching a very successful program at a gymnastics school in Minnesota for over 2 years now and I have a ton of info and notes on how to teach classes and what work and what doesn't work.  I also have a 30 page document talking about teaching freerunning, breaking down how to teach basic skills, lists of beginning/intermediate/advanced skills, different philosophies, and a 12 week class syllabus.

I imagine this has probably changed/formalized a bit since opening the new gym.  Are you no longer interested in open sharing this information with other community members now that its your professional livelihood?

Offline Chad Zwadlo (Zwadloc)

  • Hirundo Rustica
  • *****
  • Posts: 601
  • Karma: +41/-6
    • View Profile
    • Fight or Flight Academy
Re: Teaching Tips? (Expert help desired)
« Reply #25 on: October 01, 2011, 04:19:35 PM »
I'm still up for giving my packet of info to anyone who needs it.  As long as your not planning on opening a gym up next door to me  :P .  When I was getting my programs started there was hardly any info out there for helping with it.  I had to pretty much make everything up as I went.  I think having more programs and better programs available throughout the entire country will only help us all in the long run.  Just send me a private message with your e-mail and I'll send it your way.

Offline Patrick Witbrod

  • Administrator
  • Mangabey
  • *****
  • Posts: 424
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Teaching Tips? (Expert help desired)
« Reply #26 on: December 02, 2011, 01:22:51 PM »
Hey sorry for the necro thread but I have a question. Yesterday there was a jam with one new person. I don't really do much outside cause everyone does their own thing and I didn't take gymnastics and don't push myself to the the point if injury outside trying to flip so "I don't know anything." They went straight to teaching this kid wall climbs. I personally would have started with rolls but they only do that inside where they can't do other things.

Now my main statement is this. They kept having him try a wall climb the Kip muscle up way and he kept falling. (Small wall tall kid it was 4 in till he landed on his feet). I finnaly stepped in and said he can't do it that way yet he's not strong enough and doesn't have the body control and suggested he start practicing with some momentum by jumping into to muscle up or by doing negitives.They argued with me a little and said I was wrong and that this was easy he was just doing it wrong (he wasn't he just didn't have the strength or timing to do it he would grab the wall and fall off)  Was this the right thing to do or should I have let him keep failing at the same thing over and over again? What else could I have suggested to help him.O and the kid climbed the wall perfectly with some momentum.

Offline Jordan Strybos

  • Man of Skochy
  • Global Moderator
  • Hirundo Rustica
  • *****
  • Posts: 1337
  • Karma: +1337/-0
  • Lancaster, PA
    • View Profile
    • PKGA
Re: Teaching Tips? (Expert help desired)
« Reply #27 on: December 05, 2011, 11:18:55 AM »
They went straight to teaching this kid wall climbs. I personally would have started with rolls but they only do that inside where they can't do other things.

First off, if the kid wanted to jump straight to trying wall climbs, there's nothing wrong with letting him do so as long as the wall is safe and small. If someone's beginning and excited about doing fun things and you just bore them with nothing but rolls and basics, chances are they won't have all of the fun that they're expecting to have.

Now my main statement is this. They kept having him try a wall climb the Kip muscle up way and he kept falling. (Small wall tall kid it was 4 in till he landed on his feet). I finnaly stepped in and said he can't do it that way yet he's not strong enough and doesn't have the body control and suggested he start practicing with some momentum by jumping into to muscle up or by doing negitives.They argued with me a little and said I was wrong and that this was easy he was just doing it wrong (he wasn't he just didn't have the strength or timing to do it he would grab the wall and fall off)  Was this the right thing to do or should I have let him keep failing at the same thing over and over again? What else could I have suggested to help him.O and the kid climbed the wall perfectly with some momentum.

You're not wrong to suggest a different way of training/progressing up to the movement and I don't really think that your suggestion should have started an argument or anything, but I'm sure the situation panned out differently that how I'm picturing it. Depending on the kid, sometimes people need to just try and try and try until they master some things. Half of the time, we have the capability to do a movement perfectly the first time, but our minds prevent us from succeeding. Logically, if we can't do something the first time, the second time we should be more tired than before and thusly again incapable of executing the movement. So, in this case, this kid had the power to do a climb up the whole time, but he was holding himself back.

On one hand, they have no place to completely refuse your suggestion and argue with your ideas, but you also can't do the same to them. If they are trying to help this kid, you suggest something, and they reject your idea, just go do your own thing! As long as the person isn't trying anything dangerous (as you said he wasn't), I would probably just walk away and let the kid learn the way that he wants to.

Offline Patrick Witbrod

  • Administrator
  • Mangabey
  • *****
  • Posts: 424
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Teaching Tips? (Expert help desired)
« Reply #28 on: December 05, 2011, 02:17:08 PM »
Sorry I wasn't clear the kid wasn't asking for anything he was happy doing vaults and anything else. It two of the other veterans who are intent on starting with "climbing s#@$. " I wasn't trying to start an argument. I was just making a suggestion. They just didn't want to be questioned I guess.?

Thanks for reply

Offline Alec Furtado

  • kicks butt.
  • Moderator
  • Hirundo Rustica
  • *****
  • Posts: 1992
  • Karma: +27/-6
  • Balance.
    • View Profile
Re: Teaching Tips? (Expert help desired)
« Reply #29 on: December 05, 2011, 11:51:59 PM »
Some people can't take advice very well. For one thing, it sounds like there were already too many cooks in the kitchen. More than 1 person giving instruction is obnoxious, especially when it's only to a single new person. I just drop out of the situation if this happens, assuming they aren't saying things really bad. If I really have something to add, I've always asked if they mind if I jump in.

It's nothing specific to parkour, IMO. People can get really excited and protective over people they teach in just about anything.
Water conforms to the shape of it's surroundings. Do not be water. Shape your own life.

Offline Michael Bergeron

  • Oryctolagus Cuniculus
  • *
  • Posts: 36
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Teaching Tips? (Expert help desired)
« Reply #30 on: December 09, 2011, 07:59:53 PM »
I didn't see it mentioned but maybe lead a discussion for helping students develop an at-home workout or obstacles.

At-home workouts and obstacles are important if some of them can't make it to practice everyday, or if training sessions aren't held over the winter.
Not only do I not know what's going on, I wouldn't know what to do about it if I did.
~George Carlin