Author Topic: Alkaline Diet  (Read 9775 times)

Offline Nom

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Alkaline Diet
« on: November 09, 2005, 10:51:52 PM »
   I found this a while ago. Basically it is an alkaline diet with very low acid content. We eat lot's of sugar and animal proteins, who doesn't? That sort of stuff creates acid in your body, and "acidizes" your blood and tissues. Bodies oxidize food which gives you energy. Overly acidic bodies ferment sugars and proteins making you kind of sluggish and slows down the bodies cleansing processes. This deprives your insides of oxygens and your cells quite literally begin choking to death, setting into motion a destructive "Cycle of Imbalance, " which, with each revolution, leads to advanced stages of ill health.
The body was designed to operate on 80% alkaline foods and 20% acidic foods, today, our average is 10% alkaline, no wonder we're out of shape. Because of this imbalance our bodies oxidize less and starts fermenting pretty much everything we consume so instead of getting energy the food stays stagnant causing further acidification.

   Phytonutrients, or phytochemicals are very beneficial as nutrients, helping prevent cancer, lower cholesterol, relieve arthritis and osteoporosis, and stop hormones from being turned into acids, etc... Dark green and yellow vegetables are excellent choices for this: Asparagus, beets, broccoli, brussels sprouts, burdock, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, eggplant garlic, green and yellow squash, green beans, pretty much any green stuff is good (rabbits have all that energy to jump around right? smart rabbits), okra, onions parsley, parsnips, peas, radishes, red and yellow and green peppers, rutabagas, salsify, scallions, seag veggies, sprouted grains, turnips, water chestnuts, grasses,  you know the stuff you really never think, "Hey, sure could go for <insert any of that stuff above>!"
For those people hittin' the low carb diet thing, you might try this diet out, because it's fairly low carb as well. Complex carbohydrates make acid when they break down, so keep carbs about 20% of your diet. Try to stick with simple carbohydrates, because lots of low fat vegetarian diets prove a favorable environment for microform overgrowth even in healthy digestive tracts. Hi carb veggies even should be eaten in moderation. Red Potatoes are great.

   Buckwheat groats and millet are high in protein and digest slowly, keeping blood sugar balanced. Spelt contains more protein. Cooking messes a lot of these enzymes in these foods, so the more you eat raw the better, the goal, 40% raw veggies.
Organic foods avoid exposure to pesticides and other jumnk drumped on most produce. Ideally get the freshest produce you can and clean thoroughly.

   I can't emphasize enough, drink water water water water, h2o.

   You can get all sorts of proteins in plants, so don't worry about protein difficiencies.

   Soy is pretty good for this, all sorts of useful stuff in soy.

   Fish is great, full of omega-3 oils, protein, and several other healthy nutrients. Down side is, no fiber and forms acid. Pretty much one of the only real meats you can eat on this diet. Choose the freshest possible.
 
 I haven't personally applied this to my own diet, but I thought someone might find it useful. I know some people who have done this, they say it's great. I like steak.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2005, 11:38:56 PM by Nom »
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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2005, 07:13:02 AM »
Check out the book "The Paleo Diet for Athletes" for lots of information on Alkaline/Base balance and diet. Basically, fruits and vegetables are the only foods that cause a net alkaline balance. This doesn't mean you should only eat fruits and vegetables, but that your diet should be based mainly on fresh produce, lean meats, and nuts and seeds. Beyond that, all other food is nutritionally inferior, displacing vital nutrients for little return (dairy, grains and legumes fall into this category)

There's a lot of good resources online, check out: http://www.thepaleodiet.com/newsletter.htm for some more info.

Offline Nom

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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2005, 11:13:29 AM »
Hey thanks gear. I'll check it out post haste.
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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2005, 04:22:18 PM »
Also, John Berardi has an excellent article about acid/base balance, it's definitely worth checking out (along with all the other awesome nutrition articles on his sit)

http://www.johnberardi.com

Offline matt marshall

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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2005, 07:01:48 PM »
umm to an earlier post saying daairy is bad for athletes.  yeah dairy thats milk right? right.  milk has lotsa calcium right? right.  in chemistry class they said calcium is an alkali substance right? right.  and in nutrition class they said that calcium acts in our bodies to neutralize amino acids in our blood riiiiiight?  damn straight mofo. 

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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2005, 08:30:21 PM »
Hehe, sorry, but the chemistry of digestion isn't that simple. There are quite a few foods which act in opposition of basic chemistry principles until you know the process they undergo through digestion. Milk itself is relatively low on the acid/base scale, but cheese is very high. Milk itself has other problems, namely a disproportionate insulin response in comparison to its glycemic index. But I digress, check out the John Berardi article for all the info you'll need into this interesting nutrition topic. It's amazing what you can learn BEYOND high-school chemistry!  ::)

http://johnberardi.com/articles/nutrition/bases.htm

Offline matt marshall

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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2005, 11:21:41 PM »
ok enough playin, thats just how i like to jump into stuff i think it makes for an interesting read and amuses most people. 
on the flip side im actually supposedly intelligent.  majoring in adult fitness and exercise science with a minor in nutrition,  i rejustify my bias towards the usefullness of milk, a balanced diet, our friend red meat,  and last but not least i will do my best to help inform anyone as to whether a trend diet will do them any good.  ill do it with numbers, if need be ill even explain all the chemistry from the point at which it enters the mouth, ill even show my work like a good litttle boy. 


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Offline Quazar

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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2005, 06:22:06 PM »
Wow, Kannagisai, wish I'd-ave  know that.  Would have sought after allot more of your diet-exercise wisdom by know.

  I've got a few questions for whoever concerning this alkaline diet, number one, potatoes, very high in starch correct, and once starch is consumed isn't it then processed into sugar, making it..well, sugar!  Perhaps this has something to do with the specification you made towards red potatoes? I don't know, I'm just asking. and then;
  Oh and what you had said, gear about a disproportionate insulin response in comparison to its glycemic index... in milk.  Correct me if I'm wrong but in laymen's terms does that just mean that the amount of usefull sugar byproduct (insulin?) is inferior in proportion to the overall amount of raw sugar content including all the harmful elements in said sugar content (glycemic index?).
I'd really like to know more about this dairy stuff, including perhaps mental effects ie. concentration/dopamine response.  My body has always had a borderline unnatural craving for dairy. (Chugging a half a gallon of milk daily, for starters) and I'm very interested as too weather this is because my body truly wants it or if I'm actually doing myself harm by succumbing to superficial cravings.

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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2005, 09:11:24 PM »
Quote
I'm wrong but in laymen's terms does that just mean that the amount of usefull sugar byproduct (insulin?) is inferior in proportion to the overall amount of raw sugar content including all the harmful elements in said sugar content (glycemic index?).

Not really. Insulin is a hormone that is secreted by your pancreas as a result of increased blood glucose levels. The glycemic index (a scale that rates how much certain foods raise blood-glucose levels as compared to glucose, based on a 50g serving) used to be thought of as a directly correlative measurement of the insulin response (the amount of secreted insulin to a given food). One of the first modifications of this system was brought about by the introduction of the glycemic load measurement, which took the GI and multiplied it by the carbohydrate content of a typical serving. This helped to avoid a misunderstanding based on proportionate portion sizes, such as watermelon having a GI of 72, while milk chocolate has a GI of 43. The catch is a serving of watermelon that contains 50g of carbohydrates is HUGE, being that a good portion of its mass is water and plant fiber, thus a food can have a pretty high GI with a low GL, depending on the amount of fat, protein or fiber it might contain.

More recently, there has been a shift towards measuring the actual insulin response to foods that have previously been measured on the GI or GL scales. Generally, the GI of most foods parallels the insulin index, but with dairy this isn't the case. Regardless of the fat content of the dairy product, the II was much higher than the GI (milk's II=90 as compared to its GI of only 30...) Here is an interesting study on this subject:

http://thepaleodiet.com/articles/Milk%20Final.pdf

What they are currently hypothesizing is that the combination of lactose with the amino acid profile of milk may be at the root of the disproportionate insulin response. Whatever the root cause, over-consumption of milk may be a precursor to diseases related to hyperinsulemia and reduced insulin sensitivity. This flies in the face of other recent studies that show a decreased incidence of type II diabetes in those with increased dairy consumption, which just goes to show that nutritional science is fond of contradicting itself repeatedly.

In my opinion, it's an obvious fact that cow's milk is not made for human consumption, but rather for the infant stages of calves. This fact alone seems to suggest that there are plenty of alternative dietary sources of the nutrients that milk is consumed for. Coupling this with the newer research on acid/base balance in diet and its affects on calcium depletion of bones, and the above-cited study on the insulin response of dairy and its possible side effects, it seems safe to say that dairy products should be consumed in moderation in favor of more fresh fruits and vegetables, lean (preferably wild) protein, and nuts and seeds.

Offline matt marshall

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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2005, 11:32:26 AM »
i read the study.  they used sound science.  the conclusions they got to were actually pretty loose hypothesis that would only apply to very unhealthy people, people that are at risk allready for the diseases mentioned.  things that cause more insulin to go into the blood are good things in americans.  type two diabetes is one of the most prevalent causes of adult morbidity.(morbidity is when something almost kills you but instead it cripples you)  but yeah anywho they only studyied nine people, who werent athletes, athletes are a different brand altogether,  traceurs are a different brand even more so because of awkward demands on the body.  they might get a better study going and that would be cool.  they might have one now.  the schol that funded the research and the place im gonna to graduate school payed for the thing so i might as well stop in and see first hand what the hooplaa is all about anyway.  quazar the advice that is always given in the end is to try new things and to listen to your body.  somepeople are just different.  you maybe have some freakish need for milk for whatever reason.  i need insane levels of fat, no one knows why, i have been tested, i got low cholesterol and 7 percent body fat.  the levels i intake would kill most people in under a year guranteed.  so again just listen to what yer body tells you about what it takes in and youll usually be ok. 


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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2005, 12:49:58 PM »
Quote
quazar the advice that is always given in the end is to try new things and to listen to your body.  somepeople are just different.

That's exactly what it comes down to. I can read all the studies I want, but if I try the information on myself and it doesn't work, then it's not worth the paper it's written on. I say it's best to educate yourself, then just apply things that work, toss the things that don't. :D

Offline Ryan Ford

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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2005, 01:02:41 PM »
yeah fitness is a personalized thing. like they say, you can walk into a weight room full of bodybuilders and everyone there is an expert on their own body. but do they know what is best for you? nope.

Offline burn2k4

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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2005, 01:20:08 PM »
body builders are freakin weird anyways

Offline SovXietday

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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #13 on: November 16, 2005, 04:20:11 PM »
Gear, you're a freaking wealth of information... I really hope you jump into the proffessional field for dieting soon.

Interesting observations, I'm like kannagisal, I need more fat than most people just to survive. I have a somewhat low blood cholestorol level and about 7.3 BFP. Still can't break the damn 130lb barrier though... damn fast metabolism.

As said all throughout this post. Studies are studies, you have to do what's right for your body, whether a certain study says it's ok or not.
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Offline Quazar

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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2005, 04:40:52 PM »
Yeah, I feel ya, the pendulum on all these studies is always swinging from one extreme to the other, always contradicting, I'm startin to give up hope on all these trend nutritional discoveries.  Thats great advice though, thanks both of you guys for being so helpful.  Very cool.

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Re: Alkaline Diet
« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2005, 06:15:58 PM »
Hehe, thanks Sov, I'm working on it now.

The fat aspect is actually pretty cool. Through my association with crossfit.com I started looking into different dietary plans for optimum performance, and they recommend the Zone diet as the closest to a "standardized" dietary plan for optimum health. The interesting thing is, after following the ratios of carb/protein/fat for a few weeks, a person who is already lean and in good shape will start to hit a wall as far as performance. Instead of upping the ratio of carbohydrates, they recommend adding more healthy fats (monounsaturated fats, such as avacado and olive oil, and Polyunsaturated fats, especially Omega-3's, which are found in fish and fish oil). By the time you get the perfect balance, you are eating Xcarbs, Xproteins and 4 or 5X fats. I was really skeptical at first, especially because of all the low-carb hype that's been going around, but once I started studying a bit more about the optimum composition of the plan (lots of vegetables and lean meats, then fruits, then healthy fats, and very few refined carbohydrates) it began to make more sense. That doesn't mean jack until you try it, so I did, and have been following it pretty strictly for about a month now. So far so good, but I'll keep you updated. The one place that I've made concessions is during longer training sessions or all-day jams I still apply some of the recovery nutrition methods, such as replinishing glycogen stores with higher glycemic index carbs and protein. Also, now that I've gotten used to the ratios of macronutrients in many common foods, I am leaning more towards a cyclic pattern, which seems to mirror the way we would have eaten in nature when we were constrained by the seasonal changes.

Anyway..where was I going with all that. Oh, that contrary to popular belief, fat isn't bad for you at all, just the ratio of healthy fats to unhealthy fats. Active people need a good amount of fat for every bodily function, and if you already have a low body-fat % you can hardly get too much (needless to say, if you tried, I'm sure you could prove me wrong). This is really a topic all to itself, though, so perhaps I'll get together some of the intersting links that I've found on the subject and make a post and/or article about it :D
« Last Edit: November 16, 2005, 06:25:06 PM by gear »